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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Þstf Lv 3II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Þórarinn stuttfeldr, Lausavísur 3’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 481.

Þórarinn stuttfeldrLausavísur
23

Fullvíða ‘Far and wide’

fullvíða (adv.): [Far and wide]

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frœðum ‘his poetry’

2. frœði (noun n.): knowledge

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Fjǫruskeifr ‘Fjǫruskeifr (‘Shore-skewed’)’

fjǫruskeifr (noun m.): Shore-skewed

notes

[2] Fjǫruskeifr ‘(“Shore-skewed”)’: For Árni fjǫruskeifr, see SnE 1848-87, III, 633. The meaning of this nickname cannot be established with certainty (see Finnur Jónsson 1907, 323). Fjara (gen. fjǫru) is the part of the beach left dry at ebb tide, and skeifr means ‘skewed, crooked, lopsided, slanting’. Lind (1920-1, 82) suggests that skeifr could be used in the sense ‘clumsy person’ (cf. New Norw. skeiv), and that fjǫru could refer to Árni’s birth-place or dwelling.

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of ‘among’

3. of (prep.): around, from; too

[2] of: om. Hr, á F

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veifat ‘dispersed’

2. veifa (verb): [dispersed]

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lystr ‘gleeful’

lystr (adj.): eager

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leiri ‘the dung’

leiri (noun m.): [dung]

[3] leiri: ‘læri’ E

kennings

leiri ara ins gamla.
‘the dung of the ancient eagle. ’
   = BAD POETRY

the dung of the ancient eagle. → BAD POETRY

notes

[3, 4] leiri ara ins gamla ‘the dung of the ancient eagle [BAD POETRY]’: This refers to the amusing myth about Óðinn who, in the shape of an eagle, brought the mead of poetry from the giants back to the gods in Ásgarðr. When he came over that stronghold and was spitting the mead into containers, Suttungr, the giant who pursued him (also in the shape of an eagle), was so close that Óðinn inadvertedly excreted some of the mead from his rear end, and that became the bad poets’ share of the mead (see SnE 1998, I, 3-5). According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 254, 263, 276, 633), Árni composed a praise poem about Sigurðr jórsalafari, and Þórarinn is thus delivering a scathing insult to Árni’s poetic prowess.

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kastat ‘he distributed’

1. kasta (verb): throw

[3] kastat: ‘keistr’ 42ˣ

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lastsamr ‘eager to blame’

lastsamr (adj.): [eager to blame]

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ara ‘eagle’

1. ari (noun m.; °-a; -ar): eagle

kennings

leiri ara ins gamla.
‘the dung of the ancient eagle. ’
   = BAD POETRY

the dung of the ancient eagle. → BAD POETRY

notes

[3, 4] leiri ara ins gamla ‘the dung of the ancient eagle [BAD POETRY]’: This refers to the amusing myth about Óðinn who, in the shape of an eagle, brought the mead of poetry from the giants back to the gods in Ásgarðr. When he came over that stronghold and was spitting the mead into containers, Suttungr, the giant who pursued him (also in the shape of an eagle), was so close that Óðinn inadvertedly excreted some of the mead from his rear end, and that became the bad poets’ share of the mead (see SnE 1998, I, 3-5). According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 254, 263, 276, 633), Árni composed a praise poem about Sigurðr jórsalafari, and Þórarinn is thus delivering a scathing insult to Árni’s poetic prowess.

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ins ‘of the’

2. inn (art.): the

kennings

leiri ara ins gamla.
‘the dung of the ancient eagle. ’
   = BAD POETRY

the dung of the ancient eagle. → BAD POETRY

notes

[3, 4] leiri ara ins gamla ‘the dung of the ancient eagle [BAD POETRY]’: This refers to the amusing myth about Óðinn who, in the shape of an eagle, brought the mead of poetry from the giants back to the gods in Ásgarðr. When he came over that stronghold and was spitting the mead into containers, Suttungr, the giant who pursued him (also in the shape of an eagle), was so close that Óðinn inadvertedly excreted some of the mead from his rear end, and that became the bad poets’ share of the mead (see SnE 1998, I, 3-5). According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 254, 263, 276, 633), Árni composed a praise poem about Sigurðr jórsalafari, and Þórarinn is thus delivering a scathing insult to Árni’s poetic prowess.

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gamla ‘ancient’

gamall (adj.; °gamlan; compar. & superl. „ ellri adj.): old

kennings

leiri ara ins gamla.
‘the dung of the ancient eagle. ’
   = BAD POETRY

the dung of the ancient eagle. → BAD POETRY

notes

[3, 4] leiri ara ins gamla ‘the dung of the ancient eagle [BAD POETRY]’: This refers to the amusing myth about Óðinn who, in the shape of an eagle, brought the mead of poetry from the giants back to the gods in Ásgarðr. When he came over that stronghold and was spitting the mead into containers, Suttungr, the giant who pursued him (also in the shape of an eagle), was so close that Óðinn inadvertedly excreted some of the mead from his rear end, and that became the bad poets’ share of the mead (see SnE 1998, I, 3-5). According to Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 254, 263, 276, 633), Árni composed a praise poem about Sigurðr jórsalafari, and Þórarinn is thus delivering a scathing insult to Árni’s poetic prowess.

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Ok ‘And’

3. ok (conj.): and, but; also

[5] Ok vannt eina krôku: ‘[...]co’ Mork

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vannt ‘managed’

2. vinna (verb): perform, work

[5] Ok vannt eina krôku: ‘[...]co’ Mork

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eina ‘one’

2. einn (pron.; °decl. cf. einn num.): one, alone

[5] Ok vannt eina krôku: ‘[...]co’ Mork

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krôku ‘crow’

krákr (noun m.; °-s): [crow, Krák(?)]

[5] Ok vannt eina krôku: ‘[...]co’ Mork

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orð ‘word-’

orð (noun n.; °-s; -): word < orðvandr (adj.)

notes

[6] orðvandr ‘word-wary’: For the meaning of this word, see Fritzner: orðvandr and NN §967. See also Note to Rv Lv 14/8.

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vandr ‘wary’

vandr (adj.): difficult < orðvandr (adj.)

[6] ‑vandr: om. F

notes

[6] orðvandr ‘word-wary’: For the meaning of this word, see Fritzner: orðvandr and NN §967. See also Note to Rv Lv 14/8.

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á ‘in’

3. á (prep.): on, at

notes

[6] á Serklandi ‘in the land of the Saracens’: See Note to Hharð Lv 10/7.

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Serklandi ‘the land of the Saracens’

Serkland (noun n.): shirt-land, land of Saracens, Serkland

notes

[6] á Serklandi ‘in the land of the Saracens’: See Note to Hharð Lv 10/7.

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Skeifr ‘Skeifr (‘Skewed’)’

skeifr (adj.): skewed, aslant

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Hǫgna ‘Hǫgni’s’

Hǫgni (noun m.): [Hǫgni, Högni]

kennings

húfu Hǫgna
‘Hǫgni’s cap ’
   = HELMET

Hǫgni’s cap → HELMET
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húfu ‘cap’

húfa (noun f.; °-u; -ur): [cap]

kennings

húfu Hǫgna
‘Hǫgni’s cap ’
   = HELMET

Hǫgni’s cap → HELMET
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hræddr ‘fearfully’

1. hræddr (adj.): afraid

notes

[8] hræddr ‘fearfully’: Lit. ‘fearful’.

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varliga ‘barely’

varliga (adv.): barely

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brædda ‘to feed’

1. bræða (verb; °-dd-): feed

[8] brædda: bræddar E, bjarta 42ˣ

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

King Sigurðr declares that he never asked Þórarinn to compose a st. about Hákon (see Lv 2 above) and leaves it to Hákon to mete out a suitable punishment for the insult. Hákon stipulates that Þórarinn must compose a st. about Árni.

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