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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Gísl Magnkv 16II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Gísl Illugason, Erfikvæði about Magnús berfœttr 16’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 427-8.

Gísl IllugasonErfikvæði about Magnús berfœttr
151617

Blár ‘The dark’

blár (adj.): black

notes

[1] blár ægir ‘the dark ocean’: See Notes to sts 1/8 and 15/8.

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ægir ‘ocean’

2. ægir (noun m.): ocean, sea

notes

[1] blár ægir ‘the dark ocean’: See Notes to sts 1/8 and 15/8.

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skaut ‘struck against’

skjóta (verb): shoot

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gollnu ‘of the golden’

gullinn (adj.): golden

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Skein ‘shone’

skína (verb): shine

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hausum ‘the skulls’

hauss (noun m.; °hauss, dat. hausi/haus; hausar): skull

[5] hausum: hǫfðum H

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himins ‘of heaven’

himinn (noun m.; °himins, dat. himni; himnar): heaven, sky

kennings

eisa himins
‘the cinder of heaven ’
   = SUN

the cinder of heaven → SUN
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eisa ‘the cinder’

1. eisa (noun f.; °; -ur): flame, ember

kennings

eisa himins
‘the cinder of heaven ’
   = SUN

the cinder of heaven → SUN
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dǫglings ‘of the ruler’s’

dǫglingr (noun m.; °; -ar): king, ruler

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dreka ‘dragon’

dreki (noun m.; °-a; -ar): dragon, dragon-ship

notes

[7] dreka ‘dragon’: See Note to st. 15/5.

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djúps ‘of the deep’

djúp (noun n.; °-s; dat. -um): depth, the deep

[8] djúps val‑: djúpr sal‑ F

kennings

Valfasti djúps
‘The corpse-flame of the deep ’
   = GOLD

The corpse-flame of the deep → GOLD
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val ‘The corpse-’

1. valr (noun m.; °dat. -i; -ir): corpse, the slain < valfasti (noun m.)

[8] djúps val‑: djúpr sal‑ F

kennings

Valfasti djúps
‘The corpse-flame of the deep ’
   = GOLD

The corpse-flame of the deep → GOLD

notes

[8] valfasti ‘the corpse-flame [SWORD (brandr ‘fire’)]’: A kenning for ‘sword’. It seems that we are dealing with an ofljóst (‘too transparent’) construction, i.e. a play on the word brandr, which can mean both ‘sword’ (valfasti) and ‘fire’. Another alternative would be to adopt the F variant salfasti ‘hall-fire’ and read salfasti djúps ‘the hall-fire of the deep’, i.e. ‘the hall-fire of the sea’. The god Ægir was the personification of the sea (see Note to st. 15/8), and, according to the prose introduction to Lok (see NK 96), his hall was lit by white gold (lýsigull) (see also NN §2534 and the detailed discussion in Clunies Ross 1987, 138-50). Kock (NN §2534) emends to djúps svalfasti ‘the cool fire of the deep’ i.e. ‘gold’ while Finnur Jónsson (LP: valfasti 2) merely notes that the cpd in this particular instance means ‘fire’.

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val ‘The corpse-’

1. valr (noun m.; °dat. -i; -ir): corpse, the slain < valfasti (noun m.)

[8] djúps val‑: djúpr sal‑ F

kennings

Valfasti djúps
‘The corpse-flame of the deep ’
   = GOLD

The corpse-flame of the deep → GOLD

notes

[8] valfasti ‘the corpse-flame [SWORD (brandr ‘fire’)]’: A kenning for ‘sword’. It seems that we are dealing with an ofljóst (‘too transparent’) construction, i.e. a play on the word brandr, which can mean both ‘sword’ (valfasti) and ‘fire’. Another alternative would be to adopt the F variant salfasti ‘hall-fire’ and read salfasti djúps ‘the hall-fire of the deep’, i.e. ‘the hall-fire of the sea’. The god Ægir was the personification of the sea (see Note to st. 15/8), and, according to the prose introduction to Lok (see NK 96), his hall was lit by white gold (lýsigull) (see also NN §2534 and the detailed discussion in Clunies Ross 1987, 138-50). Kock (NN §2534) emends to djúps svalfasti ‘the cool fire of the deep’ i.e. ‘gold’ while Finnur Jónsson (LP: valfasti 2) merely notes that the cpd in this particular instance means ‘fire’.

Close

fasti ‘flame’

fasti (noun m.; °; -ar): flame, fire < valfasti (noun m.)

kennings

Valfasti djúps
‘The corpse-flame of the deep ’
   = GOLD

The corpse-flame of the deep → GOLD

notes

[8] valfasti ‘the corpse-flame [SWORD (brandr ‘fire’)]’: A kenning for ‘sword’. It seems that we are dealing with an ofljóst (‘too transparent’) construction, i.e. a play on the word brandr, which can mean both ‘sword’ (valfasti) and ‘fire’. Another alternative would be to adopt the F variant salfasti ‘hall-fire’ and read salfasti djúps ‘the hall-fire of the deep’, i.e. ‘the hall-fire of the sea’. The god Ægir was the personification of the sea (see Note to st. 15/8), and, according to the prose introduction to Lok (see NK 96), his hall was lit by white gold (lýsigull) (see also NN §2534 and the detailed discussion in Clunies Ross 1987, 138-50). Kock (NN §2534) emends to djúps svalfasti ‘the cool fire of the deep’ i.e. ‘gold’ while Finnur Jónsson (LP: valfasti 2) merely notes that the cpd in this particular instance means ‘fire’.

Close

fasti ‘flame’

fasti (noun m.; °; -ar): flame, fire < valfasti (noun m.)

kennings

Valfasti djúps
‘The corpse-flame of the deep ’
   = GOLD

The corpse-flame of the deep → GOLD

notes

[8] valfasti ‘the corpse-flame [SWORD (brandr ‘fire’)]’: A kenning for ‘sword’. It seems that we are dealing with an ofljóst (‘too transparent’) construction, i.e. a play on the word brandr, which can mean both ‘sword’ (valfasti) and ‘fire’. Another alternative would be to adopt the F variant salfasti ‘hall-fire’ and read salfasti djúps ‘the hall-fire of the deep’, i.e. ‘the hall-fire of the sea’. The god Ægir was the personification of the sea (see Note to st. 15/8), and, according to the prose introduction to Lok (see NK 96), his hall was lit by white gold (lýsigull) (see also NN §2534 and the detailed discussion in Clunies Ross 1987, 138-50). Kock (NN §2534) emends to djúps svalfasti ‘the cool fire of the deep’ i.e. ‘gold’ while Finnur Jónsson (LP: valfasti 2) merely notes that the cpd in this particular instance means ‘fire’.

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As sts 14-15 above.

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