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skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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RvHbreiðm Hl 67III

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2017, ‘Rǫgnvaldr jarl and Hallr Þórarinsson, Háttalykill 67’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1076.

Rǫgnvaldr jarl and Hallr ÞórarinssonHáttalykill
666768

gný ‘clamour’

gnýr (noun m.): din, tumult

kennings

grimman gný peitu;
‘a grim clamour of the spear; ’
   = BATTLE

a grim clamour of the spear; → BATTLE
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grimman ‘a grim’

grimmr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): fierce

kennings

grimman gný peitu;
‘a grim clamour of the spear; ’
   = BATTLE

a grim clamour of the spear; → BATTLE
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peitu ‘of the spear’

peita (noun f.): spear

[2] peitu: ‘væitu’ papp25ˣ, R683ˣ

kennings

grimman gný peitu;
‘a grim clamour of the spear; ’
   = BATTLE

a grim clamour of the spear; → BATTLE

notes

[2] peitu ‘of the spear’: Rugman again mistook <p> in peitu ‘spear’ for insular <v>. See Note to st. 18/6.

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hagl ‘hail’

hagl (noun n.; °-s; dat. *-um): hail

[3] hagl: so R683ˣ, ‘Halg’ papp25ˣ

kennings

hagl skóðs
‘hail of the weapon ’
   = ARROWS

hail of the weapon → ARROWS
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skóðs ‘of the weapon’

2. skóð (noun n.): harmer, scathe

[3] skóðs: ‘scọ\ḳ/g̣s’ papp25ˣ, ‘scogs’ R683ˣ

kennings

hagl skóðs
‘hail of the weapon ’
   = ARROWS

hail of the weapon → ARROWS

notes

[3] skóðs ‘of the weapon’: The readings of both mss can be normalised as skógs (m. gen. sg.) ‘of the forest’ (for that gen. form, see Finnur Jónsson 1901, 9-10), but the form of the word in papp25ˣ (‘scọ\ḳ/g̣s’) shows that Rugman was uncertain of the transcription. Skj B and Skald retain skógs and take it to mean ‘bow’ (see LP: 2. skógr). However, the word is otherwise not attested in that meaning (see the discussion in Hl 1941), and retention of the word also causes the line to have three internal rhymes. Holtsmark (Hl 1941) suggests a tentative emendation to skass ‘troll-woman’ (hagl skass ‘the hail of the troll-woman’, i.e. ‘arrows’), while Jón Helgason (ibid.) supplies skóðs ‘dangerous weapon’ i.e. ‘bow’, which is closer to the ms. reading and preferred in the present edn.

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á ‘against’

3. á (prep.): on, at

[3] á: í R683ˣ

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Skǫglar ‘of Skǫgul’

Skǫgul (noun f.): Skǫgul

kennings

tjaldi Skǫglar;
‘the tent of Skǫgul; ’
   = SHIELD

the tent of Skǫgul; → SHIELD
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tjaldi ‘the tent’

tjald (noun n.; °-s; *-): tent, awning

kennings

tjaldi Skǫglar;
‘the tent of Skǫgul; ’
   = SHIELD

the tent of Skǫgul; → SHIELD
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Sókn ‘battle’

sókn (noun f.; °-ar; -ir): attack, fight < sóknbjartr (adj.)

[5] Sókn‑: so R683ˣ, ‘Soon‑’ papp25ˣ

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snyrtir ‘The polished one’

snyrtir (noun m.): polisher

notes

[5] snyrtir ‘the polished one’: This is a heiti for ‘sword’ (Þul Sverða 1/7).

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sverð ‘the sword’

sverð (noun n.; °-s; -): sword

[6] sverð: so R683ˣ, sverðs papp25ˣ

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hringr ‘the ringed one’

1. hringr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ar): ring; sword

notes

[7] hringr ‘the ringed one’: Another heiti for ‘sword’, see Note to st. 41/1.

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horskra ‘of wise’

horskr (adj.; °compar. -ari): wise

[7] horskra: ‘hærscra’ papp25ˣ, R683ˣ

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hjǫr ‘the sword’

hjǫrr (noun m.): sword

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fjǫrvi ‘the life’

fjǫr (noun n.): life

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

The heading is tilsegjandi (‘Til sægiande’) ‘annotating’ (cf. SnSt Ht 25 tilsagt ‘annotated’). It is a dróttkvætt variant characterised by parenthetic clauses in positions 1-4 in the even lines (st. 68/8 is an exception).

Although parenthetic clauses are a staple of dróttkvætt poetry, the particular systematised use of such annotations is found only here and in Ht. The annotations are interesting with their explicit self-reflective comments on the use of skaldic diction. — Sveinn is Sveinn tjúguskegg ‘Fork-beard’ Haraldsson, king of Denmark and England (d. 1014). See ÍF 35, 96-8. It is interesting that Sveinn is considered king of Norway after the death of Haraldr gráfeldr (d. c. 970). The effective ruler of Norway was Hákon, jarl of Lade (d. 995; see Anon Nkt 17-18II and his Biography in SkP I).

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