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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Líkn 20VII

George S. Tate (ed.) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Líknarbraut 20’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 250-1.

Anonymous PoemsLíknarbraut
192021

Enn ‘Yet’

2. enn (adv.): still, yet, again

notes

[1] enn ‘yet’: Sveinbjörn Egilsson, Rydberg and Skj B all normalise ms. enn as en ‘but’. As NN §3279 suggests, however, the adv., as opposed to the conj., is appropriate given the cumulation of tortures over the previous sts; cf. similar use of enn in 26/1.

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und ‘under’

3. und (prep.): under, underneath

notes

[1, 2] á síðu und hægri hendi ‘on his side under the right arm’: This specific iconographic detail locating the wound from the lance on the right side accords with the more common medieval tradition. Mꜽle 1958, 190-5 indicates that the wound on the right side represents the founding of the church (Ecclesia), but the tradition is not fixed. See Gurewich 1957, 358-62, who suggests that when on the left, the wound points to Christ’s ‘bleeding heart’. Late medieval Icel. Passion poems vary the position of the wound, either leaving it unspecified but penetrating the heart (Rósa 106), locating it on the right side (Blómarós 55), or on the right but still reaching to the heart (Gimsteinn 55) (ÍM I.2, 29; I.2, 93; I.2, 316).

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hægri ‘the right’

hœgri (adj. comp.): higher, highest

notes

[1, 2] á síðu und hægri hendi ‘on his side under the right arm’: This specific iconographic detail locating the wound from the lance on the right side accords with the more common medieval tradition. Mꜽle 1958, 190-5 indicates that the wound on the right side represents the founding of the church (Ecclesia), but the tradition is not fixed. See Gurewich 1957, 358-62, who suggests that when on the left, the wound points to Christ’s ‘bleeding heart’. Late medieval Icel. Passion poems vary the position of the wound, either leaving it unspecified but penetrating the heart (Rósa 106), locating it on the right side (Blómarós 55), or on the right but still reaching to the heart (Gimsteinn 55) (ÍM I.2, 29; I.2, 93; I.2, 316).

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hendi ‘arm’

hǫnd (noun f.; °handar, dat. hendi; hendr (hendir StatPáll³ 752¹²)): hand

notes

[1, 2] á síðu und hægri hendi ‘on his side under the right arm’: This specific iconographic detail locating the wound from the lance on the right side accords with the more common medieval tradition. Mꜽle 1958, 190-5 indicates that the wound on the right side represents the founding of the church (Ecclesia), but the tradition is not fixed. See Gurewich 1957, 358-62, who suggests that when on the left, the wound points to Christ’s ‘bleeding heart’. Late medieval Icel. Passion poems vary the position of the wound, either leaving it unspecified but penetrating the heart (Rósa 106), locating it on the right side (Blómarós 55), or on the right but still reaching to the heart (Gimsteinn 55) (ÍM I.2, 29; I.2, 93; I.2, 316).

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hyggju ‘the thought’

1. hyggja (noun f.; °-u; -ur): thought, mind < hyggjublíðr (adj.)

kennings

hyggjublíðr konungr jöfra
‘the thought-tender king of princes ’
   = RULER = Christ

the thought-tender king of princes → RULER = Christ

notes

[2] hyggjublíðr ‘thought-tender’: Cf. hugblíðr (also of Christ) in RKet Lv 1IV.

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blíðr ‘tender’

blíðr (adj.; °n. sg. nom. & acc. blítt/blíðt; compar. -ari, superl. -astr): gentle, happy < hyggjublíðr (adj.)

kennings

hyggjublíðr konungr jöfra
‘the thought-tender king of princes ’
   = RULER = Christ

the thought-tender king of princes → RULER = Christ

notes

[2] hyggjublíðr ‘thought-tender’: Cf. hugblíðr (also of Christ) in RKet Lv 1IV.

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á ‘on’

3. á (prep.): on, at

notes

[1, 2] á síðu und hægri hendi ‘on his side under the right arm’: This specific iconographic detail locating the wound from the lance on the right side accords with the more common medieval tradition. Mꜽle 1958, 190-5 indicates that the wound on the right side represents the founding of the church (Ecclesia), but the tradition is not fixed. See Gurewich 1957, 358-62, who suggests that when on the left, the wound points to Christ’s ‘bleeding heart’. Late medieval Icel. Passion poems vary the position of the wound, either leaving it unspecified but penetrating the heart (Rósa 106), locating it on the right side (Blómarós 55), or on the right but still reaching to the heart (Gimsteinn 55) (ÍM I.2, 29; I.2, 93; I.2, 316).

Close

síðu ‘his side’

1. síða (noun f.; °-u; -ur): side

notes

[1, 2] á síðu und hægri hendi ‘on his side under the right arm’: This specific iconographic detail locating the wound from the lance on the right side accords with the more common medieval tradition. Mꜽle 1958, 190-5 indicates that the wound on the right side represents the founding of the church (Ecclesia), but the tradition is not fixed. See Gurewich 1957, 358-62, who suggests that when on the left, the wound points to Christ’s ‘bleeding heart’. Late medieval Icel. Passion poems vary the position of the wound, either leaving it unspecified but penetrating the heart (Rósa 106), locating it on the right side (Blómarós 55), or on the right but still reaching to the heart (Gimsteinn 55) (ÍM I.2, 29; I.2, 93; I.2, 316).

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konungr ‘king’

konungr (noun m.; °dat. -i, -s; -ar): king

kennings

hyggjublíðr konungr jöfra
‘the thought-tender king of princes ’
   = RULER = Christ

the thought-tender king of princes → RULER = Christ
Close

jöfra ‘of princes’

jǫfurr (noun m.): ruler, prince

kennings

hyggjublíðr konungr jöfra
‘the thought-tender king of princes ’
   = RULER = Christ

the thought-tender king of princes → RULER = Christ
Close

Ár ‘abundance’

2. ár (noun n.; °-s; -): year, year’s abundance < árveitir (noun m.)

kennings

eirsanns árveitis ýta;
‘of the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; ’
   = God

the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; → God
Close

veitis ‘giver’

veitir (noun m.): giver < árveitir (noun m.)

kennings

eirsanns árveitis ýta;
‘of the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; ’
   = God

the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; → God
Close

ýta ‘of men’

ýtr (noun m.): man; launcher

kennings

eirsanns árveitis ýta;
‘of the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; ’
   = God

the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; → God
Close

eir ‘of the mercy’

eir (noun f.): mercy < eirsannr (noun m.)

kennings

eirsanns árveitis ýta;
‘of the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; ’
   = God

the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; → God
Close

sanns ‘true’

1. sannr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i;): true < eirsannr (noun m.)

kennings

eirsanns árveitis ýta;
‘of the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; ’
   = God

the mercy-true abundance-giver of men; → God
Close

hugum ‘in their thoughts’

hugr (noun m.): mind, thought, courage

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