skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Sturl Hryn 14II

Valgerður Erna Þorvaldsdóttir (ed.) 2009, ‘Sturla Þórðarson, Hrynhenda 14’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 691-2.

Sturla ÞórðarsonHrynhenda
131415

Norðan ‘from the north’

norðan (adv.): from the north

Close

heldu ‘sailed’

halda (verb): hold, keep

[1] heldu: heldut Flat

Close

alt ‘all the way’

allr (adj.): all

Close

öldur ‘the waves’

alda (noun f.; °; *-ur): wave

[1] öldur: öldar Flat

Close

auðar ‘of wealth’

1. auðr (noun m.; °-s/-ar, dat. -i/-): wealth

[2] auðar lundr: auðlundr Flat

kennings

Lundr auðar,
‘Tree of wealth, ’
   = GENEROUS MAN

Tree of wealth, → GENEROUS MAN
Close

lundr ‘Tree’

1. lundr (noun m.; °-ar, dat. -i/-; -ar): grove, tree

[2] auðar lundr: auðlundr Flat

kennings

Lundr auðar,
‘Tree of wealth, ’
   = GENEROUS MAN

Tree of wealth, → GENEROUS MAN
Close

húfar ‘the hulls’

húfr (noun m.; °dat. -i): hull

notes

[3] húfar treystu drifnar dúfur ‘the hulls tested the foaming waves’: As Konráð Gíslason pointed out (1895-7, I, 77-8), the verb treysta means ‘try the strength of’. It would seem more natural if the waves tested the strength of the hulls rather than the other way around, but all the mss have húfar (m. nom. pl.). Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) emended to húfa (m. acc. pl.) and Konráð claimed he was convinced that húfa was the original reading and dúfur ‘waves’ the subject, but did not emend. Kock disagreed with Finnur and Konráð and pointed out other examples where the hulls test the strength of the waves and not the other way around (NN §2286).

Close

treystu ‘tested’

treysta (verb): trust, believe in

notes

[3] húfar treystu drifnar dúfur ‘the hulls tested the foaming waves’: As Konráð Gíslason pointed out (1895-7, I, 77-8), the verb treysta means ‘try the strength of’. It would seem more natural if the waves tested the strength of the hulls rather than the other way around, but all the mss have húfar (m. nom. pl.). Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) emended to húfa (m. acc. pl.) and Konráð claimed he was convinced that húfa was the original reading and dúfur ‘waves’ the subject, but did not emend. Kock disagreed with Finnur and Konráð and pointed out other examples where the hulls test the strength of the waves and not the other way around (NN §2286).

Close

drifnar ‘the foaming’

2. drífa (verb; °drífr; dreif, drifu; drifinn): drive, rush

notes

[3] húfar treystu drifnar dúfur ‘the hulls tested the foaming waves’: As Konráð Gíslason pointed out (1895-7, I, 77-8), the verb treysta means ‘try the strength of’. It would seem more natural if the waves tested the strength of the hulls rather than the other way around, but all the mss have húfar (m. nom. pl.). Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) emended to húfa (m. acc. pl.) and Konráð claimed he was convinced that húfa was the original reading and dúfur ‘waves’ the subject, but did not emend. Kock disagreed with Finnur and Konráð and pointed out other examples where the hulls test the strength of the waves and not the other way around (NN §2286).

Close

dúfur ‘waves’

1. dúfa (noun f.; °-u; -ur, gen. -na): billow, wave

notes

[3] húfar treystu drifnar dúfur ‘the hulls tested the foaming waves’: As Konráð Gíslason pointed out (1895-7, I, 77-8), the verb treysta means ‘try the strength of’. It would seem more natural if the waves tested the strength of the hulls rather than the other way around, but all the mss have húfar (m. nom. pl.). Finnur Jónsson (Skj B) emended to húfa (m. acc. pl.) and Konráð claimed he was convinced that húfa was the original reading and dúfur ‘waves’ the subject, but did not emend. Kock disagreed with Finnur and Konráð and pointed out other examples where the hulls test the strength of the waves and not the other way around (NN §2286).

Close

Finna ‘of the Saami’

Finnr (noun m.): Saami (person)

Close

Svífa ‘glide’

svífa (verb): sweep

Close

léztu ‘You let’

lata (verb): [You let, be lazy]

[5] léztu: lét 81a, ‘líetzt þu’ 8

Close

hrófi ‘boat-shed’

hróf (noun n.; °-s;): boat-shed

[5] hrófi: ‘hriofí’ 8

Close

hlaðnar ‘the heavily-laden’

2. hlaða (verb): heap, pile

Close

skeiðr ‘warships’

1. skeið (noun f.; °-ar; -r/-ar/-ir): ship

[6] skeiðr: ‘skedur’ 8

Close

á ‘onto’

3. á (prep.): on, at

[6] á: í 8

Close

storðar ‘of the land’

2. storð (noun f.): young wood, earth

kennings

gandr storðar
‘the wolf of the land ’
   = WIND

the wolf of the land → WIND
Close

gandr ‘the wolf’

gandr (noun m.; °-s; dat. *-um): wolf, magic staff

kennings

gandr storðar
‘the wolf of the land ’
   = WIND

the wolf of the land → WIND
Close

fyrir ‘’

fyrir (prep.): for, before, because of

notes

[8] fyrir norðan Elfi ‘north of the Götaälv’: Skj B and Skald construe the prepositional phrase with the first cl. in the helmingr, which is also possible.

Close

Elfi ‘of the Götaälv’

Elfi (noun f.): Götaälv (Elfr)

notes

[8] fyrir norðan Elfi ‘north of the Götaälv’: Skj B and Skald construe the prepositional phrase with the first cl. in the helmingr, which is also possible.

Close

norðan ‘north’

norðan (adv.): from the north

notes

[8] fyrir norðan Elfi ‘north of the Götaälv’: Skj B and Skald construe the prepositional phrase with the first cl. in the helmingr, which is also possible.

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Sturla returns to describing how men came from all over Viken to Tønsberg to join the king on his expedition to Denmark in 1257. According to the st., men came all the way from the Saami settlements in the north.

For this expedition, see also Sturl Hákfl 9 and Giz Hákdr.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.