skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Eyv Lv 1I

Russell Poole (ed.) 2012, ‘Eyvindr skáldaspillir Finnsson, Lausavísur 1’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 215.

Eyvindr skáldaspillir FinnssonLausavísur
12

Blóðøxar ‘[Eiríkr] Blóðøx (‘Blood-axe’)’

blóðøx (noun f.; °·øxar/exar/axar, acc. ·øxi/exi/ǫx): blood-axe

notes

[1, 3] ins hvassa Blóðøxar ‘of the keen [Eiríkr] Blóðøx (“Blood-axe”)’: King Eiríkr Haraldsson: see Introduction. The origin of Eiríkr’s nickname, first attested in this stanza, is unclear: it might refer affirmatively to his victories or hostilely to his alleged fratricidal tendencies (Andersen 1977, 92-3). A play upon the nickname evidently determines the choice of adj. hvassa ‘keen’, which however has natural (m.) gender, agreeing with implicit Eiríks, rather than grammatical (f.) gender, agreeing with -øxar ‘axe’ (Hkr 1893-1901, IV; ÍF 26). Kock argues for agreement with the sword-kenning fetilstinga (NN §2215), which would also be possible, as, grammatically, would agreement with -þings ‘assembly’.

Close

téa ‘are’

tjá (verb): to put in order, prepare

[1] téa: trú ek Flat, má FskBˣ

notes

[1] téa beiða ‘are asking’: The verb téa/tjá ‘show’ seems to have become conflated with another verb tœja/týja ‘help’ (cf. Fritzner: tjá, týja, tœja; LP: téa, tjá, týja, tœja) and in skaldic usage could function as a mere auxiliary. It was evidently unfamiliar enough to cause confusion in transmission.

Close

beiða ‘asking for’

beiða (verb; °-dd-): ask, request

notes

[1] téa beiða ‘are asking’: The verb téa/tjá ‘show’ seems to have become conflated with another verb tœja/týja ‘help’ (cf. Fritzner: tjá, týja, tœja; LP: téa, tjá, týja, tœja) and in skaldic usage could function as a mere auxiliary. It was evidently unfamiliar enough to cause confusion in transmission.

Close

bryn ‘a mail-shirt’

1. brynja (noun f.; °-u (dat. brynnoni Gibb 38⁹); -ur): mailcoat < brynþing (noun n.): byrnie-assembly

kennings

brynþings
‘a mail-shirt-assembly ’
   = BATTLE

a mail-shirt-assembly → BATTLE

notes

[2] brynþings fetilstinga ‘a mail-shirt-assembly [BATTLE] with the sword-belt-stabber [SWORD]’: The line as a whole was imitated in various ways by subsequent skalds (see, e.g., ÞjóðA Lv 3/2II and Note). The cpd fetilstinga is highly problematic in the context of the line. (a) In this edn, following Hkr 1991, fetilstinga is taken as dat. or instr. case, meaning ‘with the sword’. This solution involves positing a weak declension stingi ‘stabber, dagger’ alongside strong stingr, as also in Lv 14/1 (see Note). (b) The cpd fetilstinga had been attached to brynþings by previous eds, to form a single kenning for ‘battle’ (‘assembly of the mail-shirt of the sword-belt stabber(s)’), but to do so results in redundancy, since either ‘mail-shirt’ or ‘sword-belt stabber’ (= ‘sword’) on its own is a sufficient determinant (Eggert Ó. Brím 1895, 27, cf. ÍF 26; ÍF 29). (c) Konráð Gíslason (1892, xxvi), followed by Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), emended brynþings to brakþings ‘tumult-assembly [BATTLE]’. (d) Kock (NN §253) retained the ms. readings but interpreted bryn- as a deverbative from bruna ‘to rush ahead’. 

Close

þings ‘assembly’

þing (noun n.; °-s; -): meeting, assembly < brynþing (noun n.): byrnie-assembly

kennings

brynþings
‘a mail-shirt-assembly ’
   = BATTLE

a mail-shirt-assembly → BATTLE

notes

[2] brynþings fetilstinga ‘a mail-shirt-assembly [BATTLE] with the sword-belt-stabber [SWORD]’: The line as a whole was imitated in various ways by subsequent skalds (see, e.g., ÞjóðA Lv 3/2II and Note). The cpd fetilstinga is highly problematic in the context of the line. (a) In this edn, following Hkr 1991, fetilstinga is taken as dat. or instr. case, meaning ‘with the sword’. This solution involves positing a weak declension stingi ‘stabber, dagger’ alongside strong stingr, as also in Lv 14/1 (see Note). (b) The cpd fetilstinga had been attached to brynþings by previous eds, to form a single kenning for ‘battle’ (‘assembly of the mail-shirt of the sword-belt stabber(s)’), but to do so results in redundancy, since either ‘mail-shirt’ or ‘sword-belt stabber’ (= ‘sword’) on its own is a sufficient determinant (Eggert Ó. Brím 1895, 27, cf. ÍF 26; ÍF 29). (c) Konráð Gíslason (1892, xxvi), followed by Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), emended brynþings to brakþings ‘tumult-assembly [BATTLE]’. (d) Kock (NN §253) retained the ms. readings but interpreted bryn- as a deverbative from bruna ‘to rush ahead’. 

Close

fetil ‘with the sword-belt’

fetill (noun m.; °dat. fatli/fetli; fetlar): strap, sword-belt < fetilstingr (noun m.): sword-belt stabbers

[2] fetil‑: fetils Bb, Flat, FskBˣ

kennings

fetilstinga;
‘with the sword-belt-stabber; ’
   = SWORD

with the sword-belt-stabber; → SWORD

notes

[2] brynþings fetilstinga ‘a mail-shirt-assembly [BATTLE] with the sword-belt-stabber [SWORD]’: The line as a whole was imitated in various ways by subsequent skalds (see, e.g., ÞjóðA Lv 3/2II and Note). The cpd fetilstinga is highly problematic in the context of the line. (a) In this edn, following Hkr 1991, fetilstinga is taken as dat. or instr. case, meaning ‘with the sword’. This solution involves positing a weak declension stingi ‘stabber, dagger’ alongside strong stingr, as also in Lv 14/1 (see Note). (b) The cpd fetilstinga had been attached to brynþings by previous eds, to form a single kenning for ‘battle’ (‘assembly of the mail-shirt of the sword-belt stabber(s)’), but to do so results in redundancy, since either ‘mail-shirt’ or ‘sword-belt stabber’ (= ‘sword’) on its own is a sufficient determinant (Eggert Ó. Brím 1895, 27, cf. ÍF 26; ÍF 29). (c) Konráð Gíslason (1892, xxvi), followed by Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), emended brynþings to brakþings ‘tumult-assembly [BATTLE]’. (d) Kock (NN §253) retained the ms. readings but interpreted bryn- as a deverbative from bruna ‘to rush ahead’. 

Close

stinga ‘stabber’

stingr (noun m.; °; -ir): rod < fetilstingr (noun m.): sword-belt stabbersstingr (noun m.; °; -ir): rod < fetilsstingr (noun m.)

kennings

fetilstinga;
‘with the sword-belt-stabber; ’
   = SWORD

with the sword-belt-stabber; → SWORD

notes

[2] brynþings fetilstinga ‘a mail-shirt-assembly [BATTLE] with the sword-belt-stabber [SWORD]’: The line as a whole was imitated in various ways by subsequent skalds (see, e.g., ÞjóðA Lv 3/2II and Note). The cpd fetilstinga is highly problematic in the context of the line. (a) In this edn, following Hkr 1991, fetilstinga is taken as dat. or instr. case, meaning ‘with the sword’. This solution involves positing a weak declension stingi ‘stabber, dagger’ alongside strong stingr, as also in Lv 14/1 (see Note). (b) The cpd fetilstinga had been attached to brynþings by previous eds, to form a single kenning for ‘battle’ (‘assembly of the mail-shirt of the sword-belt stabber(s)’), but to do so results in redundancy, since either ‘mail-shirt’ or ‘sword-belt stabber’ (= ‘sword’) on its own is a sufficient determinant (Eggert Ó. Brím 1895, 27, cf. ÍF 26; ÍF 29). (c) Konráð Gíslason (1892, xxvi), followed by Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), emended brynþings to brakþings ‘tumult-assembly [BATTLE]’. (d) Kock (NN §253) retained the ms. readings but interpreted bryn- as a deverbative from bruna ‘to rush ahead’. 

Close

gerask ‘are becoming’

1. gera (verb): do, make

[3] gerask: gera Flat

Close

ins ‘of the’

2. inn (art.): the

[3] ins: hin Flat

notes

[1, 3] ins hvassa Blóðøxar ‘of the keen [Eiríkr] Blóðøx (“Blood-axe”)’: King Eiríkr Haraldsson: see Introduction. The origin of Eiríkr’s nickname, first attested in this stanza, is unclear: it might refer affirmatively to his victories or hostilely to his alleged fratricidal tendencies (Andersen 1977, 92-3). A play upon the nickname evidently determines the choice of adj. hvassa ‘keen’, which however has natural (m.) gender, agreeing with implicit Eiríks, rather than grammatical (f.) gender, agreeing with -øxar ‘axe’ (Hkr 1893-1901, IV; ÍF 26). Kock argues for agreement with the sword-kenning fetilstinga (NN §2215), which would also be possible, as, grammatically, would agreement with -þings ‘assembly’.

Close

hvassa ‘keen’

hvass (adj.; °-an; -ari, -astr): keen, sharp

[3] hvassa: hvǫssu Flat

notes

[1, 3] ins hvassa Blóðøxar ‘of the keen [Eiríkr] Blóðøx (“Blood-axe”)’: King Eiríkr Haraldsson: see Introduction. The origin of Eiríkr’s nickname, first attested in this stanza, is unclear: it might refer affirmatively to his victories or hostilely to his alleged fratricidal tendencies (Andersen 1977, 92-3). A play upon the nickname evidently determines the choice of adj. hvassa ‘keen’, which however has natural (m.) gender, agreeing with implicit Eiríks, rather than grammatical (f.) gender, agreeing with -øxar ‘axe’ (Hkr 1893-1901, IV; ÍF 26). Kock argues for agreement with the sword-kenning fetilstinga (NN §2215), which would also be possible, as, grammatically, would agreement with -þings ‘assembly’.

Close

se(tu) ‘’

Close

setu ‘of peace’

seta (noun f.; °-u; -ur): [peace]

[4] setu: ‘se(tu)‑’(?) 325IX 1 a

notes

[4] setuefni ‘the chances of peace’: The cpd is not included in LP, but occurs in prose with the sense ‘peace, stability, possibility of being in peace’, always, as here, in negative contexts (see Fritzner: setuefni). This ironically understated warning of imminent conflict is similar to the remark ascribed to Eyvindr in the preceding prose (see Note to [All]).

Close

efni ‘the chances’

efni (noun n.; °-s; -): material

notes

[4] setuefni ‘the chances of peace’: The cpd is not included in LP, but occurs in prose with the sense ‘peace, stability, possibility of being in peace’, always, as here, in negative contexts (see Fritzner: setuefni). This ironically understated warning of imminent conflict is similar to the remark ascribed to Eyvindr in the preceding prose (see Note to [All]).

Close

Heldr ‘rather’

heldr (adv.): rather

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

es ‘It is’

2. vera (verb): be, is, was, were, are, am

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

vant ‘difficult’

vandr (adj.): difficult

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

vilda ‘I’

vilja (verb): want, intend

[5] vildak: ek vissa 53, 325IX 1 a, Bb, vildum Flat

Close

k ‘wished for’

ek (pron.; °mín, dat. mér, acc. mik): I, me

[5] vildak: ek vissa 53, 325IX 1 a, Bb, vildum Flat

Close

segja ‘to tell’

segja (verb): say, tell

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

fôum ‘reach’

2. fá (verb; °fǽr; fekk, fengu; fenginn): get, receive

[7] fôum: fram 325IX 1 a, Bb, fara Flat

Close

fornra ‘our old’

forn (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): ancient, old

notes

[7] fornra ‘old’: The adj. presumably has the affirmative connotation ‘tried and true’, ‘battle-hardened’ (Hkr 1893-1901, IV; ÍF 26); cf. gamlir geirar ‘old spears’ (Sigv Víkv 14/3, 4).

Close

fljótt ‘quickly’

2. fljótr (adj.): quick

Close

her ‘of war’

herr (noun m.; °-s/-jar, dat. -; -jar, gen. -ja/herra): army, host < hersaga (noun f.): [war-stories]

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

sugu ‘’

Close

sǫgu ‘a tale’

1. saga (noun f.; °*-u; *-ur): story, saga < hersaga (noun f.): [war-stories]

[8] ‑sǫgu: ‘‑svgv’ J1ˣ

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

dróttni ‘lord’

dróttinn (noun m.; °dróttins, dat. dróttni (drottini [$1049$]); dróttnar): lord, master

notes

[5, 7, 8] es heldr vant segja dróttni hersǫgu ‘it is rather difficult to tell a lord a tale of war’: Hkr has earlier (ÍF 26, 176-7) mentioned Hákon’s stern reprimands to his coastguards for false alarms about the movements of the Gunnhildarsynir (Eiríkssynir).

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

The sons of Gunnhildr obtain intelligence that Hákon is attending a seasonal feast (veizla) at Fitjar on the island of Storð (Stord). They sail to intercept him, with a full complement of warriors, under the immediate command of Eyvindr skreyja ‘Wretch’ Ǫzurarson tóta (see Lv 3/4, 4/2 and Note to Lv 3/4). Hákon is caught unawares while at his day-time meal. Members of his entourage delegate the task of alerting the king to Eyvindr (so Fsk; the Hkr narration does not reveal the identity of the attackers at first).

For the battle of Fitjar (c. 961), see also Lv 2-5 below, Eyv Hák 2-9, ÞSjár Þórdr and Glúmr Lv. — Eyvindr is given the following aphoristic speech: ‘Litil er liðanda stund hærra en langt matmal’, ‘It’s a short time for somebody sailing, my lord, but a long time for a meal’ (Fsk 1902-3, 36; similarly Hkr, ÓT). It is possible that Eyvindr’s lausavísa was based on such dialogue. — [7]: The line lacks skothending as it stands and some eds have attempted to supply it. Jón Þorkelsson (1884, 44) tentatively replaces fôum and variants with fǫrum ‘we go / let us go’. Kock (NN §§2216, 2509, 2902F, I, 3048, 3396H) emends vápna to varna ‘defences, defensive weapons’. But such regularisations are scarcely warranted: hendingar were not mandatory in odd lines (cf. Notes to Lv 14/3, 4 and 14/5).

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.