Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Anon Sól 6VII

Carolyne Larrington and Peter Robinson (eds) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Sólarljóð 6’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 299-300.

Anonymous PoemsSólarljóð
567

hjálpa ‘to help’

1. hjalpa (verb): help

Close

vaknaði ‘awoke’

vakna (verb): wake, awake

Close

en ‘and’

2. en (conj.): but, and

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

‘the one [the guest]’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

gat ‘’

2. geta (verb): to beget, give birth to, mention, speak of; to think well of, like, love

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

við ‘on’

2. við (prep.): with, against

[5] við: ‘[...] við’ 10575ˣ

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

syndum ‘his sins’

synð (noun f.; °-ar; -ir): sin

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

taka ‘took’

2. taka (verb): take

[5] taka: ‘taka[...]’ 167b 6ˣ

notes

[4-5] en sá gat við syndum taka ‘but the one took on his sins’: Falk (1914a, 3) draws the parallel between Christ and the good thief who was crucified with him in Luke XXIII.40-3. Njörður Njarðvík (1991, 197) compares the appearance of the thief in heaven in Niðrst2 (13-14). The idea that a malefactor takes on the sins of his victim is a theological oddity, which most commentators have ignored.

Close

hafði ‘had’

hafa (verb): have

[6] hafði: hefði 738ˣ

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.