skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Sigv Nesv 3I

Russell Poole (ed.) 2012, ‘Sigvatr Þórðarson, Nesjavísur 3’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 561.

Sigvatr ÞórðarsonNesjavísur
234

unnc ‘’

Close

erumk ‘to me’

2. vera (verb): be, is, was, were, are, am

[1] erumk: ‘er unnc ⸜(ø)m⸝’(?) papp18ˣ, er af 61, er Flat, er oss FskAˣ

Close

kunnt ‘known’

kunna (verb): know, can, be able

[1] kunnt: ‘knítt’ 73aˣ, kunnr Tóm

notes

[1] kunnt … hvé kennir ‘known … how the master’: Another juxtaposition of etymologically related words (see Note to st. 2/1). 

Close

hvé ‘how’

hvé (conj.): how

[1] hvé: hver Bb, hvé corrected from er DG8

notes

[1] kunnt … hvé kennir ‘known … how the master’: Another juxtaposition of etymologically related words (see Note to st. 2/1). 

Close

kennir ‘the master’

kennir (noun m.): teacher

[1] kennir: ‘kæmner’ FskBˣ

kennings

kennir frosts odda
‘the master of the frost of points ’
   = WARRIOR

the frost of points → BATTLE
the master of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[1] kunnt … hvé kennir ‘known … how the master’: Another juxtaposition of etymologically related words (see Note to st. 2/1). 

Close

Karl ‘Karl’

karl (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): (old) man < karlhǫfði (noun m.)karl (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): (old) man < karlhǫfði (noun m.)karl (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): (old) man < karlhǫfði (noun m.)

[2] Karl‑: karla‑ papp18ˣ, R686ˣ, Karls‑ 972ˣ, ‘[...]rl‑’ Tóm

notes

[2] Karlhǫfða ‘Karlhǫfði (“Man-head”)’: Viking Age ships were most often named after animals (Jesch 2001a, 136-7). Snorri (ÍF 27, 59) explains Karlhǫfði as being named after a king’s head figurehead carved by King Óláfr himself, which set a fashion for rulers’ ships. Jesch (2001a, 137) inclines instead to the suggestion of Paasche (1914, 13) that the ship-name was influenced by Óláfr’s royal model Charlemagne (ON Karlamagnús).

Close

hǫfða ‘hǫfði (‘Man-head’)’

hǫfði (noun m.): Man-head < karlhǫfði (noun m.)hǫfði (noun m.): Man-head < karlshǫfði (noun m.)

[2] ‑hǫfða: ‑hǫfðann 73aˣ, 61, ‑hǫfði Tóm

notes

[2] Karlhǫfða ‘Karlhǫfði (“Man-head”)’: Viking Age ships were most often named after animals (Jesch 2001a, 136-7). Snorri (ÍF 27, 59) explains Karlhǫfði as being named after a king’s head figurehead carved by King Óláfr himself, which set a fashion for rulers’ ships. Jesch (2001a, 137) inclines instead to the suggestion of Paasche (1914, 13) that the ship-name was influenced by Óláfr’s royal model Charlemagne (ON Karlamagnús).

Close

odda ‘of points’

oddr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): point of weapon

[3] odda: eggja 61, orða DG8

kennings

kennir frosts odda
‘the master of the frost of points ’
   = WARRIOR

the frost of points → BATTLE
the master of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[3] frosts odda ‘of the frost of points [BATTLE]’: This use of frost evidently confused copyists, and its only analogue in a kenning is SnSt Ht 61/3III. Base-words in this kenning type normally denote dynamic weather phenomena, e.g. hagl ‘hail’, él ‘blizzard’ and þeyr ‘thawing wind’ (Meissner 178-82), rather than static ones such as frost. (LP: frost takes the word in Sveinn Norðrdr 1/3III as ‘mountain storm’ but this is uncertain.)

Close

odda ‘of points’

oddr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): point of weapon

[3] odda: eggja 61, orða DG8

kennings

kennir frosts odda
‘the master of the frost of points ’
   = WARRIOR

the frost of points → BATTLE
the master of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[3] frosts odda ‘of the frost of points [BATTLE]’: This use of frost evidently confused copyists, and its only analogue in a kenning is SnSt Ht 61/3III. Base-words in this kenning type normally denote dynamic weather phenomena, e.g. hagl ‘hail’, él ‘blizzard’ and þeyr ‘thawing wind’ (Meissner 178-82), rather than static ones such as frost. (LP: frost takes the word in Sveinn Norðrdr 1/3III as ‘mountain storm’ but this is uncertain.)

Close

froz ‘’

Close

p̄tz ‘’

Close

frorz ‘’

Close

frosts ‘of the frost’

frost (noun n.): frost

[3] frosts: ‘frorz’ Holm2, frost 972ˣ, 325VI, 321ˣ, 78aˣ, DG8, frests 68, ‘tfrost’ Bb, ‘p̄tz’ Tóm, ‘froz’ FskBˣ, fróns FskAˣ

kennings

kennir frosts odda
‘the master of the frost of points ’
   = WARRIOR

the frost of points → BATTLE
the master of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[3] frosts odda ‘of the frost of points [BATTLE]’: This use of frost evidently confused copyists, and its only analogue in a kenning is SnSt Ht 61/3III. Base-words in this kenning type normally denote dynamic weather phenomena, e.g. hagl ‘hail’, él ‘blizzard’ and þeyr ‘thawing wind’ (Meissner 178-82), rather than static ones such as frost. (LP: frost takes the word in Sveinn Norðrdr 1/3III as ‘mountain storm’ but this is uncertain.)

Close

frosts ‘of the frost’

frost (noun n.): frost

[3] frosts: ‘frorz’ Holm2, frost 972ˣ, 325VI, 321ˣ, 78aˣ, DG8, frests 68, ‘tfrost’ Bb, ‘p̄tz’ Tóm, ‘froz’ FskBˣ, fróns FskAˣ

kennings

kennir frosts odda
‘the master of the frost of points ’
   = WARRIOR

the frost of points → BATTLE
the master of the BATTLE → WARRIOR

notes

[3] frosts odda ‘of the frost of points [BATTLE]’: This use of frost evidently confused copyists, and its only analogue in a kenning is SnSt Ht 61/3III. Base-words in this kenning type normally denote dynamic weather phenomena, e.g. hagl ‘hail’, él ‘blizzard’ and þeyr ‘thawing wind’ (Meissner 178-82), rather than static ones such as frost. (LP: frost takes the word in Sveinn Norðrdr 1/3III as ‘mountain storm’ but this is uncertain.)

Close

agðr ‘’

Close

Agðir ‘Agder’

Agðir (noun f.): [as Agder, Agder]

[4] Agðir: ‘agðr’ R686ˣ, J1ˣ

Close

of ‘put in’

4. of (particle): (before verb)

[4] of (‘um’): corrected from inn DG8

Close

lagðan ‘position’

leggja (verb): put, lay

[4] lagðan: lagði 325V, lagða Flat

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

ÓH-Hkr introduces the stanza after st. 2 (see Note to st. 3 [All] below). ÓHLeg introduces it after st. 6, explaining how the ships were brought together. The stanza is followed by a general summary of the battle. Fsk places st. 3 first in its account of the battle and describes how King Óláfr, despite having a smaller force than the jarl, brings his ship Karlhǫfði alongside the jarl’s and ties the prows together. The battle is noted to have been on Palm Sunday.

Fsk and ÓH-Hkr identify the source poem as Nesjavísur, in which Sigvatr tells in detail of the battle. It is specified in ÓH-Hkr that Sigvatr was present at the battle and composed the poem, a flokkr, the summer immediately after.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.