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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísur — Þstf LvII

Þórarinn stuttfeldr

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Þórarinn stuttfeldr, Lausavísur’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 479-81.

 

Hykk, at hér megi þekkja
heldr í stuttum feldi
oss, en ek læt þessa
óprýði mér hlýða.
Værir mildr, ef mæra
mik vildir þú skikkju,
— hvat hafim heldr an tǫtra —
hildingr, muni vildri.
 
‘I think that one may see us [me] here in quite a short cloak, but I say this lack of style suits me. You would be generous, if you would deck me out in a coat somewhat more desirable, ruler; I’d rather wear anything but rags.
Þú vændir mér, Þrœnda
þengill, ef stef fengak
frænda Serks at fundi,
folkrakkr, gefa nakkvat.
Lézt, at Hôkon héti,
hildingr inn fémildi,
(nú samir mér at minnask)
mǫrstrútr (á þat gǫrva).
 
‘Battle-brave lord of the Þrœndir [NORWEGIAN KING = Sigurðr], you promised to give me something if I could produce a stanza at the meeting with Serkr’s kinsman [= Hákon]. Generous monarch, you said that Hákon was called mǫrstrútr (‘Lump of Lard’); now it’s only fitting for me to recall that perfectly.
Fullvíða hefr frœðum
Fjǫruskeifr of her veifat
lystr ok leiri kastat
lastsamr ara ins gamla.
Ok vannt eina krôku
orðvandr á Serklandi
— Skeifr, bart Hǫgna húfu
hræddr! — varliga brædda.
 
‘Far and wide Fjǫruskeifr (‘Shore-skewed’) has dispersed his poetry, gleeful, among people, and, eager to blame, he distributed the dung of the ancient eagle [BAD POETRY]. And, word-wary, you barely managed to feed one crow in the land of the Saracens; Skeifr (‘Skewed’), you wore Hǫgni’s <legendary king’s> cap [HELMET] fearfully!
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