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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sturl Hákkv 7II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Sturla Þórðarson, Hákonarkviða 7’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 704-5.

Sturla ÞórðarsonHákonarkviða
678

lítlu ‘in small measure’

lítill (adj.; °lítinn): little

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austan ‘east’

austan (adv.): from the east

notes

[4] austan markar ‘east of the forest’: Taken here to mean east of Eidskog, Norway. The gen. pl. form marka (so 42ˣ) could refer to the p. n. Marker (Markir, f. pl.), that is, Aremark, Øymark and Rødenes parishes in Norway and Nordmark in Sweden. Marker also served as a refuge for the Ribbungar.

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markar ‘of the forest’

2. mǫrk (noun f.; °merkr; merkr): forest

[4] markar: marka 42ˣ

notes

[4] austan markar ‘east of the forest’: Taken here to mean east of Eidskog, Norway. The gen. pl. form marka (so 42ˣ) could refer to the p. n. Marker (Markir, f. pl.), that is, Aremark, Øymark and Rødenes parishes in Norway and Nordmark in Sweden. Marker also served as a refuge for the Ribbungar.

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leystan ‘the released’

leysa (verb): release, loosen, redeem

kennings

leystan gram elris
‘the released dog of the alder ’
   = FIRE

the released dog of the alder → FIRE
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hafði ‘had’

hafa (verb): have

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elris ‘of the alder’

elri (noun n.): alder-tree

kennings

leystan gram elris
‘the released dog of the alder ’
   = FIRE

the released dog of the alder → FIRE

notes

[7] gram elris ‘dog of the alder [FIRE]’: See also Sturl Hryn 11/2. Garm ‘dog’ (so F, 42ˣ, Flat) is also possible. Gramr is the methatesised form of garmr (see ANG §315 Anm. 3). Garmr was the dog whose barking foreshadowed the doom of the gods in ON mythology (see Vsp sts 44, 49, 58, NK 10-11, 14).

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gram ‘dog’

garmr (noun m.): dog

[7] gram: garm F, 42ˣ, Flat

kennings

leystan gram elris
‘the released dog of the alder ’
   = FIRE

the released dog of the alder → FIRE

notes

[7] gram elris ‘dog of the alder [FIRE]’: See also Sturl Hryn 11/2. Garm ‘dog’ (so F, 42ˣ, Flat) is also possible. Gramr is the methatesised form of garmr (see ANG §315 Anm. 3). Garmr was the dog whose barking foreshadowed the doom of the gods in ON mythology (see Vsp sts 44, 49, 58, NK 10-11, 14).

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eski ‘with ash-wood’

eski (noun n.; °-s; -): ash-wood, spear

[8] eski: eigi 42ˣ, ekki Flat

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mettan ‘sated’

metta (verb): [sated, is sated]

[8] mettan: mætran F, mætan 42ˣ

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

In the early spring of 1225, Hákon embarked on a campaign to Sweden to punish the people of Värmland, who had given shelter to the Ribbungar and sent bands of robbers across the border to plunder in Norway. On the Saturday before Lent he burned farmsteads in Eda parish, south-east of Charlottenlund in Värmland.

See also Sturl Hákfl 4 and Ólhv Hák 1.

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