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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sturl Hryn 4II

Valgerður Erna Þorvaldsdóttir (ed.) 2009, ‘Sturla Þórðarson, Hrynhenda 4’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 680-1.

Sturla ÞórðarsonHrynhenda
345

Framla ‘boldly’

framla (adv.): excellently

notes

[1] framla ‘boldly’: Skj B takes this adv. with the second cl., which complicates the w. o. unnecessarily.

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hömlu ‘rowlock’

1. hamla (noun f.; °*-u; *-ur): rowing position

[1] hömlu: ‘homlu’ 81a

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ins ‘of the’

2. inn (art.): the

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mærðarfróða ‘renowned’

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helduð ‘you brought’

halda (verb): hold, keep

[3] helduð: heldu E, 81a, Flat

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með ‘along’

með (prep.): with

[3] með: unni E

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láði ‘the coast’

2. láð (noun n.): earth, land

[3] láði: landi 81a, 8

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seima ‘of gold’

2. seimr (noun m.; °dat. -i): gold

kennings

stiklir seima.
‘thrower of gold. ’
   = GENEROUS RULER

thrower of gold. → GENEROUS RULER
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stiklir ‘thrower’

stiklir (noun m.): thrower, dispenser

[4] stiklir: stillir E

kennings

stiklir seima.
‘thrower of gold. ’
   = GENEROUS RULER

thrower of gold. → GENEROUS RULER
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Hræddar ‘frightened’

1. hræddr (adj.): afraid

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Hallands ‘of Halland’

Halland (noun n.): Halland

notes

[5] ferðir Hallands ‘the people of Halland’: The reading of 8 is lyddur (f. nom. pl.) ‘cowards’, which gives the l. a new meaning, mocking the people of Halland and at the same time diminishing the heroic aspects of the king’s troops, since cowards will fear anything, whereas the more neutral word ferðir ‘people’ indicates that the inhabitants fear only when given good reason to. The word lyddur could be a scribal innovation of the scribe of 8 or it could have originated with his exemplar(s).

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ferðir ‘The people’

ferð (noun f.; °-ar; -ir/-arMork 196¹²)): host, journey

[5] ferðir: lyddur 8

notes

[5] ferðir Hallands ‘the people of Halland’: The reading of 8 is lyddur (f. nom. pl.) ‘cowards’, which gives the l. a new meaning, mocking the people of Halland and at the same time diminishing the heroic aspects of the king’s troops, since cowards will fear anything, whereas the more neutral word ferðir ‘people’ indicates that the inhabitants fear only when given good reason to. The word lyddur could be a scribal innovation of the scribe of 8 or it could have originated with his exemplar(s).

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hringa ‘of rings’

1. hringr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ar): ring; sword

kennings

Baldr hringa;
‘Baldr of rings; ’
   = MAN

Baldr of rings; → MAN
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Baldr ‘Baldr’

Baldr (noun m.): [Baldr, Baldur]

kennings

Baldr hringa;
‘Baldr of rings; ’
   = MAN

Baldr of rings; → MAN
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var ‘was’

2. vera (verb): be, is, was, were, are, am

[7] var: so E, 81a, 8, om. F, varð Flat

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Jóta ‘of the Jótar’

jóti (noun m.; °; -ar): one of the Jótar

kennings

þengils Jóta
‘of the ruler of the Jótar ’
   = DANISH KING = Kristófór

the ruler of the Jótar → DANISH KING = Kristófór
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þengils ‘of the ruler’

þengill (noun m.): prince, ruler

kennings

þengils Jóta
‘of the ruler of the Jótar ’
   = DANISH KING = Kristófór

the ruler of the Jótar → DANISH KING = Kristófór
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óttalauss ‘not without fear’

óttalauss (adj.): fearless

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Nóregs ‘of Norway’

Noregr (noun m.): Norway

kennings

dróttin Nóregs.
‘the lord of Norway.’
   = Hákon

the lord of Norway. → Hákon
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dróttin ‘the lord’

dróttinn (noun m.; °dróttins, dat. dróttni (drottini [$1049$]); dróttnar): lord, master

kennings

dróttin Nóregs.
‘the lord of Norway.’
   = Hákon

the lord of Norway. → Hákon
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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

This st. follows right after st. 3, describing the voyage to Halland and the reactions of the inhabitants.

The st. contains verbal echoes of Arn Hryn 9, which describes Magnús inn góði Óláfsson’s fleet setting out from Norway on his expedition to Denmark in 1042.

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