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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Eyv Hák 9I

R. D. Fulk (ed.) 2012, ‘Eyvindr skáldaspillir Finnsson, Hákonarmál 9’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 184.

Eyvindr skáldaspillir FinnssonHákonarmál
8910

Sôtu ‘were sitting’

sitja (verb): sit

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dǫglingar ‘kings’

dǫglingr (noun m.; °; -ar): king, ruler

notes

[1] dǫglingar ‘kings’: In Skm (SnE 1998, I, 103), Snorri explains Daglingar or Dǫglingar as descendants of Dagr, a legendary king, but this is unlikely (LP: dǫglingr). Höfler (1952a, 33-7) argues that the word is to be connected with the personified Dagr ‘Day’ mentioned in Vafþr 25/2 (NK 49) and SnE 2005, 13. Sahlgren (1927-8, I, 89) proposes that the word describes the sons of Eiríkr rather than Hákon, but cf. Wolf (1969, 19).

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sverð ‘swords’

sverð (noun n.; °-s; -): sword

[2] sverð of (‘sverð um’): sverðum J1ˣ, J2ˣ

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of ‘’

3. of (prep.): around, from; too

[2] sverð of (‘sverð um’): sverðum J1ˣ, J2ˣ

notes

[2] of togin ‘drawn’: Although it might appear strange for the kings to sit with their swords drawn (and Sahlgren 1927-8, I, 78 proposes emendation), Wolff (1952, 105) argues that the point is that the kings are so fierce that even in death they are prepared for battle. Of is the expletive particle.

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togin ‘drawn’

tjúga (verb): draw

notes

[2] of togin ‘drawn’: Although it might appear strange for the kings to sit with their swords drawn (and Sahlgren 1927-8, I, 78 proposes emendation), Wolff (1952, 105) argues that the point is that the kings are so fierce that even in death they are prepared for battle. Of is the expletive particle.

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skornar ‘’

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skotnar ‘pierced’

skjóta (verb): shoot

[4] skotnar: skornar F

notes

[4] skotnar ‘pierced’: The reading skornar ‘cut’ of F, preferred in Skald, but not in Skj B, is also quite possible, but the agreement of and the J transcripts speaks for skotnar, especially as they represent different branches of the Hkr stemma.

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ok ‘and’

3. ok (conj.): and, but; also

[6] ok: so F, J1ˣ, J2ˣ, ok corrected from er Kˣ, er 761bˣ

notes

[6] ok ‘and’: Ok is likely to be original, as the reading of F and the J transcripts, from the two branches of the Hkr stemma. Kock (NN §1054) suggests translating as ‘who’ and points out that has er (which is adopted by Nygaard 1875, 321 and Lindquist 1929, 14), but this is presumably a copyist’s interpretation.

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As for st. 1.

[5-7]: Here the metre changes from málaháttr to ljóðaháttr. Emendations to put the entire stanza into ljóðaháttr were proposed by Ettmüller (1858, 26; 1861, 26). 

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