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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Poem about Haraldr harðráði — Grani HarII

Grani skáld

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Grani skáld, Poem about Haraldr harðráði’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 296-9.

 

Lét aldrigi úti
ósvífr Kraka drífu
Hlǫkk í harða þjokkum
Hornskógi brô þorna.
Fila dróttinn rak flótta
fjanda grams til strandar;
auð varð út at reiða
allskjótt faðir Dóttu.
 
‘The reckless one never let the eyelashes of the Hlǫkk <valkyrie> of Kraki’s <legendary king’s> snow-drift [GOLD > WOMAN] get dry out in the very dense forest at Hornslet. The lord of the Filir [NORWEGIAN KING = Haraldr] chased the fleeing troop of the enemies’ chieftain down to the shore; Dótta’s father [= Þorkell geysa] had to pay out riches very quickly.
Dǫglingr fekk at drekka
danskt blóð ara jóði;
hirð hykk hilmi gerðu
Hugins jól við nes Þjólar.
Ætt spornaði arnar
allvítt við valfalli;
hold át vargr, sem vildi,
— vel njóti þess — Jóta.
 
‘The lord gave the brood of eagles Danish blood to drink; I believe the ruler prepared a yule-feast for the retinue of Huginn <raven> [RAVENS] by Þjólarnes. Far and wide the kin of the eagle trod on the fallen carrion; the wolf ate the flesh of the Jótar as it pleased; may it truly enjoy that.
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