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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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SnSt Ht 66III

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2017, ‘Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal 66’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1178.

Snorri SturlusonHáttatal
656667

ítr ‘The splendid’

ítr (adj.): glorious

[2] ítr: út E, 42ˣ, 81a

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hertogi ‘army-leader’

hertogi (noun m.): duke

notes

[2] hertogi ‘army-leader’: For the translation of this word, see Note to st. 40/5 above.

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spjótum ‘with spears’

spjót (noun n.; °-s; -): spear

[2] spjótum: svǫrtum E, 42ˣ, ‘suertum’ 81a, sveitum Flat

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sungu ‘sang’

syngja (verb): sing

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stillis ‘the ruler’s’

stillir (noun m.): ruler

[3] stillis: stilli W

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stóð ‘stood’

standa (verb): stand

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dólgum ‘enemies’

dolgr (noun m.; °dat. -; -ar): enemy, battle

[4] dólgum: dyggjum E, dylgjum F, 42ˣ, 81a, Flat

notes

[4] dólgum ‘enemies’: The variant in F, 42ˣ, 81 a and Flat, dylgjum, can be construed as f. dat. pl. of dylgja ‘enmity, fight, struggle’, but it clearly represents individual scribal attempts at restoring what was perceived to be a lack of aðalhending in this line.

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Hal ‘a man’

halr (noun m.; °-s): man

[5] Hal: all‑ 81a

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lét ‘made’

láta (verb): let, have sth done

[5] lét hǫfði: sló hjǫrvi 304ˣ

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hǫfði ‘by a head’

hǫfuð (noun n.; °-s; -): head

[5] lét hǫfði: sló hjǫrvi 304ˣ

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hoddgrimmr ‘The hoard-grim’

hoddgrimmr (adj.): [hoard-grim]

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jǫfurr ‘prince’

jǫfurr (noun m.): ruler, prince

[6] jǫfurr: jǫfur 304ˣ

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skemra ‘shorter’

skammr (adj.): short

[6] skemra: skemma W, Flat

notes

[6] skemra ‘shorter’: Skemma ‘shorten’ (so W, Flat and F, the latter by correction) is not possible syntactically (that verb takes the acc. and hǫfði ‘by a head’ (l. 5) is in the dat.).

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kann ‘’

kunna (verb): know, can, be able

[7] kann: kannt F, knátt 42ˣ

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rán ‘for plundering’

rán (noun n.; °-s; -): plunder, plundering

[7] rán: rann 81a

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refsa ‘punishes’

1. refsa (verb): punish

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reiðr ‘the angry’

4. reiðr (adj.; °superl. -astr): angry

[8] reiðr: reið 42ˣ

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oddviti ‘war-leader’

oddviti (noun m.): leader

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þjóðum ‘people’

þjóð (noun f.; °-ar, dat. -/-u; -ir): people

[8] þjóðum: skeiðum 81a

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

This variant is called munnvǫrp ‘mouth-throwings’ (i.e. ‘improvisations’), and it is characterised by a lack of internal rhyme in the odd lines and by skothending in the even lines. In Hák, the stanza commemorates Skúli’s battles against the Ribbungar during the winter of 1221-2 (see sts 63-4 above).

This variant is quite common in more informal poetry, and it is the metre used in Bjbp JómsI. See also RvHbreiðm Hl 15-16. — In Hák the stanza is attributed to Snorri Sturluson in all mss (ms. 42ˣ has ‘St.’), but the title of the poem is not given. This is the last stanza documenting historical events that took place in 1221-2, and it is therefore valuable for establishing a date of composition for the poem.

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