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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Mey 22VII

Kirsten Wolf (ed.) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Heilagra meyja drápa 22’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 905-6.

Anonymous PoemsHeilagra meyja drápa
212223

á ‘to’

3. á (prep.): on, at

[1] á: so 713, om. 721

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Maxencíus ‘Maxentius’

Maxencíus (noun m.): [Maxentius]

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óteljandi ‘with innumerable’

óteljandi (adj.): [with innumerable]

[4] óteljandi: óteljanda 713

notes

[4] óteljandi meinum ‘with innumerable torments’: On the inflexion -i for dat. pl. of pres. part. in later Icel., see ANG §435 Anm. 1.

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meinum ‘torments’

mein (noun n.; °-s; -): harm, injury

[4] meinum: píslum 713

notes

[4] óteljandi meinum ‘with innumerable torments’: On the inflexion -i for dat. pl. of pres. part. in later Icel., see ANG §435 Anm. 1.

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Kátrína ‘Catherine’

Kátrína (noun f.): [Catherine]

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sæta ‘sweet’

sœtr (adj.): sweet

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sæt ‘sweet’

sœtr (adj.): sweet

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brúður ‘the wife’

brúðr (noun f.; °brúðar, dat. & acc. brúði; brúðir): woman, bride

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

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kóngs ‘of the king’

kóngr (noun m.): king

[8] kóngs: guðs 713

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

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á ‘in’

3. á (prep.): on, at

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

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guðs ‘of God’

1. guð (noun m.; °***guðrs, guðis, gus): (Christian) God

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

Close

son ‘the son’

sonr (noun m.; °-ar, dat. syni; synir, acc. sonu, syni): son

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

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trúði ‘believed’

2. trúa (verb): to believe (in)

notes

[8] brúður kóngs trúði á guðs son ‘the wife of the king believed in the son of God’: According to her vita, Maxentius’s wife and the leader of his troops, Porphyry, visited Catherine in prison, and were persuaded by her to become Christians, whereupon they were themselves martyred.

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Stanzas 22-4 praise the virgin martyr S. Catherine of Alexandria, also the subject of Kálf Kátr (q.v.) and a C14th saga (Unger 1877, I, 400-21; Widding, Bekker-Nielsen and Shook 1963, 304-5; Wolf 2003, 123-41, 174-6). Her cult in Iceland, though popular, appears not to have taken hold until C13th (Cormack 1994, 86-8). According to legend, Catherine of Alexandria was a high-born, learned and beautiful virgin who denounced the worship of pagan idols to the emperor Maxentius and successfully debated this issue with fifty philosophers, who then converted to Christianity. She refused to deny her Christian faith and marry the emperor, for which she was beaten and then imprisoned. Later she was tortured on a spiked wheel, but it fell to pieces, leaving her unhurt. Finally, Catherine was beheaded, and milk, not blood, flowed from her severed veins. Angels carried her body to Mount Sinai.

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