Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Anon (Ragn) 9VIII (Ragn 39)

Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 39 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar 9)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 701.

Anonymous LausavísurLausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar
8910

Ok því settu mik         svarðmerðlingar
suðr hjá salti,         synir Loðbróku.
Þá var ek blótinn         til bana mönnum
í Sámseyju         sunnanverðri.

Ok því settu mik svarðmerðlingar, synir Loðbróku, suðr hjá salti. Þá var ek blótinn til bana mönnum í sunnanverðri Sámseyju.

And so head-dress wearers, sons of Loðbróka, set me up in the south by the sea. At that time I was worshipped to the death of men in the southern part of Samsø.

Mss: 1824b(76v) (Ragn)

Readings: [1] settu: ‘settv’ written in margin, corrected from ‘sęęttu’ deleted within the text 1824b;    mik: om. 1824b    [5] blótinn: blótin 1824b

Editions: Skj AII, 241, Skj BII, 261, Skald II, 136, NN §117; FSN 1, 299 (Ragn ch. 21), Ragn 1891, 223 (ch. 21), Ragn 1906-8, 174, 221 (ch. 20), Ragn 1944, 130, 132-3 (ch. 22), FSGJ 1, 285 (Ragn ch. 20), Ragn 1985, 153 (ch. 20), Ragn 2003, 68-9 (ch. 20), CPB II, 359; Edd. Min., lxxxii-iii, 94.

Context: The trémaðr continues his narrative with no intervening prose text.

Notes: [All]: Most commentators, e.g. Heusler and Ranisch (Edd. Min. lxxxii), Olsen (Ragn 1906-8, 222) and de Vries (1928a, 297) (cf. McTurk 1991a, 18), regard this stanza as combining with Ragn 40 to form a self-contained unit, cf. Ragn 38, second Note to [All]. Storm (1878, 83), Koht (1921b, 243), and de Vries (1928a, 297) moreover regard both stanzas as relatively old, hence dating from before the names Ragnarr and Loðbrók were applied in combination to the same person, as they were apparently for the first time in Ari Þorgilsson’s Íslb, written between 1120-33 (ÍF 1, xvi-xviii, 4). Whatever the original context of Ragn 38 may be, Ragn 39 and 40, with their references, respectively, to ‘setting up’ (settu, Ragn 39/1) and to ‘cloth, clothing’ (klæði, Ragn 40/8), may lend themselves more readily than Ragn 38 to discussion in terms of what is known from other Old Norse sources about trémenn ‘wooden men’. In Hávm 49 (NK 24; cf. Evans 1986, 49) the speaker says that he gave his clothes (váðir) in an open field (velli at) to two trémenn, who considered themselves reccar ‘warriors, champions’, once they had clothing (rift), since neiss er nøcqviðr halr ‘a naked man is despised’, i. e. (perhaps) ‘clothes make the man.’ Evans (1986, 93-4) notes that in other instances in Old Norse literature, including the present one, the trémaðr ‘always appears to have a cultic or magical connection’, and this is consistent with the trémaðr in the present instance being blótinn (l. 5), i.e. ‘worshipped (with sacrifice)’. See further North (1997b, 90-7). — [1] ok því ‘and so’: These words might suggest that this stanza and the next originally formed part (perhaps the end) of a longer sequence; Heusler and Ranisch (Edd. Min. lxxxii) suggested that they represented a somewhat awkward attempt to link Ragn 39 and 40 to Ragn 38, with which, in their view, they did not originally belong. — [1] settu … mik ‘set … me up’: Mik is not present in the ms. The 3rd pers. pl. settu ‘(they) set, placed’, naturally requires an object, and it seems clear from the second half-stanza that the trémaðr is referring to himself here (svarðmerðlingar in l. 2, which is in all probability a pl. form, is probably best taken as the subject of settu, and synir Loðbróku as an appositive parallel to the subject, cf. McTurk 1990, 323). Heusler and Ranisch (Edd. Min. lxxxii), whose emendation to settumk is followed (in adapted form) here, suggest Ár mik settu ‘Long ago they placed me’ as the original wording of l. 1, pointing out that ár ‘long ago’ would fit well with the þá ‘at that time’ of l. 5. They also refer to the suggestion of Edzardi (1855-80, III, 342) that mik ‘me’ may have stood in place of ok ‘and’ in l. 1 in its original form. — [2] svarðmerðlingar ‘head-dress wearers’:  Lit. ‘hair-trap wearers’. This cpd noun is a hap. leg. and a number of suggestions have been made about its meaning. (a) It is argued here that it is formed from svǫrðr m. ‘scalp (with the hair on)’, merð f. ‘trap (for catching fish in rivers or streams)’, and the suffix ‑lingr m. here meaning ‘bearing, wearing’. The noun svǫrðr occurs both in prose and in poetry in the meaning ‘skin’, especially of the head; it is listed in Skm along with other words, including hár ‘hair’, as the determinant in a kenning for ‘head’, with land ‘land’ as the base-word (SnE 1998, I, 108), and occurs in this combination in Ht (SnE 2007, 25; SnSt Ht 57/6III) as land svarðar ‘land of the scalp [HEAD]’. As for merð ‘fish-trap’, this word, listed as Fritzner: merð, mærð (both f.) and Fritzner IV: merð, merðr and mærðr (the last two m.), is explained by Þórhallur Vilmundarson (1998, 7-8) as referring to a ‘wickerwork fish-trap, usually with a funnel-shaped opening’ that was used in Norway and very possibly in Iceland too, to judge from p. n. evidence, for catching trout in particular. The word does not appear to have been used in poetry. Kock provides adequate support for the sense ‘wearing’ (or ‘bearing’) for the suffix ‑lingr with his reference (NN §117) to the analogous OHG sarling ‘bearer of saro (armour)’, i.e. ‘warrior’; cf. also Meissner 350. Since svarðmerðlingar lit. ‘hair-trap wearers’ seems to refer proleptically to the synir Loðbróku ‘sons of Loðbróka’ of l. 4 (see Note there), the term is probably to be explained by reference to the wearing of some kind of head-dress (McTurk 1991a, 26-7). There is evidence from Saami tradition for the ritual wearing of female costumes by male celebrants of pagan deities (Olrik 1905, 53-5), perhaps suggesting that svarðmerðlingar ‘hair-trap wearers’ here refers to wearers of female head-dresses in a context of pagan cult, see the Notes to l. 4 below. Possibly relevant here too are the brothers referred to as ‘the two Haddingjar’ in Hyndl 23 (NK 292), by Saxo (Saxo 2015, I, v. 13. 4, pp. 344-5), in Heiðr (Heiðr 1960, 3), and in Ǫrv 5/6 (cf. Ǫrv 1888, 97). Their name is apparently related to haddr m. ‘a woman’s (head of) hair’ (AEW: haddr), and because they appear consistently as a duo, they have been linked by modern scholars (Turville-Petre 1964, 213-20; Dumézil 1973, 106-25; Kroesen 1987) to the deities that Tacitus (Germania 1967, 473; cf. 479-82) equates with the Dioscuri twins Castor and Pollux, and says were ritually celebrated by a priest dressed or adorned like a woman. (b) An alternative explanation, proposed by Stefán Karlsson (though not published; see McTurk 1991b, 358-9) involves taking svǫrðr m. to mean ‘grass’ (cf. ModEngl. ‘sward’) (rather than ‘scalp (with hair)’), merðlingr m. as a diminutive of mǫrðr m. ‘(pine) marten’, and the word as a whole to mean ‘small animals of the grass’, i.e., ‘snakes’. Relevant here is the fact that two of Ragnarr’s sons, Ívarr and Sigurðr, have respectively the nicknames beinlauss ‘Boneless’ (or ‘Legless’) and ormr-í-auga ‘Snake-in-eye’, which both conjure up in different ways the idea of a snake (see McTurk 1991a, 41; and cf. the Notes to Ragn 6/7-8 and st. 8, above). Stefán’s view thus implies that svarðmerðlingar refers to two, at least, of Ragnarr’s sons. (c) Somewhat more far-fetched is the view of Olsen (1912, 29-30), that the first element in svarðmerðlingar derives from svǫrðr m. ‘skin with the hair on, (bacon)-rind’, and the second element from mǫrðr m. ‘marten’; and that the third, ‑lingr, is a diminutive suffix. The first two elements of the name, svarðmǫrðr ‘rind-marten’, would thus mean ‘boar’ and the svarðmerðlingar ‘piglets’ would be the boar’s sons, cf. Ragnarr’s reference to himself and his sons as a boar and porkers respectively in Ragn 27/1-5. (d) Other previous explanations of svarðmerðlingar all involve emendation: Finnur Jónsson in Skj B reads it as sverðmerðlingar ‘sword-trap bearers’, i.e. ‘shield-bearers, warriors’ (cf. also CPB; FSN I 299 n. 4; and Meissner 350); and Kock in Skald (cf. NN §117) gives the reading sverðmorðlingar ‘sword-murderers, warriors’; while Olsen (Ragn 1906-8, 221) attributes to Sophus Bugge the reading sverðmiðlungar m. pl., ‘sword-dealers’ by analogy with the vígmiðlungr ‘battle-dealer’ of Þjóð Yt 26/11I (cf. LP: vígmiðlungr); and Finnur Jónsson in LP: sverðmerðlingr tentatively relates the second and third elements in the word to the verb merla ‘illuminate’ (leaving ‑ingr rather than ‑lingr as the suffix), suggesting the sense ‘those who keep their swords shining’, i.e. ‘(active) warriors’. — [4] synir Loðbróku ‘sons of Loðbróka’: Or ‘sons of [Ragnarr] loðbrók’ (see below). According to this stanza, these men set up the trémaðr, perhaps as part of a religious ritual. If Loðbróka is a goddess-name (see the next Note), it may refer here to the goddess herself, in which case her sons are to be understood not as sons in a literal sense, but rather as devotees of her cult (Wickham 1993, 516). It is more likely, however, and is assumed here, that it refers to a female devotee and namesake of the goddess (cf. Turville-Petre 1964, 219), and that the sons in question are her physical sons, participating with her in the cult. They may be identifiable with those C9th vikings whom C11th sources consider to have been sons of one Loðbrók, a figure possibly referred to as female in one of the Maeshowe runic inscriptions of the mid-C12th (see McTurk 1991b, 343 and the contrary views of Lukman 1976, 13, and Rowe 2012, 155-7; for the inscription, see Barnes 1994, 185-6). Among them were Ívarr and Sigurðr, both remembered as sons of Ragnarr in Ragn. Contemporary annalistic evidence shows that these two were kings, in Ireland and Denmark respectively, in the second half of the C9th (McTurk 1991a, 39-49). The evidence for Ragnarr as their father’s name is less well established than the name Loðbrók(a), considered here as their mother’s, but it is possible that their father was Reginheri, a high-ranking member of the court of the Danish king Horicus I, and the leader of a viking attack on Paris in 845; see Introduction above. — [4] Loðbróku ‘of Loðbróka’: The identification and form of the pers. n. here depends on whether the final letter of the word is understood as an abbreviation for ‑ar in the form of a superscript <r> or as a superscript <v>. The present ed.’s reading (cf. McTurk 1991a, 22-5) differs from that of all previous eds, who without exception have understood the superscript symbol as an abbreviation for ‑ar, and expanded the ms. form to loðbrókar, taking it as the gen. sg. of the strong f. common noun loðbrók ‘hairy breeches’, and as referring to Ragnarr, to whom loðbrók is applied elsewhere as a nickname. (The earliest known reference to a person whose name can be equated with ON loðbrók occurs in the Gesta Normannorurn ducum (c. 1070) of William of Jumièges, where the name is plainly that of a king: Lotroci Regis ‘of King Lothrocus’, see st. 37, Note to [All], above and the Note to Krm 1/8. Cf. also McTurk 2011b, 8; 1991, 39-50; van Houts 1992-5, I, xxxvii.) According to McTurk’s reading, on the other hand, the superscript symbol in question represents <v>. The use of superscript <v> for <u> (in ‘nockvt’ = nokkut) elsewhere in 1824b (at 57v, l. 2, cf. Olsen, Ragn 1906-08, ci and 124, l. 28) supports the reading given here; see further McTurk (2007a, 57-9)). The word loðbróku may then be understood as the gen. sg. of a weak f. noun loðbróka, not otherwise attested in Old Norse. (Although the Maeshowe inscription mentioned in the previous Note uses the f. pron. hennar ‘her’ to refer, apparently, to the sons’ parent, the pers. n. to which it refers is loðbrók, not loðbróka). Bróka is listed in Þul Kvenna II 2/6III as a poetic term for ‘woman’, and this may support the notion that loðbróka may be the pers. n., Loðbróka. McTurk has argued further (1991a, 16-30; 1991b, 343-52, 356-9; 2007a, 57-9; 2011b, 9-14) that this may be a variant of the goddess-name *Loþkona (‘woman with luxuriant hair’?), which Sahlgren (1918, 28-40) showed to be deducible from the Swedish p. n. Locknevi (<Loðkonuvé) and to refer in all likelihood, with its implications of luxuriant growth (its first element means ‘hairy’, ‘woolly’, or ‘grassy’), to a fertility goddess. It is then proposed that it was as part of this goddess’s cult that the trémaðr is here claiming to have been set up. — [5-6] þá var ek blótinn til bana mönnum ‘at that time I was worshipped to the death of men’: The verb blóta often implies the process of worship involving sacrifice (cf. ONP: 1blóta and 2blóta). It is not clear whether the death or killing (bani) of men was part of the worshipping process or the result of it. Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) seems to assume the latter, translating da blev eg blotet for at slå folk ihjel ‘then I was worshipped for the purpose of killing people’; cf. Schlauch (1930, 256). — [5] blótinn ‘worshipped’: The f. form blótin has here been emended to blótinn m., since it is the trémaðr, presumably a male figure, who is speaking. — [7] í Sámseyju ‘in … Samsø’: This is the Danish island of Samsø, lying north of Fyn (Funen) and between Jylland (Jutland) and Sjælland (Zealand). The prose passage introducing these stanzas states that Ǫgmundr anchored in Munarvágr, lit. ‘Bay of Desire’ before his followers went ashore and found the trémaðr; this unidentified bay, again on Samsø, is also mentioned in Heiðr 18a/2, 27/8 and Ǫrv 7/2; see Notes there.

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Skj B = Finnur Jónsson, ed. 1912-15b. Den norsk-islandske skjaldedigtning. B: Rettet tekst. 2 vols. Copenhagen: Villadsen & Christensen. Rpt. 1973. Copenhagen: Rosenkilde & Bagger.
  3. FSN = Rafn, Carl Christian, ed. 1829-30. Fornaldar sögur nordrlanda. 3 vols. Copenhagen: Popp.
  4. Skald = Kock, Ernst Albin, ed. 1946-50. Den norsk-isländska skaldediktningen. 2 vols. Lund: Gleerup.
  5. NN = Kock, Ernst Albin. 1923-44. Notationes Norrœnæ: Anteckningar till Edda och skaldediktning. Lunds Universitets årsskrift new ser. 1. 28 vols. Lund: Gleerup.
  6. Meissner = Meissner, Rudolf. 1921. Die Kenningar der Skalden: Ein Beitrag zur skaldischen Poetik. Rheinische Beiträge und Hülfsbücher zur germanischen Philologie und Volkskunde 1. Bonn and Leipzig: Schroeder. Rpt. 1984. Hildesheim etc.: Olms.
  7. AEW = Vries, Jan de. 1962. Altnordisches etymologisches Wörterbuch. 2nd rev. edn. Rpt. 1977. Leiden: Brill.
  8. LP = Finnur Jónsson, ed. 1931. Lexicon poeticum antiquæ linguæ septentrionalis: Ordbog over det norsk-islandske skjaldesprog oprindelig forfattet af Sveinbjörn Egilsson. 2nd edn. Copenhagen: Møller.
  9. Barnes, Geraldine, Margaret Clunies Ross and Judy Quinn, eds. 1994. Old Norse Studies in the New World: A Collection of Essays to Celebrate the Jubilee of the Teaching of Old Norse at the University of Sydney 1943-93. Sydney: Department of English, University of Sydney.
  10. CPB = Gudbrand Vigfusson [Guðbrandur Vigfússon] and F. York Powell, eds. 1883. Corpus poeticum boreale: The Poetry of the Old Northern Tongue from the Earliest Times to the Thirteenth Century. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon. Rpt. 1965, New York: Russell & Russell.
  11. Evans, David A. H., ed. 1986. Hávamál. Viking Society Text Series 7. University College London: Viking Society for Northern Research.
  12. Turville-Petre, Gabriel. 1964. Myth and Religion of the North. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson.
  13. Fritzner = Fritzner, Johan. 1883-96. Ordbog over det gamle norske sprog. 3 vols. Kristiania (Oslo): Den norske forlagsforening. 4th edn. Rpt. 1973. Oslo etc.: Universitetsforlaget.
  14. NK = Neckel, Gustav and Hans Kuhn (1899), eds. 1983. Edda: Die Lieder des Codex Regius nebst verwandten Denkmälern. 2 vols. I: Text. 5th edn. Heidelberg: Winter.
  15. ONP = Degnbol, Helle et al., eds. 1989-. A Dictionary of Old Norse Prose / Ordbog over det norrøne prosasprog. 1-. Copenhagen: The Arnamagnæan Commission.
  16. ÍF 1 (parts 1 and 2) = Íslendingabók; Landnámabók. Ed. Jakob Benediktsson. 1968. Rpt. as one volume 1986.
  17. SnE 1998 = Snorri Sturluson. 1998. Edda: Skáldskaparmál. Ed. Anthony Faulkes. 2 vols. University College London: Viking Society for Northern Research.
  18. Fritzner IV = Hødnebø, Finn. 1972. Ordbog over det gamle norske sprog af Dr. Johan Fritzner: Rettelser og tillegg. Oslo, Bergen, Tromsø: Universitetsforlaget.
  19. FSGJ = Guðni Jónsson, ed. 1954. Fornaldar sögur norðurlanda. 4 vols. [Reykjavík]: Íslendingasagnaútgáfan.
  20. Edd. Min. = Heusler, Andreas and Wilhelm Ranisch, eds. 1903. Eddica Minora: Dichtungen eddischer Art aus den Fornaldarsögur und anderen Prosawerken. Dortmund: Ruhfus. Rpt. Darmstadt: Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft.
  21. Ǫrv 1888 = Boer, R. C., ed. 1888. Ǫrvar-Odds saga. Leiden: Brill.
  22. Houts, Elisabeth M. C. van, ed. and trans. 1992-5. The Gesta Normannorum Ducum of William of Jumièges, Orderic Vitalis, and Robert of Torigni. 2 vols. Oxford Medieval Texts. Oxford: Clarendon.
  23. SnE 2007 = Snorri Sturluson. 2007. Edda: Háttatal. Ed. Anthony Faulkes. 2nd edn. University College London: Viking Society for Northern Research.
  24. Dumézil, Georges. 1973. From Myth to Fiction: The Saga of Hadingus. Trans. Derek Coltman. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press.
  25. Germania 1967 = Much, Rudolf, ed. 1967. Die Germania des Tacitus. 3rd edn. Heidelberg: Winter.
  26. Heiðr 1960 = Tolkien, Christopher, ed. and trans. 1960. Saga Heiðreks konungs ins vitra / The Saga of King Heidrek the Wise. Nelson Icelandic Texts. London etc.: Nelson.
  27. Koht, Halvdan. 1921b. Innhogg og utsyn i norsk historie. Kristiania (Oslo): Aschehoug & Co (W. Nygaard).
  28. McTurk, Rory. 1991a. Studies in Ragnars saga loðbrókar and Its Major Scandinavian Analogues. Medium Ævum Monographs new ser. 15. Oxford: Society for the Study of Mediæval Languages and Literature.
  29. Vries, Jan de. 1928a. ‘Die westnordische Tradition der Sage von Ragnar Lodbrók’. ZDP 53, 257-302.
  30. North, Richard, ed. and trans. 1997a. The Haustlǫng of Þjóðólfr of Hvinir. Enfield Lock: Hisarlik Press.
  31. Olsen, Magnus. 1912. Stedsnavnestudier. Kristiania (Oslo): Aschehoug.
  32. Ragn 1906-8 = Olsen 1906-8, 111-222.
  33. Edzardi, Anton, ed. 1855-80. Altdeutsche und altnordische Helden-Sagen. Uebersetzt von Friedrich Heinrich von der Hagen. Stuttgart: Heitz.
  34. Ragn 1944 = Eskeland, Severin, ed. and trans. 1944. Soga om Ragnar Lodbrok med Kråka-kvædet. Norrøne bokverk 16. 2nd ed. Oslo: Det Norske Samlaget. [1st ed. 1914].
  35. Kroesen, Riti. 1987. ‘One Hadingus – Two Haddingjar’. SS 59, 404-35.
  36. McTurk, Rory. 1990. ‘The Poetic Edda and the Appositive Style’. In Pàroli 1990, 321-37.
  37. McTurk, Rory. 2007a. ‘Male or Female Initiation? The Strange Case of Ragnars saga’. In Hermann et al. 2007, 53-73.
  38. McTurk, Rory. 2011b. ‘The Household of “Ragnarr loðbrók”’. In Hudson 2011, 1-18.
  39. North, Richard. 1997b. Heathen Gods in Old English Literature. Cambridge Studies in Anglo-Saxon England 22. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
  40. Olrik, Axel. 1905. ‘Nordisk og lappisk gudsdyrkelse: Bermærkninger i andledning af solvognen fra Trundholm’. Danske studier 2, 39-57.
  41. Rowe, Elizabeth Ashman. 2012. Vikings in the West: The Legend of Ragnarr Loðbrók and his Sons. Studia Medievalia Septentrionalia 18. Vienna: Fassbaender.
  42. Sahlgren, Jöran. 1918. ‘Förbjuda namn’. NoB 6, 1-40.
  43. Schlauch, Margaret, trans. 1930. The Saga of the Volsungs; The Saga of Ragnar Lodbrok together with the Lay of Kraka. Scandinavian Classics 35. New York: The American-Scandinavian Foundation, Norton.
  44. Storm, Gustav. 1878. Kritiske Bidrag til Vikingetidens Historie (I. Ragnar Lodbrok og Gange-Rolf). Christiania (Oslo): Den Norske Forlagsforening.
  45. Þórhallur Vilmundarson. 1998. ‘Svikahrappar og lygamerðir’. Lesbók Morgunblaðsins 6 júní, 7-8, 17-18.
  46. Ragn 1985 = Örnólfur Thorsson 1985, 101-53.
  47. Wickham, Chris. 1993. Review of Rory McTurk. 1991a. Studies in Ragnars saga loðbrókar and its Major Scandinavian Analogues. Medium Ævum Monographs new ser. 15. Oxford: Society for the Study of Mediæval Literature and Culture. SBVS 23, 515-17.
  48. McTurk, Rory. 1991b. ‘Loðbróka og Gunnlöð: frá frjósemisdýrkun til víkingaveldis’. Skírnir 165, 343-59.
  49. Ragn 1891 = 2nd edn (pp. 175-224) of Ragn as ed. in Valdimar Ásmundarson 1885-9, I.
  50. Saxo 2015 = Friis-Jensen, Karsten, ed. 2015. Saxo Grammaticus: Gesta Danorum: The History of the Danes. Trans. Peter Fisher. Oxford Medieval Texts. 2 vols. Oxford: Clarendon.
  51. Lukman, Niels. 1976. ‘Ragnarr loðbrók, Sigifrid, and the Saints of Flanders’. MS 9, 7-50.
  52. Ragn 2003 = Ebel, Uwe, ed. 2003. Ragnars saga loðbrókar. Texte des skandinavischen Mittelalters 4. Vol. II of Ebel 1997-2003.
  53. Internal references
  54. 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 367.
  55. Not published: do not cite (ÍslbIV)
  56. 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Ragnars saga loðbrókar’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 616.
  57. Not published: do not cite (SkmIII)
  58. Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘Háttatal’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  59. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Anonymous Poems, Krákumál 1’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 717.
  60. Not published: do not cite ()
  61. Not published: do not cite ()
  62. Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2017, ‘Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal 57’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1166.
  63. Edith Marold (ed.) 2012, ‘Þjóðólfr ór Hvini, Ynglingatal 26’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 55.
  64. Hannah Burrows (ed.) 2017, ‘Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks 18 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Hervarar saga ok Heiðreks 1a)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 377.
  65. Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.) 2017, ‘Ǫrvar-Odds saga 5 (Hjálmarr inn hugumstóri, Lausavísur 1)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 816.
  66. Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.) 2017, ‘Ǫrvar-Odds saga 7 (Ǫrvar-Oddr, Lausavísur 1)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 819.
  67. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 19 (Sigurðr ormr í auga, Lausavísa 1)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 663.
  68. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 27 (Ragnarr loðbrók, Lausavísur 10)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 678.
  69. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 36 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar 6)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 695.
  70. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 38 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar 8)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 699.
  71. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 39 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar 9)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 701.
  72. Rory McTurk (ed.) 2017, ‘Ragnars saga loðbrókar 40 (Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Ragnars saga loðbrókar 10)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 705.
Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.