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skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísur from Sturlaugs saga starfsama — Anon (StSt)VIII (StSt)

Anonymous Lausavísur

Lausavísur from Sturlaugs saga starfsama — Margaret Clunies Ross

Not published: do not cite (Anon (StSt)VIII (StSt))

 

Kominn er Sturlaugr         inn starfsami
horn at sækja         ok hringa fjölð.
Hér er í húsi         at höfuðblóti
gull ok gersímar;         grimt er oss í hug.
 
‘Sturlaugr inn starfsami (‘the Industrious’) has come to fetch the horn and a multitude of rings. Here in the building there is gold and treasures for a major sacrifice; our mood is ugly.
Skal hann í helju         hvíldar njóta
ok margskonar         meina kenna.
Þá mun Sturlaugr         inn starfsami
með góma kvern         grafinn í stykki.
 
‘He shall enjoy rest in Hel and experience many kinds of injuries. Then Sturlaugr inn starfsami (‘the Industrious’) will be torn to shreds with the hand-mill of the gums [TEETH].
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Information about a text: poem, sequence of stanzas, or prose work

This page is used for different resources. For groups of stanzas such as poems, you will see the verse text and, where published, the translation of each stanza. These are also links to information about the individual stanzas.

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