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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Anon Liðs 5I

Russell Poole (ed.) 2012, ‘Anonymous Poems, Liðsmannaflokkr 5’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1022.

Anonymous PoemsLiðsmannaflokkr
456

Hár ‘tall’

3. hár (adj.; °-van; compar. hǽrri, superl. hǽstr): high

notes

[1, 2] hinn jarl ... hár ‘that jarl ... tall’: Identified as Þorkell; see st. 4/2 and Note. The epithet hár for Þorkell, which may connote ‘prominent, outstanding’ (cf. Skj B fremragende) in addition to the literal meaning, will be matched in st. 7/4 by the epithet ríkr ‘mighty, great’ for Knútr; these may already have become the standing nicknames for these two leaders.

Close

hlýra ‘of the brother’

hlýri (noun m.): brother

kennings

hlýra ara,
‘of the brother of the eagle, ’
   = RAVEN/EAGLE

the brother of the eagle, → RAVEN/EAGLE
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es ‘who’

2. er (conj.): who, which, when

notes

[2] es brá ‘who broke’: The pret. continues as the staple tense of the narrative.

Close

brá ‘broke’

bregða (verb; °bregðr/brigðr; brá, brugðu; brugðinn/brogðinn): pull, jerk, break; change

notes

[2] es brá ‘who broke’: The pret. continues as the staple tense of the narrative.

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snarla ‘briskly’

1. snarla (adv.): quickly

Close

mær ‘maiden’

mær (noun f.; °meyjar, dat. meyju; meyjar): maiden

notes

[3] mær spyrr ‘the maiden hears’: On this maiden, see the Introduction. The use of the pres. tense here is from the viewpoint of the end of the campaign (cf. st. 10).

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spyrr ‘hears’

spyrja (verb; spurði): ask; hear, find out

notes

[3] mær spyrr ‘the maiden hears’: On this maiden, see the Introduction. The use of the pres. tense here is from the viewpoint of the end of the campaign (cf. st. 10).

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vitr ‘the wise’

vitr (adj.): wise

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at ‘that’

4. at (conj.): that

[3] at: so DG8, ef Flat

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ara ‘of the eagle’

1. ari (noun m.; °-a; -ar): eagle

kennings

hlýra ara,
‘of the brother of the eagle, ’
   = RAVEN/EAGLE

the brother of the eagle, → RAVEN/EAGLE
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þekkjǫndum ‘to knowers’

þekkjandi (noun m.): [to knowers]

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN
Close

þunn ‘of the thin’

þunnr (adj.): slender, thin < þunnblá (noun n.): ???

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN

notes

[6] þunnblás ‘of the thin linen cord’: This seems to refer to the bow-string. There are no attestations of this sense of the element blá in OWN. Skj B (followed by Skald) emends þunn to Þunns, hence þekkjǫndum blás meginásar Þunns ‘knowers of the dark mighty pole of Þunnr <= Óðinn> [SWORD > WARRIORS]’. But the emendation is unnecessary if we link blá with OEN blaa ‘coarse linen fibre’ (for this word see Falk 1919, 63; Hoffmann 1982, 137). The cpd þunnblá is closely paralleled by Bragi Þórr 6/3III mjótygill ‘slender string’. Bowstrings were often made of linen (Alm 1957, 460) and in poetry can be called simply hǫrr ‘linen’ (LP: hǫrr 2). In kennings for ‘arrow’ strengr ‘string’ is a common determinant and words such as reyr ‘reed’ and vǫlr ‘stick, staff’ occur as base-words (Meissner 146-7). Accordingly, the meginás(s) ‘mighty pole or shaft’ of the ‘thin linen fibre’ denotes the arrow and the complete kenning þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás means ‘experts with arrows’, i.e. ‘bowmen’, in reference to the vikings.

Close

þunn ‘of the thin’

þunnr (adj.): slender, thin < þunnblá (noun n.): ???

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN

notes

[6] þunnblás ‘of the thin linen cord’: This seems to refer to the bow-string. There are no attestations of this sense of the element blá in OWN. Skj B (followed by Skald) emends þunn to Þunns, hence þekkjǫndum blás meginásar Þunns ‘knowers of the dark mighty pole of Þunnr <= Óðinn> [SWORD > WARRIORS]’. But the emendation is unnecessary if we link blá with OEN blaa ‘coarse linen fibre’ (for this word see Falk 1919, 63; Hoffmann 1982, 137). The cpd þunnblá is closely paralleled by Bragi Þórr 6/3III mjótygill ‘slender string’. Bowstrings were often made of linen (Alm 1957, 460) and in poetry can be called simply hǫrr ‘linen’ (LP: hǫrr 2). In kennings for ‘arrow’ strengr ‘string’ is a common determinant and words such as reyr ‘reed’ and vǫlr ‘stick, staff’ occur as base-words (Meissner 146-7). Accordingly, the meginás(s) ‘mighty pole or shaft’ of the ‘thin linen fibre’ denotes the arrow and the complete kenning þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás means ‘experts with arrows’, i.e. ‘bowmen’, in reference to the vikings.

Close

blás ‘linen cord’

2. blá (noun n.): ?linen cord < þunnblá (noun n.): ???

[6] ‑blás: ‘‑blacs’ DG8

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN

notes

[6] þunnblás ‘of the thin linen cord’: This seems to refer to the bow-string. There are no attestations of this sense of the element blá in OWN. Skj B (followed by Skald) emends þunn to Þunns, hence þekkjǫndum blás meginásar Þunns ‘knowers of the dark mighty pole of Þunnr <= Óðinn> [SWORD > WARRIORS]’. But the emendation is unnecessary if we link blá with OEN blaa ‘coarse linen fibre’ (for this word see Falk 1919, 63; Hoffmann 1982, 137). The cpd þunnblá is closely paralleled by Bragi Þórr 6/3III mjótygill ‘slender string’. Bowstrings were often made of linen (Alm 1957, 460) and in poetry can be called simply hǫrr ‘linen’ (LP: hǫrr 2). In kennings for ‘arrow’ strengr ‘string’ is a common determinant and words such as reyr ‘reed’ and vǫlr ‘stick, staff’ occur as base-words (Meissner 146-7). Accordingly, the meginás(s) ‘mighty pole or shaft’ of the ‘thin linen fibre’ denotes the arrow and the complete kenning þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás means ‘experts with arrows’, i.e. ‘bowmen’, in reference to the vikings.

Close

blás ‘linen cord’

2. blá (noun n.): ?linen cord < þunnblá (noun n.): ???

[6] ‑blás: ‘‑blacs’ DG8

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN

notes

[6] þunnblás ‘of the thin linen cord’: This seems to refer to the bow-string. There are no attestations of this sense of the element blá in OWN. Skj B (followed by Skald) emends þunn to Þunns, hence þekkjǫndum blás meginásar Þunns ‘knowers of the dark mighty pole of Þunnr <= Óðinn> [SWORD > WARRIORS]’. But the emendation is unnecessary if we link blá with OEN blaa ‘coarse linen fibre’ (for this word see Falk 1919, 63; Hoffmann 1982, 137). The cpd þunnblá is closely paralleled by Bragi Þórr 6/3III mjótygill ‘slender string’. Bowstrings were often made of linen (Alm 1957, 460) and in poetry can be called simply hǫrr ‘linen’ (LP: hǫrr 2). In kennings for ‘arrow’ strengr ‘string’ is a common determinant and words such as reyr ‘reed’ and vǫlr ‘stick, staff’ occur as base-words (Meissner 146-7). Accordingly, the meginás(s) ‘mighty pole or shaft’ of the ‘thin linen fibre’ denotes the arrow and the complete kenning þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás means ‘experts with arrows’, i.e. ‘bowmen’, in reference to the vikings.

Close

megin ‘of the powerful’

1. megin (noun n.; °-s, dat. magni/megni/megin(HirðB 398¹⁹); -): might, strength; very < megináss (noun m.): [powerful pole]

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN
Close

megin ‘of the powerful’

1. megin (noun n.; °-s, dat. magni/megni/megin(HirðB 398¹⁹); -): might, strength; very < megináss (noun m.): [powerful pole]

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN
Close

ásar ‘pole’

1. áss (noun m.; °ásar/áss, dat. ǽsi/ás; ǽsir/ǽsar, gen. ása/ǽsa, dat. ásum/ǽsum, acc. ásu/ǽsi/ása): rafter, ridge < megináss (noun m.): [powerful pole]

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN
Close

ásar ‘pole’

1. áss (noun m.; °ásar/áss, dat. ǽsi/ás; ǽsir/ǽsar, gen. ása/ǽsa, dat. ásum/ǽsum, acc. ásu/ǽsi/ása): rafter, ridge < megináss (noun m.): [powerful pole]

kennings

þekkjǫndum meginásar þunnblás.
‘to knowers of the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. ’
   = BOWMEN

the powerful pole of the thin linen cord. → ARROW
to knowers of the ARROW → BOWMEN
Close

hǫrð ‘hard’

harðr (adj.; °comp. -ari; superl. -astr): hard, harsh

notes

[7] hǫrð ‘hard’: The same adj. qualifies hríð ‘storm’ designating battles in sts 4/8 and 6/3-4.

Close

Tempsar ‘of the Thames’

Temps (noun f.): [Thames]

[8] Tempsar: ‘tempsáár’ DG8

notes

[8] Tempsar ‘of the Thames’: The DG8 spelling ‘tempsáár’ suggests the gen. sg. of the word á ‘river’ (cf. Note to Ótt Hfl 8/8 and see Townend 1998, 83-4, who also notes the intrusive [p]).

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