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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísur from Styrbjarnar þáttr Svíakappa — Anon (Styrb)I

Anonymous Lausavísur

Matthew Townend 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Lausavísur from Styrbjarnar þáttr Svíakappa’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1076.

 

Hildr stendr hverjan myrgin
hjaldrs und rauðum skildi;
nú hafa sigrmeyjar settan
sverðleik Dǫnum harðan.
Eiguð víga vægi
(vill Baldrs faðir illan
Óðinn harðr) sem allir
(óljósan val kjósa).
 
‘The Hildr of battle [VALKYRIE] stands every morning under a red shield; now the victory-maidens [VALKYRIES] have established hard sword-play [BATTLE] for the Danes. You have to fight with a sword, like everyone; Óðinn, the hard father of Baldr, wishes to choose the wretched, dark slain.
Eigi vildu Jótar
reiða gjald til skeiða,
áðr Styrbjarnar stœði
Strandar dýr á landi.
Nús Danmarkar dróttinn
í drengja lið genginn;
landa vanr ok lýða
lifir ánauðigr auðar.
 
‘The Jótar were not willing to pay tribute for ships before the beasts of Strǫnd <river> [SHIPS] of Styrbjǫrn stood by the coast. Now the lord of Denmark [DANISH KING = Haraldr] has joined the troop of warriors; he lives oppressed by fate, deprived of lands and people.
Lætr eigi mik lýtir
liðbands, sás frið grandar,
— reiðr emk stála stýri —
Styrbjǫrn vesa kyrran.
Þat mun sáð of síðir
sigrnennum her kenna
— roðin eru leyfðra lofða
lindi* — sôr at binda.
 
‘Styrbjǫrn, the harmer of the limb-band [RING > GENEROUS MAN], who damages peace, will not let me remain quiet; I am angry with the wielder of steel weapons [WARRIOR]. That seed will after a time teach the victory-minded army to bind [their] wounds; the spears of the praised men are reddened.
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