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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Sigv Víkv 10I

Judith Jesch (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Víkingarvísur 10’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 548.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonVíkingarvísur
91011

fullr ‘complete’

2. fullr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): full, complete

[1] fullr: fylldr 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 68

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fǫgrum ‘beautiful’

fagr (adj.; °fagran; compar. fegri, superl. fegrstr): fair, beautiful

[1] fǫgrum: fǫgru 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, ‘fǫgr[...]’ 325VII

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folk ‘of the battle’

folk (noun n.): people < folkveggr (noun m.)folk (noun n.): people < folkveggr (noun m.)folk (noun n.): people < folkhregg (noun n.)

[2] folk‑: folks‑ R686ˣ, 61, Bb

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

folk ‘of the battle’

folk (noun n.): people < folkveggr (noun m.)folk (noun n.): people < folkveggr (noun m.)folk (noun n.): people < folkhregg (noun n.)

[2] folk‑: folks‑ R686ˣ, 61, Bb

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

veggs ‘wall’

1. veggr (noun m.; °-jar/-s(Páll²A 257³³), dat. -/-i(kun defin.); -ir): wall < folkveggr (noun m.)1. veggr (noun m.; °-jar/-s(Páll²A 257³³), dat. -/-i(kun defin.); -ir): wall < folkveggr (noun m.)

[2] ‑veggs: ‑vegs Holm2, J2ˣ, 78aˣ, 61, 325V, Bb, ‑hreggs 325VII, ‑vegg Tóm

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

veggs ‘wall’

1. veggr (noun m.; °-jar/-s(Páll²A 257³³), dat. -/-i(kun defin.); -ir): wall < folkveggr (noun m.)1. veggr (noun m.; °-jar/-s(Páll²A 257³³), dat. -/-i(kun defin.); -ir): wall < folkveggr (noun m.)

[2] ‑veggs: ‑vegs Holm2, J2ˣ, 78aˣ, 61, 325V, Bb, ‑hreggs 325VII, ‑vegg Tóm

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

drífar ‘’

Close

drífa ‘with a driving’

2. drífa (verb; °drífr; dreif, drifu; drifinn): drive, rush < drífahregg (noun n.)

[2] drífa‑: so papp18ˣ, Holm2, R686ˣ, J2ˣ, 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 68, 61, 75c, 325V, 325VII, Bb, Flat, Tóm, drífar Kˣ

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

hreggi ‘storm’

hregg (noun n.): storm < drífahregg (noun n.)

kennings

drífahreggi folkveggs
‘with a driving storm of the battle-wall ’
   = BATTLE

the battle-wall → SHIELD
with a driving storm of the SHIELD → BATTLE
Close

hilmir ‘the ruler’

hilmir (noun m.): prince, protector

[3] hilmir: hilmi papp18ˣ

Close

mælti ‘commanded’

1. mæla (verb): speak, say

[3] mælti: ‘mellti’ Bb

Close

Hrings ‘Hrings’

2. Hringr (noun m.; °-s): Hringr < Hringsfjǫrðr (noun m.)

[4] Hrings‑: hring‑ J2ˣ, 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 325VII

notes

[4, 5] Hringsfirði; Hóli ‘Hringsfjǫrðr; Hóll’: The context in Hkr suggests that this was in what is now France, and most commentators, following Johnsen (1916, 15-16), have linked this episode with an attack on Dol in Brittany by a certain Olaf, king of the Norwegians, referred to in William of Jumièges’ Gesta Normannorum Ducum (Houts 1992-5, II, 24-7), and have assumed that Hóll is simply an erroneous form of that name. If so, then Hringsfjǫrðr is most likely the estuary of the river Rance, west of Dol, which penetrates deep inland in a fjord-like way. The Fsk compiler does not mention Hringsfjǫrðr, nor cite the stanza, but seems to have known it. Instead of á Hóli, Fsk has á Hœli, and it identifies the vikings (l. 6) there as Danes, as in st. 6 (see Context). An alternative suggestion (Morales Romero 2006, 202-4) is that this location is in Spain, which may have some merit in that the following stanzas are most likely about Spain.

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firði ‘fjǫrðr’

fjǫrðr (noun m.): fjord < Hringsfjǫrðr (noun m.)fjǫrðr (noun m.): fjord < Hringsfjǫrðr (noun m.)

[4] ‑firði: ‑firðir 78aˣ

notes

[4, 5] Hringsfirði; Hóli ‘Hringsfjǫrðr; Hóll’: The context in Hkr suggests that this was in what is now France, and most commentators, following Johnsen (1916, 15-16), have linked this episode with an attack on Dol in Brittany by a certain Olaf, king of the Norwegians, referred to in William of Jumièges’ Gesta Normannorum Ducum (Houts 1992-5, II, 24-7), and have assumed that Hóll is simply an erroneous form of that name. If so, then Hringsfjǫrðr is most likely the estuary of the river Rance, west of Dol, which penetrates deep inland in a fjord-like way. The Fsk compiler does not mention Hringsfjǫrðr, nor cite the stanza, but seems to have known it. Instead of á Hóli, Fsk has á Hœli, and it identifies the vikings (l. 6) there as Danes, as in st. 6 (see Context). An alternative suggestion (Morales Romero 2006, 202-4) is that this location is in Spain, which may have some merit in that the following stanzas are most likely about Spain.

Close

þingat ‘there’

þangat (adv.): there, thither

[4] þingat: þingum 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ

Close

lol ‘’

Close

Ból ‘a high’

ból (noun n.; °-s; -): dwelling

[5] Ból: ‘lol’ R686ˣ, blóð 325V, 325VII, Flat, Tóm

Close

hlóði ‘’

Close

Hóli ‘Hóll’

2. Hól (noun n.): [Hóll]

[5] Hóli: so papp18ˣ, R686ˣ, J2ˣ, 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 68, 61, 75c, Bb, ‘hǫli’ Kˣ, ‘høli’ Holm2, hæli 325V, hlóði 325VII, Flat, hljóði Tóm

notes

[4, 5] Hringsfirði; Hóli ‘Hringsfjǫrðr; Hóll’: The context in Hkr suggests that this was in what is now France, and most commentators, following Johnsen (1916, 15-16), have linked this episode with an attack on Dol in Brittany by a certain Olaf, king of the Norwegians, referred to in William of Jumièges’ Gesta Normannorum Ducum (Houts 1992-5, II, 24-7), and have assumed that Hóll is simply an erroneous form of that name. If so, then Hringsfjǫrðr is most likely the estuary of the river Rance, west of Dol, which penetrates deep inland in a fjord-like way. The Fsk compiler does not mention Hringsfjǫrðr, nor cite the stanza, but seems to have known it. Instead of á Hóli, Fsk has á Hœli, and it identifies the vikings (l. 6) there as Danes, as in st. 6 (see Context). An alternative suggestion (Morales Romero 2006, 202-4) is that this location is in Spain, which may have some merit in that the following stanzas are most likely about Spain.

Close

víkingar ‘the vikings’

víkingr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): viking

notes

[6] víkingar ôttu ‘the vikings owned it’: The abruptness of this clause caused Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), following Sveinbjörn Egilsson, to attach an enclitic rel. pron. (e)s ‘which’ to the preceding word hôtt, giving ‘which vikings owned’. Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 27) assumes a rel. clause in his translation, but does not print the rel. pron. in his text.

Close

ôttu ‘owned it’

2. eiga (verb; °á/eigr (præs. pl. 3. pers. eigu/eiga); átti, áttu; átt): own, have

notes

[6] víkingar ôttu ‘the vikings owned it’: The abruptness of this clause caused Finnur Jónsson (Hkr 1893-1901; Skj B), following Sveinbjörn Egilsson, to attach an enclitic rel. pron. (e)s ‘which’ to the preceding word hôtt, giving ‘which vikings owned’. Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 27) assumes a rel. clause in his translation, but does not print the rel. pron. in his text.

Close

bôðut ‘did not ask’

biðja (verb; °biðr; bað, báðu; beðinn (beiþ- Martin¹ 573‡, bỏþ- HákEirsp 661‰, cf. ed. intr. xl)): ask for, order, pray

[7] bôðut: buðu R686ˣ, bôðu J2ˣ, 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 68, Flat, Tóm, báðir 325VII, bôðuð Bb

Close

síðan ‘after that’

síðan (adv.): later, then

Close

slíks ‘for such’

2. slíkr (adj.): such

[8] slíks: slíkt 325VII, Flat, Tóm

Close

kostnaðar ‘’

kostnaðr (noun m.)

Close

skotnaðar ‘luck’

2. skotnaðr (noun m.): [luck]

[8] skotnaðar: kostnaðar 325V

notes

[8] skotnaðar ‘luck’: This is gen. sg. of a word skotnuðr or skotnaðr which occurs only here but must derive from the impersonal verb skotna ‘to get a piece of good luck or gain’ (CVC: skotna).

Close

brotna ‘destroyed’

brotna (verb; °-að-): break, burst

[8] brotna: so Holm2, R686ˣ, J2ˣ, 325VI, 73aˣ, 78aˣ, 68, 61, 75c, 325V, 325VII, Bb, Flat, Tóm, þrotna Kˣ, papp18ˣ

notes

[8] brotna ‘destroyed’: An inf. dependent on lét ‘had’. This, the reading of all ÓH mss, is more apt in context than þrotna ‘dwindle, come to an end’ in the K transcripts.

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

After the death of Aðalráðr (Æthelred), Óláfr heads suðr um sjá ‘south across the sea’. He fights a battle in Hringsfjǫrðr and captures and destroys a castle at Hóll.

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