skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Vitg Lv 1I

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2012, ‘Vitgeirr seiðmaðr, Lausavísa 1’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 141.

Vitgeirr seiðmaðrLausavísa1

text and translation

Þats vô lítil,         at vér síðim
karla bǫrn         ok kerlinga,
es Rǫgnvaldr síðr         réttilbeini
hróðmǫgr Haralds         á Haðalandi.

Þats lítil vô, at vér síðim, bǫrn karla ok kerlinga, es Rǫgnvaldr réttilbeini, hróðmǫgr Haralds, síðr á Haðalandi.
 
‘It is [does] little harm that we perform sorcery, children of lowly men and women, when Rǫgnvaldr réttilbeini, Haraldr’s glorious son, performs sorcery in Hadeland.

notes and context

King Haraldr hárfagri ‘Fair-hair’ Hálfdanarson, who has taken a strong dislike to sorcery, sends a message to Vitgeirr in Hǫrðaland (Hordaland) commanding him to cease that practice. The stanza is Vitgeirr’s response to Haraldr’s request.

On the practice of seiðr ‘sorcery’, see Strömbäck (1935) and Buchholz (1968). — In ÓH in Bb(120ra) the stanza is paraphrased as prose: ok quad þat vera litil mvni þott ver seidím born ok kerlíngar. En raugnvalldr seidir rettilbeiní þiodmagr konungs ahadalandi ‘and said it to be of little interest if we perform sorcery, children and lowly women, when Rǫgnvaldr réttilbeini, the king’s mighty son, performs sorcery in Hadeland’.

readings

sources

Text is based on reconstruction from the base text and variant apparatus and may contain alternative spellings and other normalisations not visible in the manuscript text. Transcriptions may not have been checked and should not be cited.

editions and texts

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.