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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísur — Hár LvI

Hárekr í Þjóttu

Diana Whaley 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Hárekr í Þjóttu, Lausavísur’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 808.

 

Ráðit hefk at ríða
Rínleygs heðan mínum
láðs dynmari, leiðar,
lǫngum, heldr an ganga,
þótt leggfjǫturs liggi
lundr í Eyrarsundi
— kann þjóð kerski minni —
Knútr herskipum úti.
 
‘I have resolved to ride from here my long resounding steed of the land of Rhine-flame [GOLD > SEA > SHIP], rather than to walk on my way, though the grove of the limb-fetter [ARM-RING > MAN], Knútr, may lie with warships out in the Øresund; people know my spirit.
Lætka Lundar ekkjur
(læbaugs) at því hlæja
(skjótum eik fyr útan
ey) né danskar meyjar,
Jǫrð, at eigi þørðak,
ifla flausts, í hausti
á flatslóðir Fróða
fara aptr Vali krapta.
 
‘I will not let the widows of Lund nor Danish maidens laugh about this — we speed the oak of the deceit-ring [SEA > SHIP] beyond the island —, Jǫrð <goddess> of the ship of the hawk [ARM > WOMAN], that I did not dare in the autumn to travel in the Valr <horse> of the bollard [SHIP] back over the level tracks of Fróði <sea-king> [SEA].
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