Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Eskál Vell 21I

Edith Marold (ed.) 2012, ‘Einarr skálaglamm Helgason, Vellekla 21’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 308.

Einarr skálaglamm HelgasonVellekla
202122

vas ‘happened’

2. vera (verb): be, is, was, were, are, am

[1] vas: varð FskAˣ

Close

meir ‘also’

meir (adv.): further, again

[1] meir: so J1ˣ, 325VIII 1, Bb, FskBˣ, FskAˣ, meirr Kˣ, F, J2ˣ, 61, 53, 54, 62, Flat

Close

at ‘that’

4. at (conj.): that

[1] at: er 61, Bb, 62, FskBˣ, FskAˣ

Close

Mœra ‘of the Mœrir’

1. Mœrir (noun m.; °; -ir): pl. Mœrir

[1] Mœra: meira 325VIII 1, mœta 61, FskAˣ, ‘mœ[..]’ 53

kennings

morðfíkinn folkverjandi Mœra
‘the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir ’
   = NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir → NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

notes

[1, 3] folkverjandi Mœra ‘the people-defender of the Mœrir [NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl]’: Although the kenning could refer to any Norwegian ruler, in this case it is a direct reference to Hákon jarl, who has become the defender of the people of Møre since Ragnfrøðr has occupied the regions bordering it to the south.

Close

morð ‘the battle’

1. morð (noun n.; °-s; -): killing, battle < morðfíkinn (adj./verb p.p.)

[2] morð‑: ‘mork‑’ F, morðs‑ 62

kennings

morðfíkinn folkverjandi Mœra
‘the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir ’
   = NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir → NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl
Close

ríkinn ‘’

Close

fíkinn ‘eager’

fíkinn (adj.): greedy < morðfíkinn (adj./verb p.p.)fíkinn (adj.): greedyfíkinn (adj.): greedy

[2] ‑fíkinn: ‑ríkinn Flat

kennings

morðfíkinn folkverjandi Mœra
‘the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir ’
   = NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir → NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl
Close

lek ‘’

Close

lét ‘had’

láta (verb): let, have sth done

[2] lét: ‘lec’ J2ˣ, lett Bb

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213).

Close

norðan ‘from the north’

norðan (adv.): from the north

Close

folk ‘people’

folk (noun n.): people < folkverjandi (noun m.)

kennings

morðfíkinn folkverjandi Mœra
‘the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir ’
   = NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir → NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

notes

[1, 3] folkverjandi Mœra ‘the people-defender of the Mœrir [NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl]’: Although the kenning could refer to any Norwegian ruler, in this case it is a direct reference to Hákon jarl, who has become the defender of the people of Møre since Ragnfrøðr has occupied the regions bordering it to the south.

Close

verjandi ‘defender’

verjandi (noun m.; °-a; -andr/-undr): defender < folkverjandi (noun m.)

kennings

morðfíkinn folkverjandi Mœra
‘the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir ’
   = NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

the battle-eager people-defender of the Mœrir → NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl

notes

[1, 3] folkverjandi Mœra ‘the people-defender of the Mœrir [NORWEGIAN RULER = Hákon jarl]’: Although the kenning could refer to any Norwegian ruler, in this case it is a direct reference to Hákon jarl, who has become the defender of the people of Møre since Ragnfrøðr has occupied the regions bordering it to the south.

Close

fyrva ‘his men’

fyrvi (noun m.): [his men]

[3] fyrva: fyrða 53, fjǫrva 62, Flat, FskBˣ, fjǫrvi FskAˣ

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213). — [3] fyrva ‘his men’: A less common derivative of fjǫr ‘life’ which, along with fjǫrvar and the more common forms fyrðar and firar, means ‘the living’ (AEW: firar, fyrvar).

Close

fyrva ‘his men’

fyrvi (noun m.): [his men]

[3] fyrva: fyrða 53, fjǫrva 62, Flat, FskBˣ, fjǫrvi FskAˣ

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213). — [3] fyrva ‘his men’: A less common derivative of fjǫr ‘life’ which, along with fjǫrvar and the more common forms fyrðar and firar, means ‘the living’ (AEW: firar, fyrvar).

Close

fǫr ‘a journey’

fǫr (noun f.): journey, fate; movement

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213).

Close

Sogns ‘Sogn’

Sogn (noun m.): Sogn-

[4] Sogns: sogn Bb, 62

Close

of ‘’

4. of (particle): (before verb)

[4] of: ok Bb

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213).

Close

gǫrva ‘undertake’

1. gera (verb): do, make

notes

[2, 3, 4] lét of gǫrva fǫr fyrva ‘had his men undertake a journey’: Lit. ‘had a journey of men undertaken’: Gǫrva here is f. acc. sg. of the adj. gǫrr ‘done’, agreeing with fǫr ‘journey’ and used as a p. p. ‘undertaken, made’ (see Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 139; LP: gǫrr 2; NN §3213).

Close

Ýtti ‘set out’

ýta (verb): launch

[5] Ýtti: so F, J1ˣ, J2ˣ, 61, 53, Bb, FskBˣ, ýti Kˣ, 325VIII 1, 54, veit ek at 62, Flat, ýtri FskAˣ

notes

[5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

Freyr ‘The Freyr’

Freyr (noun m.): (a god)

kennings

Freyr byrjar Heðins
‘The Freyr of the wind of Heðinn ’
   = WARRIOR

the wind of Heðinn → BATTLE
The Freyr of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

af ‘from’

af (prep.): from

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

af ‘from’

af (prep.): from

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

fjórum ‘four’

fjórir (num. cardinal): four

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

fjórum ‘four’

fjórir (num. cardinal): four

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

folkfolk’

folk (noun n.): people < folkland (noun n.)

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

folkfolk’

folk (noun n.): people < folkland (noun n.)

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

lǫndum ‘lǫnd

land (noun n.; °-s; *-): land < folkland (noun n.)

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

lǫndum ‘lǫnd

land (noun n.; °-s; *-): land < folkland (noun n.)

notes

[5-6] af fjórum folklǫndum ‘from four folklǫnd’: The uncommon word folkland (see LP, Fritzner: folkland) is often thought to be synonymous with fylki (for this term see Note to st. 13/1). Indrebø (1931, 36-9), however, rejects this notion, assuming that it designated a stamme-umraade ‘tribal area’. He refers to this stanza and points out that Hákon, anticipating a major battle, would not have summoned warriors from only four of the seven fylki that he ruled according to st. 13/1. From the prose context, which tells that the south of Norway had been occupied by Ragnfrøðr, he concludes that the four folklǫnd are Trøndelag, Møre, Romsdalen and Hålogaland which he thinks to have included Namdalen. Even if Indrebø’s interpretation of folklǫnd as ‘tribal area’ is contentious, it can be assumed that the term probably designated a larger area than fylki. — [5, 6] ýtti af fjórum folklǫndum ‘set out from four folklǫnd’: Ýtti has been rendered in one of two ways. (a) ‘He set out (on a ship)’ (this edn, and Konráð Gíslason 1872, 30 and 1895-7, I, 141; Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Skj B; cf. Fritzner: ýta 2; LP: ýta). (b) ‘He called for, conscripted’ in conjunction with allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’ (Vell 1865, 49-50; ÓT 1892, 374; ÍF 26; Hkr 1991; ÍF 29). However, ýta with a personal object in the dat. means ‘to assist in launching a boat’ (Fritzner: ýta 1), and allri yrþjóð is better construed with the intercalary clause.

Close

‘that’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

kennings

sá Ullr branda
‘that Ullr of swords ’
   = WARRIOR

that Ullr of swords → WARRIOR
Close

branda ‘of swords’

brandr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i; -ar): sword, prow; fire

[6] branda: brandi F, 53, brandr 54, brǫndum 62, Flat

kennings

sá Ullr branda
‘that Ullr of swords ’
   = WARRIOR

that Ullr of swords → WARRIOR
Close

Ullr ‘Ullr’

Ullr (noun m.): Ullr

[7] Ullr stóð: stóð uggr 53, 54, Bb

kennings

sá Ullr branda
‘that Ullr of swords ’
   = WARRIOR

that Ullr of swords → WARRIOR
Close

stóð ‘helped’

stoða (verb): to stay, support, back

[7] Ullr stóð: stóð uggr 53, 54, Bb

Close

af ‘’

af (prep.): from

[7] af: so J1ˣ, 61, 53, 54, Bb, 62, Flat, á Kˣ, F, J2ˣ, 325VIII 1, FskBˣ, FskAˣ

Close

allri ‘the whole’

allr (adj.): all

Close

yr ‘’

notes

[8] yrþjóð ‘people’: The word yrþjóð, which occurs again in st. 28/8 and in Sturl Hákkv 30/7II, and is presumably identical with urþjóð in Egill Arkv 17/3V (LP: yrþjóð), is usually claimed to be related to *verþjóð ‘man-folk’ despite uncertainty about the phonological development (see Falk 1889a, 118‑20; AEW: yrþjóð).

Close

þjóð ‘people’

þjóð (noun f.; °-ar, dat. -/-u; -ir): people < yrþjóð (noun f.): mankind

[8] ‑þjóð: ‑þjóðir 54, Bb

notes

[8] yrþjóð ‘people’: The word yrþjóð, which occurs again in st. 28/8 and in Sturl Hákkv 30/7II, and is presumably identical with urþjóð in Egill Arkv 17/3V (LP: yrþjóð), is usually claimed to be related to *verþjóð ‘man-folk’ despite uncertainty about the phonological development (see Falk 1889a, 118‑20; AEW: yrþjóð).

Close

Heðins ‘of Heðinn’

2. Heðinn (noun m.): [Heðinn, champions]

kennings

Freyr byrjar Heðins
‘The Freyr of the wind of Heðinn ’
   = WARRIOR

the wind of Heðinn → BATTLE
The Freyr of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

Heðins ‘of Heðinn’

2. Heðinn (noun m.): [Heðinn, champions]

kennings

Freyr byrjar Heðins
‘The Freyr of the wind of Heðinn ’
   = WARRIOR

the wind of Heðinn → BATTLE
The Freyr of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

byrjar ‘of the wind’

byrr (noun m.; °-jar/-s; -ir, acc. -i/-u(SigrVal 188¹³)): favourable wind

kennings

Freyr byrjar Heðins
‘The Freyr of the wind of Heðinn ’
   = WARRIOR

the wind of Heðinn → BATTLE
The Freyr of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

byrjar ‘of the wind’

byrr (noun m.; °-jar/-s; -ir, acc. -i/-u(SigrVal 188¹³)): favourable wind

kennings

Freyr byrjar Heðins
‘The Freyr of the wind of Heðinn ’
   = WARRIOR

the wind of Heðinn → BATTLE
The Freyr of the BATTLE → WARRIOR
Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

In Hkr and ÓT, Ragnfrøðr Eiríksson occupies the entire region south of Staðr (Stadlandet) including Sogn, Firðafylki (Sogn og Fjordane), Hǫrðaland (Hordaland) and Rogaland. The following spring Hákon jarl musters warriors from Hálogaland (Hålogaland), Naumudalr (Namdalen), from the region between Byrða (Børøya) and Staðr (probably Nordmøre) and from Þrœndalǫg (Trøndelag), as well as Raumsdalr (Romsdalen). In Hkr and ÓT, sts 21 and 22 are cited as evidence of this mustering and mobilisation for battle. Fsk cites st. 21 and st. 22/1-4 after a similar account, whereas Flat cites only st. 21.

[6-8]: The intercalary clause has been construed in two different ways (with variants which include or exclude allri yrþjóð ‘the whole people’). (a) The construal in this edn follows NN §2243, ÍF 26 and ÍF 29 in taking stóð as a verb. This is favoured by Kuhn’s thesis (1983, 149) that odd E-lines always contain the finite verb of an independent clause. On the translation of stóð as ‘helped’ see Fritzner: standa 22. (b) The word could be the noun stoð ‘support’: Ullr branda sá stoð af því allri yrþjóð ‘The Ullr of swords [WARRIOR] saw in this the support of the whole people’ (so Hkr 1893-1901, IV; Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 141; Skj B).

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.