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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sigv Austv 5I

R. D. Fulk (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Austrfararvísur 5’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 590.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonAustrfararvísur
456

ekkja ‘the woman’

1. ekkja (noun f.; °-u; -ur, gen. ekkna): widow, woman

[1] ekkja: ekkjan Holm4, 75c, 325VII, Flat, Tóm

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armi ‘wretched’

2. armr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): wretched

[2] armi: armr R686ˣ, 972ˣ, arm 68

notes

[2] armi drengr ‘wretched fellow’: The collocation is unusual, since drengr most often means ‘warrior, worthy man’ (see Jesch 1993a, Jesch 2001a, 216-32, and Goetting 2006 for discussions). The word is used, probably with mock-heroic tone, to refer to the skald and his companions in sts 11/7, 14/1, 14/2, 18/7, as is the derived adv. fulldrengila ‘most bravely’, st. 15/8.

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drengr ‘fellow’

drengr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ir, gen. -ja): man, warrior

[2] drengr en: so R686ˣ, 972ˣ, J2ˣ, 325VI, 75a, Kˣ, Bb, drengr in Holm2, drengrinn 73aˣ, 68, 61, Holm4, 75c, 325VII, Flat, Tóm

notes

[2] armi drengr ‘wretched fellow’: The collocation is unusual, since drengr most often means ‘warrior, worthy man’ (see Jesch 1993a, Jesch 2001a, 216-32, and Goetting 2006 for discussions). The word is used, probably with mock-heroic tone, to refer to the skald and his companions in sts 11/7, 14/1, 14/2, 18/7, as is the derived adv. fulldrengila ‘most bravely’, st. 15/8.

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en ‘any’

4. en (conj.): than

[2] drengr en: so R686ˣ, 972ˣ, J2ˣ, 325VI, 75a, Kˣ, Bb, drengr in Holm2, drengrinn 73aˣ, 68, 61, Holm4, 75c, 325VII, Flat, Tóm

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Óðins ‘of Óðinn’

Óðinn (noun m.): Óðinn

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erum ‘are’

2. vera (verb): be, is, was, were, are, am

[4] erum: corrected from ‘arrum’ 325VII

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heiðin ‘heathen’

heiðinn (adj.): heathen

[4] heiðin: so 73aˣ, 61, Holm4, Flat, Tóm, Bb, heiðnir Holm2, 972ˣ, J2ˣ, 68, 75c, Kˣ, heiðan R686ˣ, heiðinn 75a

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vér ‘we’

vér (pron.; °gen. vár, dat./acc. oss): we, us, our

[4] vér: vel J2ˣ, við 68, 61, om. Tóm

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Rýgr ‘female’

rýgr (noun f.): housewife

[5] Rýgr: hryggr Tóm

notes

[5] rýgr ‘female’: Rýgr (or Rýgi) appears among the giantess-heiti in Þul Trollkvenna 5/7III, and it is glossed mægtig kvinde ‘powerful woman’ in LP: rýgr; but the word may not always connote any particular power or trollishness (cf. Hallberg 1975, 166; Turville-Petre 1976, 82; Jón Skaptason 1983, 239), and it also appears among woman-heiti in Þul Kvenna I 1/5III .

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kvazk ‘said’

2. kveðja (verb): say, greet

[5] kvazk: kvezk R686ˣ, 325VI, 75a, 73aˣ, 61, Flat

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óþekk ‘The disagreeable’

óþekkr (adj.): [disagreeable]

[6] óþekk: áþekk 972ˣ, ‘oþegt’ Flat

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alfa ‘a sacrifice’

alfr (noun m.; °; -ar): elf < alfablót (noun n.): °sacrificial feast for or celebration of `alfar’; (Fr “Konr. (lege: Korm.) 218/1” => gera álfum veizlu af slátrinu Þorgeir Guðmundsson 1832 218/1 ≠ gera álfum veizlu af slátrinu Korm 288/9)

[7] alfa‑: ‘alba’ Holm4

notes

[7] alfablót ‘a sacrifice to the elves’: This is the only reference to this practice in Old Norse poetry, and its nature and that of the minor mythological beings called álfar is elusive (see Turville-Petre 1964, 230-2, Gunnell 2006 and Hall 2007 for elves in Old English and Old Norse tradition).

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blót ‘to the elves’

blót (noun n.; °-s; -): sacrifice < alfablót (noun n.): °sacrificial feast for or celebration of `alfar’; (Fr “Konr. (lege: Korm.) 218/1” => gera álfum veizlu af slátrinu Þorgeir Guðmundsson 1832 218/1 ≠ gera álfum veizlu af slátrinu Korm 288/9)

notes

[7] alfablót ‘a sacrifice to the elves’: This is the only reference to this practice in Old Norse poetry, and its nature and that of the minor mythological beings called álfar is elusive (see Turville-Petre 1964, 230-2, Gunnell 2006 and Hall 2007 for elves in Old English and Old Norse tradition).

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ulfi ‘a wolf’

1. ulfr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): wolf

[7] ulfi: ylfi R686ˣ, J2ˣ, ylfi corrected from ulfi 325VII

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ótvín ‘without hesitation’

ótvínn (adj.): unwavering

[8] ótvín: óttum R686ˣ, ótt vin 972ˣ, 325VII, ‘otuíns’ 73aˣ, ‘ót vín’ 68, ‘ot víns’ 61, eirlaust Holm4, ‘vt vín’ 75c, Flat, Tóm, Bb

notes

[8] ótvín ‘without hesitation’: (a) The present analysis (ó- + tví- as in tví-ræðr ‘ambiguous’) was implicit already in Hkr 1777-1826, VI, 85 and n., and it is advocated at length by Jón Þorkelsson (1884, 66-7); see also Note to Þjóð Magnfl 18/2II. Hallberg (1975, 167) would construe it not with mér hnekkði ‘drove me away’ in l. 6 but with kvazk ‘said’ in l. 5. (b) Ternström (1871, 45), following the analysis of the word given by Sveinbjörn Egilsson in LP (1860): óttvin, relating ót- to ætt ‘family’, reads ótvin and interprets this as a vocative, ‘friend of the people’, addressed to Óláfr.

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í ‘’

í (prep.): in, into

[8] í: á 325VI, 61, frá Holm4, ór Kˣ

notes

[8] í ‘inside’: Noreen (1923, 37) would adopt ór ‘from’, the reading of (cf. Holm4: frá ‘from’), and connect the prepositional phrase with hnekkði ‘drove away’ in l. 6. Certainly, ór would simplify the word order in regard to the final line, but it seems characteristic of Sigvatr’s style to end the main clause beginning in l. 5 in the final line, rather than to end it in l. 7. At all events, it is easier to explain why a copyist should have altered í to ór than the reverse.

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sínum ‘her’

3. sinn (pron.; °f. sín, n. sitt): (refl. poss. pron.)

[8] sínum: þeirra Holm4

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Sigvatr comes to another farm, where the woman of the house stands in the doorway and tells him he cannot enter, saying they are holding a sacrifice to the elves.

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