skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Sigv ErfÓl 17I

Judith Jesch (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Erfidrápa Óláfs helga 17’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 685.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonErfidrápa Óláfs helga
161718

Þollr ‘The fir-tree’

þollr (noun m.): fir-tree

kennings

Þollr seims,
‘The fir-tree of gold ’
   = MAN

The fir-tree of gold → MAN
Close

snilli ‘valour’

snilli (noun f.): eloquence

[1] snilli: so all others, ‘snylli’ Kˣ

Close

seims ‘of gold’

2. seimr (noun m.; °dat. -i): gold

kennings

Þollr seims,
‘The fir-tree of gold ’
   = MAN

The fir-tree of gold → MAN
Close

en ‘and’

2. en (conj.): but, and

[2] en: om. Holm4, er Tóm

Close

þat ‘that’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

[2] þat veitk (‘þat veit ec’): þat veit Holm2, ek þat veit J2ˣ, veit ek Holm4, ‘þ(ar v)eit ek’(?) 61, þat frá ek Flat, þar veit ek Tóm

notes

[2] veitk þat heiman ‘I know that from home’: It is not clear which statement this refers to. The precise antecedent of þat n. ‘that’ cannot be the f. snilli ‘valour’. It may be the fact of Þórir’s valour (so Hkr 1893-1901, IV) or the fact that some question it (so ÍF 27). ‘Home’ presumably means Norway, where Sigvatr lived for much of his life; see his Biography above, and Note to st. 15/7.

Close

veitk ‘I know’

1. vita (verb): know

[2] þat veitk (‘þat veit ec’): þat veit Holm2, ek þat veit J2ˣ, veit ek Holm4, ‘þ(ar v)eit ek’(?) 61, þat frá ek Flat, þar veit ek Tóm

notes

[2] veitk þat heiman ‘I know that from home’: It is not clear which statement this refers to. The precise antecedent of þat n. ‘that’ cannot be the f. snilli ‘valour’. It may be the fact of Þórir’s valour (so Hkr 1893-1901, IV) or the fact that some question it (so ÍF 27). ‘Home’ presumably means Norway, where Sigvatr lived for much of his life; see his Biography above, and Note to st. 15/7.

Close

heiman ‘from home’

heiman (adv.): from home

[2] heiman: heima Flat

notes

[2] veitk þat heiman ‘I know that from home’: It is not clear which statement this refers to. The precise antecedent of þat n. ‘that’ cannot be the f. snilli ‘valour’. It may be the fact of Þórir’s valour (so Hkr 1893-1901, IV) or the fact that some question it (so ÍF 27). ‘Home’ presumably means Norway, where Sigvatr lived for much of his life; see his Biography above, and Note to st. 15/7.

Close

hverr ‘who’

2. hverr (pron.): who, whom, each, every

[3] hverr: hver 73aˣ, 325V, hvers Tóm

notes

[3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

sæi ‘might have seen’

2. sjá (verb): see

[3] sæi: sé 73aˣ, 325V, Tóm, sér 61

notes

[3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

Hunds ‘Hundr (‘Dog’)’

hundr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): hound, dog

notes

[3] Hunds ‘Hundr (“Dog”)’: The word hundr ‘dog’ can be used as a term of abuse (Fritzner: hundr). Fidjestøl (1987) analyses the irony in the derogatory connotations of hundr, while the poet is simultaneously praising Þórir’s valour, and traces this continuing ambivalence towards him in later sources. — [3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

Hunds ‘Hundr (‘Dog’)’

hundr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): hound, dog

notes

[3] Hunds ‘Hundr (“Dog”)’: The word hundr ‘dog’ can be used as a term of abuse (Fritzner: hundr). Fidjestøl (1987) analyses the irony in the derogatory connotations of hundr, while the poet is simultaneously praising Þórir’s valour, and traces this continuing ambivalence towards him in later sources. — [3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

verk ‘deeds’

verk (noun n.; °-s; -): deed

notes

[3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

stœrri ‘greater’

stórr (adj.): large, great

[3] stœrri: stœrra 61

notes

[3] hverr sæi stœrri verk … Hunds ‘who might have seen greater deeds of … Hundr (“Dog”)’: (a) The comp. adj. stœrri ‘greater’ is taken here, as by most previous eds, as absolute, without an explicit specification of what the verk ‘deeds’ are greater than. (b) Jón Skaptason (1983, 172) would link it with the second helmingr, reading es in l. 5 as ‘<than> when’. (c) Kock (NN §664) prefers the reading hver séi Hunds verk stœrri ‘which deeds of the Dog might be greater?’, but this has less support in the mss.

Close

es ‘who’

2. er (conj.): who, which, when

[4] es (‘er’): enn 61, 325VII, Flat, Tóm

Close

frýr ‘reproaches’

2. frýja (verb): reproach, complain

[4] frýr: vann 61, Flat, Tóm, ‘fir’ with vann written above 325VII

Close

Þóri ‘Þórir’

Þórir (noun m.): Þórir

[4] Þóri: ‘[…]’ 61, ‘þore(s)’(?) 325VII, Þórir Flat, Tóm

Close

es ‘when’

2. er (conj.): who, which, when

[5] es (‘er’): enn Holm2, en Holm4, ‘[…]’ 61

Close

þver ‘of the cross’

þverr (adj.): across < þvergarðr (noun m.)

[5] þver‑: ‘[…]’ 61

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

þver ‘of the cross’

þverr (adj.): across < þvergarðr (noun m.)

[5] þver‑: ‘[…]’ 61

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

garða ‘fences’

garðr (noun m.): enclosure, yard < þvergarðr (noun m.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

garða ‘fences’

garðr (noun m.): enclosure, yard < þvergarðr (noun m.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

þorði ‘dared’

þora (verb): dare

Close

Þróttr ‘the Þróttr’

2. Þróttr (noun m.): Þróttr

[6] Þróttr: þrótt J2ˣ, þrjótr 61, Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

hinn ‘the one’

2. inn (art.): the

[6] hinn: om. Flat

Close

of ‘’

4. of (particle): (before verb)

[6] of: om. J2ˣ, 73aˣ, 61, 325V

Close

glyggs ‘of the storm’

glygg (noun n.; °-s; -): storm

[7] glyggs: ‘g[…]’ 61, gnýs Flat, Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

glyggs ‘of the storm’

glygg (noun n.; °-s; -): storm

[7] glyggs: ‘g[…]’ 61, gnýs Flat, Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

glyggs ‘of the storm’

glygg (noun n.; °-s; -): storm

[7] glyggs: ‘g[…]’ 61, gnýs Flat, Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

í ‘at’

í (prep.): in, into

[7] í gǫgn: ‘[…]gn’ 61

Close

gǫgn ‘’

2. gegn (prep.): against

[7] í gǫgn: ‘[…]gn’ 61

Close

gunn ‘of the battle’

gunnr (noun f.): battle < gunnrann (noun n.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

gunn ‘of the battle’

gunnr (noun f.): battle < gunnrann (noun n.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

gunn ‘of the battle’

gunnr (noun f.): battle < gunnrann (noun n.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

gunn ‘of the battle’

gunnr (noun f.): battle < gunnrann (noun n.)

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

ranns ‘hall’

rann (noun n.): house, hall < gunnrann (noun n.)

[8] ‑ranns: ‑ramms J2ˣ, ‑rakkr 61, Flat, ‑rammr Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

ranns ‘hall’

rann (noun n.): house, hall < gunnrann (noun n.)

[8] ‑ranns: ‑ramms J2ˣ, ‑rakkr 61, Flat, ‑rammr Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

ranns ‘hall’

rann (noun n.): house, hall < gunnrann (noun n.)

[8] ‑ranns: ‑ramms J2ˣ, ‑rakkr 61, Flat, ‑rammr Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

ranns ‘hall’

rann (noun n.): house, hall < gunnrann (noun n.)

[8] ‑ranns: ‑ramms J2ˣ, ‑rakkr 61, Flat, ‑rammr Tóm

kennings

Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns,
‘the Þróttr of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall, ’
   = WARRIOR

the battle -hall, → SHIELD
the storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
the cross-fences of the BATTLE → SHIELD
the Þróttr of the SHIELD → WARRIOR

notes

[5, 6, 7, 8] Þróttr þvergarða glyggs gunnranns ‘the Þróttr <= Óðinn> of the cross-fences of the storm of the battle-hall [SHIELD > BATTLE > SHIELD > WARRIOR]’: This kenning is unusual for its number of elements and conjures up an image of Þórir defensively barricading himself in at the very moment when he strikes out at Óláfr, one of the several ironies of this stanza. Jón Skaptason (1983, 306) thought the kenning was ‘much too complex to be characteristic of Sigvat’ and found the ‘double use of shield disquietingly redundant’ but was unable to construe the stanza any differently.

Close

konung ‘the royal’

konungr (noun m.; °dat. -i, -s; -ar): king < konungmaðr (noun m.): king

[8] konung‑: konungs 73aˣ, 61, Tóm

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

See Context to st. 16. Þórir strikes back at King Óláfr and they exchange blows. Óláfr’s sword continues to be useless where Þórir is protected by his reindeer skins, but he does manage to wound him on the arm.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.