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skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sigv Lv 29I

Judith Jesch (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Lausavísur 29’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 735.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonLausavísur
282930

lán ‘gift’

lán (noun n.; °-s; -): loan, gift

[3] lán: so all others, ‘sán’ Kˣ

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þingdrífu ‘assembly-attending’

þingdrífr (noun m.): assembly-attending

notes

[4] þingdrífu ‘assembly-attending’: Though unparalleled, the adj. is plainly a derivative of drífa ‘move, drive’. Kock (NN §1121) would emend to þingdrífum in order to have the word modify mǫnnum ‘people’ in l. 1, on the basis of perceived OE parallels. But the epithet more meaningfully describes Magnús, characterizing the boy as kingly.

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drengja ‘of men’

drengr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ir, gen. -ja): man, warrior

kennings

Dróttinn drengja
‘The lord of men ’
   = RULER = Óláfr

The lord of men → RULER = Óláfr

notes

[5] dróttinn drengja ‘the lord of men [RULER = Óláfr]’: Magnús’s father, King Óláfr inn helgi Haraldsson (S. Óláfr).

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dróttinn ‘The lord’

dróttinn (noun m.; °dróttins, dat. dróttni (drottini [$1049$]); dróttnar): lord, master

kennings

Dróttinn drengja
‘The lord of men ’
   = RULER = Óláfr

The lord of men → RULER = Óláfr

notes

[5] dróttinn drengja ‘the lord of men [RULER = Óláfr]’: Magnús’s father, King Óláfr inn helgi Haraldsson (S. Óláfr).

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dýrðar ‘a glorious’

dýrð (noun f.; °-ar/-a(NoDipl(1279) 44²ˆ); -ir): glory < dýrð (noun f.): glory

[6] dýrðar‑: ‘dyrðan’ E

notes

[6] dýrðarson ‘a glorious son’: (a) Literally, dýrðar means ‘of glory’, hence ‘glorious’, and dýrðarson is here taken as a cpd by analogy with numerous later compounds (see LP: dýrð, dýrðar-). (b) In Skj B, as in some earlier analyses, dýrðar is thought to modify feðr ‘father’, though the word order derived from this arrangement is strained. (c) Kock (NN §682) would emend to dýrðir ‘glories’, and, reading nom. sonr for acc. son, advocates the meaning ‘the lord of men would have glories, if the son became like the father’.

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son ‘son’

sonr (noun m.; °-ar, dat. syni; synir, acc. sonu, syni): son < dýrð (noun f.): glory

notes

[6] dýrðarson ‘a glorious son’: (a) Literally, dýrðar means ‘of glory’, hence ‘glorious’, and dýrðarson is here taken as a cpd by analogy with numerous later compounds (see LP: dýrð, dýrðar-). (b) In Skj B, as in some earlier analyses, dýrðar is thought to modify feðr ‘father’, though the word order derived from this arrangement is strained. (c) Kock (NN §682) would emend to dýrðir ‘glories’, and, reading nom. sonr for acc. son, advocates the meaning ‘the lord of men would have glories, if the son became like the father’.

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ef ‘if’

3. ef (conj.): if

[6] ef: er E

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mætti ‘could’

mega (verb): may, might

[7] mætti: má til J2ˣ, E, 761bˣ

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feðr ‘his father’

faðir (noun m.): father

[8] feðr: so all others, ferð Kˣ

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konung ‘a king’

konungr (noun m.; °dat. -i, -s; -ar): king

[8] konung: konungr J2ˣ, E

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slíkan ‘such’

2. slíkr (adj.): such

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As for Lv 28. Sigvatr joins Ástríðr in accompanying Magnús to Norway, and the poet speaks this stanza.

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