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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Ingadrápa — ESk IngdrII

Einarr Skúlason

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Einarr Skúlason, Ingadrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 561-5.

 

Jón Sigurðsson (SnE 1848-87, III, 362-3) assigns four sts and one helmingr to a panegyric in praise of King Ingi Haraldsson, Drápa um Ínga konúng HaraldssonDrápa about King Ingi Haraldsson’ (ESk Ingdr), mistakenly including sts 4-5 of Kolli inn prúði’s Ingadrápa (Kolli Ingdr) and omitting the helmingr from SnE (Skm) below. Finnur Jónsson (LH 1894-1901, II, 70; Skj B, 476) corrects that error, but, as Fidjestøl (1982, 155) points out, the existence of such a poem by Einarr cannot be established with any certainty. The first st. is transmitted in mss R, , U, A, B, C of SnE. R is the main ms. and 744ˣ has been used selectively (see Introduction to Run above). Stanzas 2-4 are recorded in Mork and Fsk (FskAˣ only) at the end of the episode that describes the killing of Sigurðr munnr ‘Mouth’ Haraldsson. That event is also described in Hkr (ÍF 28, 338-41), but, although the prose follows Mork very closely, the sts have been omitted in the Hkr narrative. In Mork the sts are given as lvv. which Einarr composes as answers to questions from Eysteinn Haraldsson concerning Ingi’s involvement in the slaying of their half-brother, Sigurðr munnr. In Fsk the sts are also given as lvv., but here they are explicitly cited to absolve Ingi of any guilt in this incident (ÍF 29, 337-8): Þá var illa um þetta verk rœtt, ok kenndu menn ráðin Inga konungi, en þat hafa flestir menn fyrir satt, at þat hafi engi hans ráð verit, svá sem váttar Einarr Skúlasonr ‘Then this deed was spoken badly of, and people blamed these doings on King Ingi, but most people believe it to be the truth that this had not been his intention, as Einarr Skúlason testifies’. It is doubtful, however, whether the sts are lvv. that were recited on the spur of the moment, because the style and content are more compatible with an extended poem than with lvv., and the content runs on across the sts. The sts are interesting, because, if they belonged to a longer poem, they show how an extended poetic composition could be split up and rendered as a series of lvv. in the prose narrative (see Poole 1975).

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Skj B = Finnur Jónsson, ed. 1912-15b. Den norsk-islandske skjaldedigtning. B: Rettet tekst. 2 vols. Copenhagen: Villadsen & Christensen. Rpt. 1973. Copenhagen: Rosenkilde & Bagger.
  3. SnE 1848-87 = Snorri Sturluson. 1848-87. Edda Snorra Sturlusonar: Edda Snorronis Sturlaei. Ed. Jón Sigurðsson et al. 3 vols. Copenhagen: Legatum Arnamagnaeanum. Rpt. Osnabrück: Zeller, 1966.
  4. Fidjestøl, Bjarne. 1982. Det norrøne fyrstediktet. Universitet i Bergen Nordisk institutts skriftserie 11. Øvre Ervik: Alvheim & Eide.
  5. ÍF 26-8 = Heimskringla. Ed. Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson. 1941-51.
  6. ÍF 29 = Ágrip af Nóregskonunga sǫgum; Fagrskinna—Nóregs konungatal. Ed. Bjarni Einarsson. 1985.
  7. LH 1894-1901 = Finnur Jónsson. 1894-1901. Den oldnorske og oldislandske litteraturs historie. 2 vols. Copenhagen: Gad.
  8. Poole, Russell. 1975. ‘Skaldic Poetry in the Sagas: The Origins, Authorship, Genre, and Style of some Saga Lausavísur’. Ph.D. thesis. University of Toronto. DAI 38: 5489A-90A.
  9. Internal references
  10. Edith Marold 2017, ‘Snorra Edda (Prologue, Gylfaginning, Skáldskaparmál)’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  11. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Heimskringla (Hkr)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  12. Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘(Biography of) Einarr Skúlason’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 140.
  13. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘Fagrskinna (Fsk)’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. clix-clxi.
  14. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Morkinskinna (Mork)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  15. Not published: do not cite (SkmIII)
  16. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Biography of) Kolli inn prúði’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 528-32.
  17. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Kolli inn prúði, Ingadrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 528-32.
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Information about a text: poem, sequence of stanzas, or prose work

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