Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Anon Leið 16VII

Katrina Attwood (ed.) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Leiðarvísan 16’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 155.

Anonymous PoemsLeiðarvísan
151617

rǫngum ‘the rib’

rǫng (noun f.): frame, rib

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP
Close

studdan ‘supported’

studdr (adj./verb p.p.): supported

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP
Close

ramn ‘raven’

hrafn (noun m.; °hrafns; dat. hrafni; hrafnar): raven

[2] ramn: ‘rann’ B, ‘ran’ 624

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP

notes

[2] ramn ‘raven’: B has ‘ran̄’, which one would expect to be expanded ‘rann’, nom. or acc. sg. of rann ‘house’. The 624 scribe, whose exemplar is B, writes ‘ran’. It is not possible to make sense of rann here, and m is required for aðalhending with Glamma. Sveinbjörn Egilsson first made the emendation to ramn in a marginal note to Jón Sigurðsson’s transcript of the 624 text, suggesting that the nasal stroke might have been misplaced, and that the exemplar read ‘rān’. A similar spelling variant (hramn) of hrafn m. ‘raven’ occurs in GSvert Hrafndr 7/3IV. Hramn is probably to be construed as a horse-heiti, after King Áli’s horse of that name; cf. LP: 2. Hrafn.

Close

þjóðtraðar ‘of the highway’

þjóðtrǫð (noun f.)

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP
Close

þjóðtraðar ‘of the highway’

þjóðtrǫð (noun f.)

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP
Close

Glamma ‘of Glammi’

2. Glammi (noun m.): Glammi

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP

notes

[2] Glamma: The sea-king Glammi appears in two of the lists of sækonunga heiti in þulur and in several ship- and sea-kennings (see LP: 2. Glammi).

Close

Glamma ‘of Glammi’

2. Glammi (noun m.): Glammi

kennings

rǫngum studdan ramn þjóðtraðar Glamma,
‘the rib-supported raven of the highway of Glammi, ’
   = SHIP

the highway of Glammi, → SEA
the rib-supported raven of the SEA → SHIP

notes

[2] Glamma: The sea-king Glammi appears in two of the lists of sækonunga heiti in þulur and in several ship- and sea-kennings (see LP: 2. Glammi).

Close

þás ‘once’

2. þá (adv.): then

[5] þás (‘þa er’): þá 624

Close

ǫrk ‘the Ark’

ǫrk (noun f.; °arkar/erkr; erkr): [Ark, chest]

notes

[5] ǫrk ‘[Noah’s] ark’: The only reference to Noah’s Ark in skaldic poetry.

Close

þram ‘rim’

þrǫmr (noun m.; °dat. þremi; gen. þrama): rail, rim < þramvalr (noun m.)

kennings

prúðum þram-Val;
‘the magnificent rim-Valr; ’
   = SHIP

the magnificent rim-Valr; → SHIP

notes

[7] þram-Val ‘rim Valr <horse>’: The cpd is hap. leg., but Valr is named in Anon Kálfv 2/1III as the horse of one Vésteinn, and appears very frequently in ship-kennings (see LP: Valr 2). The word is clearly related to valr, cognate with the first element in OE wealhhafoc ‘hawk, falcon’ (AEW: valr 2). The ornithological resonances shared by the two ship-kennings in this st. make for an interesting parallelism between the helmingar.

Close

Val ‘Valr’

Valr (noun m.; °; -ir): Valr, ?horse < þramvalr (noun m.)

[7] ‑Val: vel 624

kennings

prúðum þram-Val;
‘the magnificent rim-Valr; ’
   = SHIP

the magnificent rim-Valr; → SHIP

notes

[7] þram-Val ‘rim Valr <horse>’: The cpd is hap. leg., but Valr is named in Anon Kálfv 2/1III as the horse of one Vésteinn, and appears very frequently in ship-kennings (see LP: Valr 2). The word is clearly related to valr, cognate with the first element in OE wealhhafoc ‘hawk, falcon’ (AEW: valr 2). The ornithological resonances shared by the two ship-kennings in this st. make for an interesting parallelism between the helmingar.

Close

prúðum ‘the magnificent’

prúðr (adj.; °superl. -astr): magnificent, proud

kennings

prúðum þram-Val;
‘the magnificent rim-Valr; ’
   = SHIP

the magnificent rim-Valr; → SHIP
Close

sótti* ‘proceeded’

sœkja (verb): seek, attack

[8] sótti*: ‘sottizt’ B, 624

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

The story of Noah’s flood is recounted in Gen. VI.9-IX.17. The exodus from the Ark is described in Gen. VIII.13-IX.17. Although the Noah story appears in the Sunday Lists preserved in Pseudo-Wulfstan Sermon XLV and the OIr. Cáin Domnaig, the Flood and the exodus from the Ark occur together, apart from here, only in the MHG homilies (see Introduction; Attwood 2003, 73). — [8]: B’s ‘sottizt’, indicating m.v. sóttisk ‘to be advanced (of a work in hand), be passed (of a road or distance)’, does not fit the context here. Skj B (following a suggestion of Konráð Gíslason mentioned in a n. to Skj A) and Skald emend to sótti* and this is followed here.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.