skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Gamlkan Has 60VII

Katrina Attwood (ed.) 2007, ‘Gamli kanóki, Harmsól 60’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 126-7.

Gamli kanókiHarmsól
596061

Vættik ‘I hope’

vætta (verb): expect

Close

himins ‘of heaven’s’

himinn (noun m.; °himins, dat. himni; himnar): heaven, sky

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

himins ‘of heaven’s’

himinn (noun m.; °himins, dat. himni; himnar): heaven, sky

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

birti ‘brightness’

birti (noun f.; °-): brightness

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

birti ‘brightness’

birti (noun f.; °-): brightness

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

ins ‘of the’

2. inn (art.): the

[3] ins hæsta: ‘e[...]hęs[...]’ B, ‘e(ns) hęsta’(?) 399a‑bˣ

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

hæsta ‘highest’

hœgri (adj. comp.): higher, highest

[3] ins hæsta: ‘e[...]hęs[...]’ B, ‘e(ns) hęsta’(?) 399a‑bˣ

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God
Close

hildings ‘prince’

hildingr (noun m.; °; -ar): king, ruler

[4] hildings: ‘h[...]’ B, ‘h(illdings)’(?) 399a‑bˣ

kennings

ins hæsta hildings himins birti,
‘of the highest prince of heaven’s brightness, ’
   = God

heaven’s brightness, → SUN
the highest prince of the SUN → God

notes

[4] hildings ‘prince’s’: Although the 399a-bˣ copyist is not certain of the reading, the reconstruction here is confirmed by aðalhending with mildi.

Close

hauðrs ‘of the land’

hauðr (noun n.): earth, ground

kennings

grams hauðrs glyggs.
‘of the prince of the land of the wind.’
   = God

the land of the wind. → SKY/HEAVEN
the prince of the SKY/HEAVEN → God

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

hauðrs ‘of the land’

hauðr (noun n.): earth, ground

kennings

grams hauðrs glyggs.
‘of the prince of the land of the wind.’
   = God

the land of the wind. → SKY/HEAVEN
the prince of the SKY/HEAVEN → God

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

hugga ‘comfort’

hugga (verb): comfort

Close

grams ‘of the prince’

1. gramr (noun m.): ruler

kennings

grams hauðrs glyggs.
‘of the prince of the land of the wind.’
   = God

the land of the wind. → SKY/HEAVEN
the prince of the SKY/HEAVEN → God

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

kastali ‘fortress’

kastali (noun m.; °-a; -ar): castle

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

glæsti ‘splendid’

2. glær (adj.): splendid

Close

glyggs ‘of the wind’

glygg (noun n.; °-s; -): storm

[8] glyggs: so 399a‑bˣ, ‘[...]yggs’ B

kennings

grams hauðrs glyggs.
‘of the prince of the land of the wind.’
   = God

the land of the wind. → SKY/HEAVEN
the prince of the SKY/HEAVEN → God

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

glyggs ‘of the wind’

glygg (noun n.; °-s; -): storm

[8] glyggs: so 399a‑bˣ, ‘[...]yggs’ B

kennings

grams hauðrs glyggs.
‘of the prince of the land of the wind.’
   = God

the land of the wind. → SKY/HEAVEN
the prince of the SKY/HEAVEN → God

notes

[5-8] kastali grams hauðrs glyggs ‘fortress of the prince of the land of the wind’: Cf. Mdr 1/7, where Mary is praised as God’s hæstr hǫfuðkastali ‘highest chief fortress’. It is possible that the Mdr poet consciously imitated the two appellations for Mary used in this st. Gamli’s use of kenning-types that compare the Virgin Mary to a building, especially a sacred or royal one, the receptacle for Christ’s incarnation, is among the earliest in skaldic verse and is based on Old Testament typology (templum Domini ‘the temple of the Lord’, solium Salomonis ‘the throne of Solomon’), whereby Solomon’s temple is a type or allegorical figure of the Virgin and she in turn is a type of the Church (Schottmann 1973, 47-51, 76).

Close

hryggvir ‘distresses’

hryggja (verb): distress

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.