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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Þloft Glækv 6I

Matthew Townend (ed.) 2012, ‘Þórarinn loftunga, Glælognskviða 6’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 871.

Þórarinn loftungaGlælognskviða
567

Þar ‘There’

þar (adv.): there

[1] Þar: þvíat 325V, ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n

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borð ‘in the wooden’

borð (noun n.; °-s; -): side, plank, board; table < borðveggr (noun m.)

[1] borð‑: boð 39, 325V

notes

[1] borðveggs ‘in the wooden structure’: Lit. ‘of the plank wall’. Here, as in previous eds, ‘-vegs’ is read as veggs. The gen. borðveggs could qualify either sæing ‘bed’ or bjǫllur ‘bells’. Kock (NN §1130), Magerøy (1948) and ÍF 27 prefer the latter, and this is followed here. Skj B prefers the former, suggesting the phrase refers to Óláfr’s wooden shrine. As to what may be referred to by borðveggr (a term also occurring in Vsp 24/5), Kock suggests the bell-tower, ÍF 27 the choir or chancel, and Magerøy (1948), by means of pars pro toto, the (stave) church building more generally.

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veggs ‘structure’

1. veggr (noun m.; °-jar/-s(Páll²A 257³³), dat. -/-i(kun defin.); -ir): wall < borðveggr (noun m.)

[1] ‑veggs: vegs Kˣ, 39, Holm2, 325VI, 321ˣ, 61, 325VII, 325XI 2 n, Bb, vex 325V, Tóm, ‘veg(g)s’(?) Flat

notes

[1] borðveggs ‘in the wooden structure’: Lit. ‘of the plank wall’. Here, as in previous eds, ‘-vegs’ is read as veggs. The gen. borðveggs could qualify either sæing ‘bed’ or bjǫllur ‘bells’. Kock (NN §1130), Magerøy (1948) and ÍF 27 prefer the latter, and this is followed here. Skj B prefers the former, suggesting the phrase refers to Óláfr’s wooden shrine. As to what may be referred to by borðveggr (a term also occurring in Vsp 24/5), Kock suggests the bell-tower, ÍF 27 the choir or chancel, and Magerøy (1948), by means of pars pro toto, the (stave) church building more generally.

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bjǫllur ‘bells’

bjalla (noun f.; °*-u; *-ur): bell

[2] bjǫllur: ‘biollr’ 321ˣ, 61

notes

[2] bjǫllur ‘bells’: Snorri Sturluson (ÍF 27, 409) interprets the miracle here as meaning that a sound could be heard above Óláfr’s resting-place, svá sem klukkur hringðisk ‘as if bells were ringing’, but it is more likely that Þórarinn is referring to literal bells, ringing by themselves within the church. ON bjalla f. is a loanword from OE (Fischer 1909, 24; AEW: bjalla).

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kneigu ‘’

knega (verb): to know, understand, be able to

[2] kneigu: kneiga 39, ‘kneðu’ 325VII, ‘kneg[…]’ 325XI 2 n, hanga Bb

notes

[2] kneigu: So Finnur Jónsson (1901, 111; also Skj B, followed in Skald), rather than knegu (Magerøy 1948; ÍF 27). The verb is an auxiliary to hringjask ‘ring’ (l. 4); see Note to st. 5/5, 8. 

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of ‘above’

3. of (prep.): around, from; too

[3] of sæing hans: ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n;    of (‘um’): ‘v[…]’ 39, yfir 61, ok um Bb

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sæing ‘bed’

sæng (noun f.; °-r/-(j)ar, dat. -/-u; -r/-ar/-jar): bed

[3] of sæing hans: ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n;    sæing hans: hans sæing Bb

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hans ‘his’

hann (pron.; °gen. hans, dat. honum; f. hon, gen. hennar, acc. hana): he, she, it, they, them...

[3] of sæing hans: ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n;    sæing hans: hans sæing Bb

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sjalfar ‘by themselves’

sjalfr (adj.): self

[4] sjalfar hringjask: ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n

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hringjask ‘ring’

4. hringja (verb): [ring, to ring]

[4] sjalfar hringjask: ‘[…]’ 325XI 2 n;    hringjask: ‘[…]ingia[…]’ 39

notes

[4] hringjask ‘ring’: A loan-word from OE (Fischer 1909, 24; AEW: hringja 3).

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ok ‘and’

3. ok (conj.): and, but; also

[5] ok: ‘[…]’ 39, 325XI 2 n

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klokkna ‘of bells’

klukka (noun f.): [bells]

[7] klokkna: ‘klvc[…]na’ 39, klokku Flat

notes

[7] klokkna ‘of bells’: Klokka (f., gen. pl. klokkna) is a loan-word, of disputed origin (Fischer 1909, 60; AEW: kløkkna; Kluge 2002: Glocke). Klokka is the older form, klukka (as printed in Magerøy 1948 and ÍF 27) the younger (CVC: klukka; Holtsmark 1955, 329 only records spellings in <o> in pre-1250 Norwegian mss). Flat’s reading specifies a single bell only (klokku gen. sg.). During his lifetime Óláfr had given a famous bell, Glǫð, to Clemenskirkja (Clemenskirken, S. Clement’s Church), whose sound (klukkuhljóð) Óláfr’s son Magnús was later to hear before the battle of Hlýrskógsheiðr (Lyrskovshede; see ÓH 1941, I, 629; ÍF 28, 43).

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hljóð ‘the sound’

hljóð (noun n.; °-s; -): sound, silence, a hearing

[7] hljóð: ‘[…]’ 39

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of ‘above’

3. of (prep.): around, from; too

[8] of (‘um’): ‘[…]’ 39, yfir 61, 325V, Flat, Tóm

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manni ‘’

maðr (noun m.): man, person < konungmaðr (noun m.): king

[8] ‑manni: ‘inan’ 321ˣ

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