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skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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HSn Lv 1II

Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Hallr Snorrason, Lausavísur 1’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 636-7.

Hallr SnorrasonLausavísur
12

Glym ‘the resounding’

glymr (noun m.): noise < glymvǫllr (noun m.)

[1] Glym‑: ‘Glum‑’ E

kennings

glymvǫllu Róða
‘the resounding field of Róði ’
   = SEA

the resounding field of Róði → SEA
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vǫllu ‘field’

vǫllr (noun m.; °vallar, dat. velli; vellir acc. vǫllu/velli): plain, field < glymvǫllr (noun m.)

[1] ‑vǫllu: ‑vǫll Flat

kennings

glymvǫllu Róða
‘the resounding field of Róði ’
   = SEA

the resounding field of Róði → SEA
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góð ‘good’

góðr (adj.): good

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stillis ‘leader’

stillir (noun m.): ruler

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Róða ‘of Róði’

Róði (noun m.): Róði

[2] Róða: rósa E

kennings

glymvǫllu Róða
‘the resounding field of Róði ’
   = SEA

the resounding field of Róði → SEA
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Óláfssúð ‘Óláfssúð (‘Óláfr’s ship’)’

óláfssúð (noun f.): Óláfr’s ship

notes

[3] Óláfssúð ‘(“Óláfr’s ship”)’: The name of Magnús’s ship, which Sverrir captured at the battle of Kalvskinnet (19 June 1179), when Magnús’s father, Erlingr skakki ‘the Tilting’, fell (ÍF 30, 61). Magnús recaptured it in 1181 (see Context above). The ship was dedicated to S. Óláfr (for that practice, see Falk 1912, 32). For súð ‘ship’, see Note to Hharð Gamv 2/2. Skj B emends Óláfs to álfúrs ‘of the sea-fire’ (i.e. ‘of gold’) and takes this cpd as a determinant in a kenning for ‘generous man’ in which the base-word is the variant form eyði (m. dat. sg.) ‘destroyer’ from Flat (und eyði álfúrs ‘beneath the destroyer of sea-fire’). That reading requires an unnecessary emendation and the adoption of a variant that goes against the other ms. witnesses (see NN §1983). There is also a play on auði ‘riches’ (l. 3) and auðgrimms ‘of the wealth-fierce’ (l. 4) which is lost if the Flat reading is chosen.

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und ‘bearing’

3. und (prep.): under, underneath

notes

[3] und ‘bearing’: Lit. ‘under’.

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auði ‘riches’

1. auðr (noun m.; °-s/-ar, dat. -i/-): wealth

[3] auði: eyði Flat

notes

[3] auði ‘riches’: Refers to the loot taken by Magnús.

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auðgrimms ‘of the wealth-fierce’

auðgrimmr (adj.): [wealth-fierce]

notes

[4] auðgrimms ‘of the wealth-fierce’: I.e. a person who is destroying wealth by distributing it to his men, a generous person.

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Nús ‘Now’

nú (adv.): now

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œgr ‘the awe-inspiring’

œgr (adj.): awe-inspiring, fearsome

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ór ‘from’

3. ór (prep.): out of

[5] ór: né E

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fellr ‘sinks’

falla (verb): fall

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húfr ‘ship-side’

húfr (noun m.; °dat. -i): hull

notes

[6] húfr ‘ship-side’: See Note to Mberf Lv 1/3.

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svig ‘the curve’

svig (noun n.; °-s; -): [curve, bays]

[6] svig: ‘suik’ E, svíf 81a

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svelldr ‘the bloated’

1. svella (verb): swell

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Magnús Erlingsson travels by ship to Bergen after having looted Sverrir Sigurðarson’s stronghold in Trondheim (November 1181). On that occasion, Magnús took possession of Sverrir’s ships, which he either burned or brought with him (ÍF 30, 101). Hallr accompanies Magnús on the journey.

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