Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Mark Eirdr 5II

Jayne Carroll (ed.) 2009, ‘Markús Skeggjason, Eiríksdrápa 5’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 437-8.

Markús SkeggjasonEiríksdrápa
456

Drengir ‘The warriors’

drengr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ir, gen. -ja): man, warrior

notes

[1] drengir ‘warriors’: For this meaning of the word, see Goetting 2006.

Close

af ‘from’

af (prep.): from

[1] af: at 20b I, 180b

notes

[1] af ‘from’: Skj B, Skald and ÍF 35 all prefer at ‘from’ (so 20b I, 180b), which is also possible.

Close

ǫrr ‘the generous’

ǫrr (adj.): generous, brave

Close

knǫrru ‘merchantships’

knǫrr (noun m.; °knarrar, dat. knerri; knerrir, acc. knǫrru/knerri): (a kind of) ship

notes

[2] knǫrru ‘merchantships’: See Note to Steinn Óldr 13/2.

Close

opt ‘often’

opt (adv.): often

Close

armleggjar ‘of the arm’

armleggr (noun m.; °dat. -/-i; -ir, gen. -ja, dat. -jum/-um(var. ÆvMi𲉠76⁴ „ Æv AM 240XV fol 1r¹Š)): upper arm

kennings

rǫf armleggjar.
‘the amber of the arm. ’
   = GOLD

the amber of the arm. → GOLD
Close

rǫf ‘the amber’

rǫf (noun f.): amber

kennings

rǫf armleggjar.
‘the amber of the arm. ’
   = GOLD

the amber of the arm. → GOLD
Close

dýrðar ‘glorious’

dýrð (noun f.; °-ar/-a(NoDipl(1279) 44²ˆ); -ir): glory

[4] dýrðar: dýrum 180b

notes

[4] dýrðarseggjum ‘glorious men’: Dýrum seggjum ‘precious men’ (so 180b) is also possible but clearly a later simplification. The cpd dýrðarseggjum is a hap. leg. See also Note to st. 3/1 above.

Close

seggjum ‘men’

seggr (noun m.; °; -ir): man

notes

[4] dýrðarseggjum ‘glorious men’: Dýrum seggjum ‘precious men’ (so 180b) is also possible but clearly a later simplification. The cpd dýrðarseggjum is a hap. leg. See also Note to st. 3/1 above.

Close

Hringum ‘rings’

1. hringr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -; -ar): ring; sword

notes

[5] eyddi hringum ‘destroyed rings’: I.e. he distributed treasures.

Close

eyddi ‘destroyed’

2. eyða (verb; °-dd-): destroy

notes

[5] eyddi hringum ‘destroyed rings’: I.e. he distributed treasures.

Close

harra ‘of lords’

1. harri (noun m.; °-a): lord

kennings

Hildarramr sløngvir harra
‘The battle-mighty disperser of lords ’
   = RULER

The battle-mighty disperser of lords → RULER

notes

[5] harra (m. gen. pl.) ‘of lords’: Earlier eds follow Skj B in emending harra to hodda ‘treasures’ (sløngvir hodda ‘the distributor of treasures’, i.e. ‘generous king’), presumably because sløngvir ‘disperser’ is normally qualified by inanimate determinants, especially ones referring to ‘treasure’. Given the ring-distributing context, this is appropriate if tautologous. However, all mss agree on harra, and LP: sløngvir offers a feasible extended meaning for the base-word sløngvir, coupled with harra: som fælder konger (jager dem bort) ‘who fells kings (drives them away)’.

Close

sløngvir ‘disperser’

sløngvir (noun m.): slinger

[5] sløngvir: so 20b I, 180b, sløngvit JÓ, 873ˣ

kennings

Hildarramr sløngvir harra
‘The battle-mighty disperser of lords ’
   = RULER

The battle-mighty disperser of lords → RULER
Close

hildar ‘The battle’

1. hildr (noun f.): battle

kennings

Hildarramr sløngvir harra
‘The battle-mighty disperser of lords ’
   = RULER

The battle-mighty disperser of lords → RULER
Close

ramr ‘mighty’

rammr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): mighty

kennings

Hildarramr sløngvir harra
‘The battle-mighty disperser of lords ’
   = RULER

The battle-mighty disperser of lords → RULER
Close

stillir ‘the controller’

stillir (noun m.): ruler

kennings

stillir stóls Fróða
‘the controller of Fróði’s seat ’
   = Eiríkr

Fróði’s seat → Denmark
the controller of DENMARK → Eiríkr
Close

kyn ‘the kin’

1. kyn (noun n.; °-s; -): kin

[7] kyn: so 20b I, 180b, kyns JÓ, 873ˣ

Close

svát ‘so that’

svát (conj.): so that, so as

[7] svát (‘svá at’): at 180b

Close

Fróða ‘of Fróði’s’

Fróði (noun m.): Fróði

kennings

stillir stóls Fróða
‘the controller of Fróði’s seat ’
   = Eiríkr

Fróði’s seat → Denmark
the controller of DENMARK → Eiríkr

notes

[8] stóls Fróða ‘of Fróði’s seat [= Denmark]’: There are several legendary kings named Fróði (see SnE 1998, II, 460). Here two are most likely alluded to: the Fróði I (inn friðgóði ‘the peaceful’) of the Dan. Skjǫldungr dynasty (ÍF 35, liv-lv, 14) and the legendary figure associated with Fróði’s mill, who sets the two giantesses Fenja and Menja to grind gold for him, as told in Grottasǫngr (Grott, see SnE 1998, I, 51-7). Thus stóls Fróða not only refers to Eiríkr’s Dan. realm, but also to the wealth which is his to disperse. It is possible, although less satisfactory, to take this phrase as qualifying fyrða kyn: kyn fyrða stóls Fróða ‘the kin of men of Fróði’s seat’ i.e. ‘Danes’.

Close

Fróða ‘of Fróði’s’

Fróði (noun m.): Fróði

kennings

stillir stóls Fróða
‘the controller of Fróði’s seat ’
   = Eiríkr

Fróði’s seat → Denmark
the controller of DENMARK → Eiríkr

notes

[8] stóls Fróða ‘of Fróði’s seat [= Denmark]’: There are several legendary kings named Fróði (see SnE 1998, II, 460). Here two are most likely alluded to: the Fróði I (inn friðgóði ‘the peaceful’) of the Dan. Skjǫldungr dynasty (ÍF 35, liv-lv, 14) and the legendary figure associated with Fróði’s mill, who sets the two giantesses Fenja and Menja to grind gold for him, as told in Grottasǫngr (Grott, see SnE 1998, I, 51-7). Thus stóls Fróða not only refers to Eiríkr’s Dan. realm, but also to the wealth which is his to disperse. It is possible, although less satisfactory, to take this phrase as qualifying fyrða kyn: kyn fyrða stóls Fróða ‘the kin of men of Fróði’s seat’ i.e. ‘Danes’.

Close

stóls ‘seat’

1. stóll (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i/-; -ar): seat, throne

kennings

stillir stóls Fróða
‘the controller of Fróði’s seat ’
   = Eiríkr

Fróði’s seat → Denmark
the controller of DENMARK → Eiríkr

notes

[8] stóls Fróða ‘of Fróði’s seat [= Denmark]’: There are several legendary kings named Fróði (see SnE 1998, II, 460). Here two are most likely alluded to: the Fróði I (inn friðgóði ‘the peaceful’) of the Dan. Skjǫldungr dynasty (ÍF 35, liv-lv, 14) and the legendary figure associated with Fróði’s mill, who sets the two giantesses Fenja and Menja to grind gold for him, as told in Grottasǫngr (Grott, see SnE 1998, I, 51-7). Thus stóls Fróða not only refers to Eiríkr’s Dan. realm, but also to the wealth which is his to disperse. It is possible, although less satisfactory, to take this phrase as qualifying fyrða kyn: kyn fyrða stóls Fróða ‘the kin of men of Fróði’s seat’ i.e. ‘Danes’.

Close

stóls ‘seat’

1. stóll (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i/-; -ar): seat, throne

kennings

stillir stóls Fróða
‘the controller of Fróði’s seat ’
   = Eiríkr

Fróði’s seat → Denmark
the controller of DENMARK → Eiríkr

notes

[8] stóls Fróða ‘of Fróði’s seat [= Denmark]’: There are several legendary kings named Fróði (see SnE 1998, II, 460). Here two are most likely alluded to: the Fróði I (inn friðgóði ‘the peaceful’) of the Dan. Skjǫldungr dynasty (ÍF 35, liv-lv, 14) and the legendary figure associated with Fróði’s mill, who sets the two giantesses Fenja and Menja to grind gold for him, as told in Grottasǫngr (Grott, see SnE 1998, I, 51-7). Thus stóls Fróða not only refers to Eiríkr’s Dan. realm, but also to the wealth which is his to disperse. It is possible, although less satisfactory, to take this phrase as qualifying fyrða kyn: kyn fyrða stóls Fróða ‘the kin of men of Fróði’s seat’ i.e. ‘Danes’.

Close

af ‘through’

af (prep.): from

Close

góðir ‘wealthy’

góðr (adj.): good

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

The st. illustrates Eiríkr’s munificence.

For a similar display of royal generosity, see Steinn Óldr 13-16.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.