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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sigv Vestv 2I

Judith Jesch (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Vestrfararvísur 2’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 618.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonVestrfararvísur
123

Útan ‘outside’

útan (prep.): outside, without

[1] Útan: nátt 325V

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varðk ‘I had to’

1. verða (verb): become, be

[1] varðk: verð 321ˣ, varð 325V

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áðr ‘before’

áðr (adv.; °//): before

[1] áðr: so 73aˣ, 61, 325V, áðr enn Kˣ, Holm2, 972ˣ, 321ˣ, 68, Holm4, þá er Bb, Flat, áðr at Tóm

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Jóta ‘of the Jótar’

jóti (noun m.; °; -ar): one of the Jótar

[1] Jóta: ‘iata’ 73aˣ, Tóm

kennings

stillis Jóta;
‘the ruler of the Jótar; ’
   = DANISH KING = Knútr

the ruler of the Jótar; → DANISH KING = Knútr
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spillín ‘’

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spilli ‘ience’

-spilli (noun n.): [ience] < andspilli (noun n.)

[2] ‑spilli: ‘‑spillín’ Tóm

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fekk’k ‘I got’

2. fá (verb; °fǽr; fekk, fengu; fenginn): get, receive

[2] fekk’k (‘fecc ec’): fekk 61, 325V, Bb, Flat

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stillis ‘the ruler’

stillir (noun m.): ruler

[2] stillis: stillir 325V, Flat

kennings

stillis Jóta;
‘the ruler of the Jótar; ’
   = DANISH KING = Knútr

the ruler of the Jótar; → DANISH KING = Knútr
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millz ‘’

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mæld ‘’

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melld ‘a locked’

3. mella (verb): [a locked]

[3] melld: so Holm2, 972ˣ, 61, 325V, mæld Kˣ, 321ˣ, 73aˣ, 68, Holm4, Bb, Flat, ‘millz’ Tóm

notes

[3] melld ‘locked’: This was first explained in LP (1860): mæld as the p. p. of a verb mella deriving from a noun mella or malla meaning ‘lock, bolt’ (cf. also AEW: mella), and this explanation has been adopted by all eds since, though close parallels are lacking.

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sák ‘I saw’

2. sjá (verb): see

[3] sák (‘sa ec’): sá Holm4, 61, 325V, Bb, Flat, fekk Tóm

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hús ‘building’

hús (noun n.; °-s; -): house

[3] hús: her Kˣ, Holm2, 321ˣ, 73aˣ, 68, herr Holm4, 61, 325V, Bb, Flat, Tóm

notes

[3] hús ‘building’: While some mss spell out her or herr, the main ms. abbreviates the word. Skj A transcribes this as ‘hus’, which is clearly the word needed here, but the abbreviation mark is the scribe’s usual one for -er (as in l. 7 ber) rather than for -us (as in l. 4 hus), and therefore emendation is required. Some of the other mss abbreviate this word, too, and it is likely that an ambiguous abbreviation at an early stage of transmission introduced the confusion.

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fyr ‘in front’

fyr (prep.): for, over, because of, etc.

[3] fyr: ‑fǫr 68, um Tóm

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hauldi ‘of the man’

hǫlðr (noun m.; °-s; -ar): man

[3] hauldi: haulda 972ˣ, hauldum 73aˣ, haldi 61, 325V, Bb, Flat, haldit Tóm

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hús ‘the main’

hús (noun n.; °-s; -): house < húsdyrr (noun f.)

[4] hús‑: her‑ 61, Tóm

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fyrir ‘from’

fyrir (prep.): for, before, because of

[4] fyrir spyrjask: spǫkum hlýra 61

notes

[4] spyrjask fyrir ‘make enquiries’: While the prose word order might suggest that fyrir should be construed with útan ‘from outside’ it is, as Kock (NN §2472) notes, part of the prepositional verb spyrjask fyrir ‘to make enquiries’. Sigvatr uses the same construction in Austv 4/2, 4, in a context which, in a more comic vein, also pictures an approach to a building.

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spyrjask ‘make enquiries’

spyrja (verb; spurði): ask; hear, find out

[4] fyrir spyrjask: spǫkum hlýra 61

notes

[4] spyrjask fyrir ‘make enquiries’: While the prose word order might suggest that fyrir should be construed with útan ‘from outside’ it is, as Kock (NN §2472) notes, part of the prepositional verb spyrjask fyrir ‘to make enquiries’. Sigvatr uses the same construction in Austv 4/2, 4, in a context which, in a more comic vein, also pictures an approach to a building.

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En ‘But’

2. en (conj.): but, and

[5] En eyrendi óru: om. Holm2;    En: áðr 321ˣ, 73aˣ

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ættgǫfugs ‘’

ættgǫfugr (adj.)

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eyrindr ‘’

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eyrendi ‘errand’

1. ørendi (noun n.; °-s; -): errand, news

[5] En eyrendi óru: om. Holm2;    eyrendi: ættgǫfugs 321ˣ, ‘eyrindr’ 61

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óru ‘our [my]’

várr (pron.; °f. ór/vár; pl. órir/várir): our

[5] En eyrendi óru: om. Holm2;    óru: átta 321ˣ, om. Tóm

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ôttugr ‘’

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ôttungr ‘the descendant’

1. áttungr (noun m.; °; -ar): kinsman

[6] ôttungr: ôttugr 325V

kennings

ôttungr Gorms
‘the descendant of Gormr ’
   = DANISH KING = Knútr

the descendant of Gormr → DANISH KING = Knútr
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knátti ‘was able’

knega (verb): to know, understand, be able to

[6] knátti: knátta 321ˣ, knáttu Bb, knúti Flat

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Gorms ‘of Gormr’

Gormr (noun m.): [Gormr, Gorms]

[7] Gorms: grams 61, 325V

kennings

ôttungr Gorms
‘the descendant of Gormr ’
   = DANISH KING = Knútr

the descendant of Gormr → DANISH KING = Knútr
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opt ‘I often’

opt (adv.): often

[7] opt: orms 68

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á ‘on’

3. á (prep.): on, at

[7] á: frá Tóm

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armi ‘my arm’

1. armr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): arm

[7] armi: járni Bb

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járn ‘iron’

járn (noun n.; °-s; -): iron, weapon < járnstúka (noun f.)járn (noun n.; °-s; -): iron, weapon < járnstokkr (noun m.)

[8] járn‑: ‘ꜹr’ 61

notes

[8] járnstúkur ‘iron sleeves’: These could be either chain-mail or protective metal plates such as those found at Birka (Graham-Campbell 1980, 68, 75, 252; Stierna 2001, 40-3). The import of this statement is not clear. In ÍF 27 it is taken to indicate Sigvatr’s readiness to fight against Knútr, but it may rather mean that Sigvatr received armour as a gift from Knútr (cf. st. 5).

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stúkur ‘sleeves’

stúka (noun f.; °-u; -ur): [sleeves] < járnstúka (noun f.)

[8] ‑stúkur: ‑stúka 61, ‑stokkr Tóm

notes

[8] járnstúkur ‘iron sleeves’: These could be either chain-mail or protective metal plates such as those found at Birka (Graham-Campbell 1980, 68, 75, 252; Stierna 2001, 40-3). The import of this statement is not clear. In ÍF 27 it is taken to indicate Sigvatr’s readiness to fight against Knútr, but it may rather mean that Sigvatr received armour as a gift from Knútr (cf. st. 5).

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lúka ‘to conclude’

1. lúka (verb): end, close

[8] lúka: leika 68, om. Tóm

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

In England, Sigvatr goes to King Knútr, who is preparing military action against King Óláfr, to ask him for permission to sail to Norway. The king’s quarters are locked and he has to wait a long time, but eventually gets permission.

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