Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Þjóð Lv 2I

R. D. Fulk (ed.) 2012, ‘Þjóðólfr ór Hvini, Lausavísur 2’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 65.

Þjóðólfr ór HviniLausavísur
12

fleyja ‘of ships’

2. fley (noun n.; °-s): ship

[1] fleyja: flýja Kˣ, fleyja with flýja in margin 761aˣ

kennings

flatvǫllr fleyja
‘the flat plain of ships ’
   = SEA

the flat plain of ships → SEA
Close

flatvǫllr ‘the flat plain’

flatvǫllr (noun m.): [flat plain]

kennings

flatvǫllr fleyja
‘the flat plain of ships ’
   = SEA

the flat plain of ships → SEA
Close

heðan ‘after this’

heðan (adv.): hence, from this place

notes

[2] heðan ‘after this’: Normally ‘hence’. It is tempting to construe this with fariða ér ‘do not go’ (so, e.g. Uppström 1919, 42). However, as the division of a line into three parts is extremely rare (Reichardt 1928, 155-72 collects examples), it is best to give heðan temporal significance such as þaðan ‘thence, thereafter’ often has (so Kock, NN §§1814E, 2817 anm.).

Close

gettis ‘’

Close

Geitis ‘of Geitir’

Geitir (noun m.): Geitir

[3] Geitis: ‘gettis’ J2ˣ

kennings

vegr Geitis
‘the road of Geitir ’
   = SEA PATH

the road of Geitir → SEA PATH
Close

vegr ‘the road’

1. vegr (noun m.; °-s/-ar, dat. -i/-; -ar/-ir, gen. -a/-na, acc. -a/-i/-u): way, path, side

[3] vegr: veg Kˣ

kennings

vegr Geitis
‘the road of Geitir ’
   = SEA PATH

the road of Geitir → SEA PATH

notes

[3] vegr ‘the road’: Skj B and Skald adopt the acc. form veg found in . Skj B further makes this the object of fariða ér ‘do not go (on)’ and forms an intercalary clause of verpr … grjóti … of sæ stóran ‘stones are tossed over/on the swollen sea’. Kock (NN §143; Skald) simplifies the word order somewhat, taking l. 3 as an intercalary clause with an impersonal verb and an acc. of place, ‘stones are cast on/over Geitir’s road [SEA]’. But adopting nom. vegr, which is found in all the other mss, renders the clearest syntax (so also ÍF 26; Hkr 1991). It also perhaps explains why the sea is said to fling stones, since the vegr may be envisaged as a road surfaced with gravel (Reichardt 1928, 165).

Close

‘Guð’

guð- ((prefix)): [Guð] < Goðrøðr (noun m.): [Guðrøðr]

[4] røðr (‘gvðrꜹðr’): ‘Guð(n)ǫðr’(?) J2ˣ

notes

[4] Górøðr ‘Guðrøðr’: Son of King Haraldr hárfagri ‘Fair-hair’ and foster-son of Þjóðólfr. Although the mss give the first element of his name as Guð-, the variant form Górøðr, with compensatory lengthening upon loss of ð in Goðrøðr (ANG §§123, 292), is required by the aðalhending with stóran ‘big, swollen, stormy’.

Close

Guð(n)ǫðr ‘’

Close

røðr ‘røðr’

-røðr (noun m.): [røðr] < Goðrøðr (noun m.): [Guðrøðr]

[4] røðr (‘gvðrꜹðr’): ‘Guð(n)ǫðr’(?) J2ˣ

notes

[4] Górøðr ‘Guðrøðr’: Son of King Haraldr hárfagri ‘Fair-hair’ and foster-son of Þjóðólfr. Although the mss give the first element of his name as Guð-, the variant form Górøðr, with compensatory lengthening upon loss of ð in Goðrøðr (ANG §§123, 292), is required by the aðalhending with stóran ‘big, swollen, stormy’.

Close

stóran ‘the swollen’

stórr (adj.): large, great

Close

Vindbýsna ‘the wind-portents [storm]’

vindbýsn (noun n.): wind-portent, storm

notes

[5] vindbýsna ‘the wind-portents [storm]’: Eggert Ó. Brím (1895, 25) interprets this to mean ‘culmination of the storm’; see also Finnur Jónsson (1884, 60). LP: vindbýsn (following in part Konráð Gíslason 1892, 48) explains that it means ‘wind-sign’, i.e. ‘sign that the wind is at its fiercest (and will soon abate)’. This may be right, but there is stronger precedent for the meaning if we associate the word with býsnaveðr ‘portentous weather’ (see CVC: býsn) and assume a similar meaning. It makes better sense, too, for Þjóðólfr to warn against departing if the weather is portentous than if the storm is about to abate.

Close

heðan ‘here’

heðan (adv.): hence, from this place

notes

[6] heðan ‘here’: The meaning is normally ‘hence, from here’, but with bíða ‘await’ heðan is often used to mean ‘here’: see CVC: bíða I.

Close

unz ‘until there is’

2. unz (conj.): until

[7] unz: so all others, und F

Close

nús ‘now there is’

nú (adv.): now

Close

Jaðri ‘Jæren’

2. Jaðarr (noun m.): Jæren

notes

[8] Jaðri ‘Jæren’: Guðrøðr’s voyage to Rogaland would take him westwards along Jæren, which lies along the coast in the extreme south-west of Norway. The implication of the final clause is that the weather is even worse off Jæren than it is here in Kvine. The aðalhending of veðr ‘weather’ and Jaðri is permissible because the latter word presumably still had the form *Eðri in Þjóðólfr’s day, fracture not yet having spread from the cases without syncope (Hoffory 1883).

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Þjóðólfr warns his foster-son Guðrøðr ljómi ‘Beam of light’ to delay a voyage from Hvinir (Kvine) to Rogaland till the present storms have passed. The prose following the stanza adds that Guðrøðr sets out all the same, and he and his men perish off Jaðarr (Jæren).

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.