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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sjórs Lv 3II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Sigurðr jórsalafari Magnússon, Lausavísur 3’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 468-9.

Sigurðr jórsalafari MagnússonLausavísur
23

Skjótt ‘speedily’

2. skjótr (adj.): quick(ly)

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bark ‘carried’

3. bera (verb; °berr; bar, báru; borinn): bear, carry

[1] bark (‘bar ec’): bar 42ˣ

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skjǫld ‘shield’

skjǫldr (noun m.; °skjaldar/skildar, dat. skildi; skildir, acc. skjǫldu): shield

notes

[1] inn hvíta skjǫld ‘the white shield’: For red and white shields and their significance, see Falk 1914, 128-32. White shields seem to have been less prestigious than red shields and also a sign of peace. That Sigurðr carried a red shield when he returned from the battle not only implies that the shield had been reddened with blood, but also that he had gained honour from the fighting.

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inn ‘the’

2. inn (art.): the

notes

[1] inn hvíta skjǫld ‘the white shield’: For red and white shields and their significance, see Falk 1914, 128-32. White shields seem to have been less prestigious than red shields and also a sign of peace. That Sigurðr carried a red shield when he returned from the battle not only implies that the shield had been reddened with blood, but also that he had gained honour from the fighting.

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hvíta ‘white’

hvítr (adj.; °-an; -ari, -astr): white

notes

[1] inn hvíta skjǫld ‘the white shield’: For red and white shields and their significance, see Falk 1914, 128-32. White shields seem to have been less prestigious than red shields and also a sign of peace. That Sigurðr carried a red shield when he returned from the battle not only implies that the shield had been reddened with blood, but also that he had gained honour from the fighting.

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at ‘that’

4. at (conj.): that

[2] at: á 42ˣ

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valdi ‘prevail’

valda (verb): cause

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eggja ‘of sword-blades’

1. egg (noun f.; °-jar, dat. -ju/-(var. [$1655$]: AM 75 c fol “75 c”, etc.)/-i([$1656$], cf. [$1654$] 243-244); -jar/-jur([$1657$] 16¹³n.)): edge, blade

kennings

skúrar eggja,
‘the shower of sword-blades, ’
   = BATTLE

the shower of sword-blades, → BATTLE
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skúrar ‘the shower’

1. skúr (noun f.; °; -ir): shower

kennings

skúrar eggja,
‘the shower of sword-blades, ’
   = BATTLE

the shower of sword-blades, → BATTLE
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ótrauðr ‘not unwilling’

ótrauðr (adj.): not reluctant

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frá ‘back’

frá (prep.): from

[4] frá: fá 42ˣ

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Þat ‘That’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

[5] Þat: þar F, E, J2ˣ, 42ˣ

notes

[5] þat ‘that’: Skj B and Skald adopt the variant þar ‘there’ (so F, E, J2ˣ, 42ˣ) taken with á Blálandi ‘in Africa’ (l. 6).

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víst ‘’

1. víss (adj.): wise, certain(ly) < handvíss (adj.): [most certainly]

[6] ‑víst: ‑laust H

notes

[6] handvíst ‘sure’: Lit. ‘hand-sure’.

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á ‘in’

3. á (prep.): on, at

notes

[6] á Blálandi ‘in Africa’: Lit. ‘Dark-land’. Usually denotes North Africa. See Note to Bǫlv Hardr 5/4.

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Blálandi ‘Africa’

Bláland (noun n.): North Africa, Africa

notes

[6] á Blálandi ‘in Africa’: Lit. ‘Dark-land’. Usually denotes North Africa. See Note to Bǫlv Hardr 5/4.

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ræðr ‘rules’

ráða (verb): advise, rule, interpret, decide

[7] ræðr: ráði 42ˣ

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svanni ‘woman’

svanni (noun m.): lady, woman

[8] svanni: svanninn F

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King Sigurðr recites this st. about his exploits abroad to Ingibjǫrg Guthormsdóttir, the wife of his brother, King Eysteinn Magnússon.

For Sigurðr’s journey to Palestine and Byzantium, see ESk Sigdr I, Hskv Útkv, Hskv Útdr and Þstf Stuttdr.

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