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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sturl Hryn 19II

Valgerður Erna Þorvaldsdóttir (ed.) 2009, ‘Sturla Þórðarson, Hrynhenda 19’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 696-7.

Sturla ÞórðarsonHrynhenda
181920

Ríða ‘rode’

1. ríða (verb): ride

[1] Ríða: Reiða E, G, 81a

notes

[1] ríða ‘rode’: Lit. ‘ride’ (inf.). Mss E, G and 81a have the reading reiða ‘carry’ which could be taken with varrar eld ‘fire of the oarstroke’: Ek frá fjölð bragna reiða eld varrar ór breiðum borgum í móti svarra ‘I heard that a multitude of men carried the fire of the oarstroke from broad cities towards the proud lady’. Earlier eds prefer the F, Flat variant.

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fjölð ‘a multitude’

fjǫlð (noun f.): multitude

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víða ‘far and wide’

1. víða (adv.): widely

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valskar ‘the southern’

valskr (adj.): foreign, French

[3] valskar: vaskar G

notes

[3] valskar ‘southern’: Valland designated France, Normandy and Italy (ÍO). It is used here in the general meaning ‘southerners, the people of France and Spain’. See also Note to Mark Eirdr 24/2. The reading in G, vaskar ‘bold’, makes sense also, but it is not supported by the other ms. witnesses.

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varrar ‘of the sea’

1. vǫrr (noun m.; °dat. verri; acc. vǫrru): oar-stroke

kennings

eld varrar
‘in the fire of the sea ’
   = GOLD

in the fire of the sea → GOLD
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eld ‘in the fire’

eldr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i/-(HómÍsl¹‰(1993) 24v²⁴); -ar): fire

[4] eld: elds Flat

kennings

eld varrar
‘in the fire of the sea ’
   = GOLD

in the fire of the sea → GOLD

notes

[4] eld (m. dat. sg.) ‘fire’: Earlier eds emend to eldi (m. dat. sg.), because gleðjask ‘rejoice’ takes the dat. (see NS §109). That emendation is unnecessary, however, if we assume a dat. form without the -i ending, i.e. declined as an i-stem rather than an a-stem (see ANG §358.3). The dat. eldi is used elsewhere in this poem, however (see st. 12/3), and it is possible that the -i ending has been lost in hiatus (elision). For the kenning eld varrar ‘fire of the sea’ (i.e. ‘gold’), see also st. 1/2 above.

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í ‘’

í (prep.): in, into

[4] í: á E

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móti ‘towards’

móti (prep.): against

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svarra ‘the proud lady’

svarri (noun m.; °-a): (proud) lady

[4] svarra: ‘svraia’ G

notes

[4] svarra ‘proud lady’: The scribe of G seems to have written ‘svraia’. There clearly is a -ra abbreviation sign, not -ar sign as Finnur Jónsson tentatively suggested (Skj A), possibly a failed attempt to correct a mistake.

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snildarbrúðr ‘the eloquent bride’

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þann ‘the one’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

notes

[6] þann er vildi ‘the one that (she) wanted to have’: The reading in 81a, þann eigi vildi ‘the one that (she) did not want’, does not fit with the prose narrative, nor does it make much sense from a logical point of view.

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er ‘that’

2. er (conj.): who, which, when

[6] er eiga: eigi 81a

notes

[6] þann er vildi ‘the one that (she) wanted to have’: The reading in 81a, þann eigi vildi ‘the one that (she) did not want’, does not fit with the prose narrative, nor does it make much sense from a logical point of view.

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vildi ‘wanted’

vilja (verb): want, intend

notes

[6] þann er vildi ‘the one that (she) wanted to have’: The reading in 81a, þann eigi vildi ‘the one that (she) did not want’, does not fit with the prose narrative, nor does it make much sense from a logical point of view.

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öðlings ‘of the ruler’

ǫðlingr (noun m.; °; -ar): prince, ruler

[7] öðlings: auðliga G

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af ‘according’

af (prep.): from

[7] af: á E

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æztra ‘of the foremost’

œðri (adj. comp.): nobler, higher

[8] æztra manna: æztan mann sjá Flat

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manna ‘of men’

maðr (noun m.): man, person

[8] æztra manna: æztan mann sjá Flat

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svanni ‘proud lady’

svanni (noun m.): lady, woman

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Sturla returns to the description of Princess Kristín’s journey to Spain in 1257. The princess enjoyed a royal reception in every city she came to and finally chose Prince Philip to be her husband.

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