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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Eindr Lv 1I

Diana Whaley (ed.) 2012, ‘Eindriði Einarsson, Lausavísa 1’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 806.

Eindriði EinarssonLausavísa1

mundar ‘of the hand’

1. mund (noun f.): hand

kennings

Freyr fúra mundar
‘the Freyr of flames of the hand ’
   = MAN = Eindriði

flames of the hand → GOLD
the Freyr of the GOLD → MAN = Eindriði
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mundar ‘of the hand’

1. mund (noun f.): hand

kennings

Freyr fúra mundar
‘the Freyr of flames of the hand ’
   = MAN = Eindriði

flames of the hand → GOLD
the Freyr of the GOLD → MAN = Eindriði
Close

fúra ‘of flames’

fúrr (noun m.): fire

kennings

Freyr fúra mundar
‘the Freyr of flames of the hand ’
   = MAN = Eindriði

flames of the hand → GOLD
the Freyr of the GOLD → MAN = Eindriði
Close

fúra ‘of flames’

fúrr (noun m.): fire

kennings

Freyr fúra mundar
‘the Freyr of flames of the hand ’
   = MAN = Eindriði

flames of the hand → GOLD
the Freyr of the GOLD → MAN = Eindriði
Close

fátt ‘few’

3. fár (adj.; °compar. fǽrri/fárri(Mág² 11ˆ), superl. fǽstr): few

notes

[3] fátt it réttra ‘few things more true’: The phrase is grammatically sg. Kock (NN §2013; Skald) disputes the need for emendation, reading fátt it rétta. This would mean ‘few things [that are] true’, presumably referring to the speech of the accuser rather than the poet, but this seems unlikely given that the accuser is not introduced until the second helmingr.

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Freyr ‘the Freyr’

Freyr (noun m.): (a god)

kennings

Freyr fúra mundar
‘the Freyr of flames of the hand ’
   = MAN = Eindriði

flames of the hand → GOLD
the Freyr of the GOLD → MAN = Eindriði
Close

it ‘things’

2. inn (art.): the

notes

[3] fátt it réttra ‘few things more true’: The phrase is grammatically sg. Kock (NN §2013; Skald) disputes the need for emendation, reading fátt it rétta. This would mean ‘few things [that are] true’, presumably referring to the speech of the accuser rather than the poet, but this seems unlikely given that the accuser is not introduced until the second helmingr.

Close

réttra ‘more true’

3. réttr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): right, straight, direct

[3] réttra: rétta Flat

notes

[3] fátt it réttra ‘few things more true’: The phrase is grammatically sg. Kock (NN §2013; Skald) disputes the need for emendation, reading fátt it rétta. This would mean ‘few things [that are] true’, presumably referring to the speech of the accuser rather than the poet, but this seems unlikely given that the accuser is not introduced until the second helmingr.

Close

allt ‘all’

allr (adj.): all

Close

varrar ‘the lips’

2. vǫrr (noun f.): lip

[4] varrar: ‘uarar’ Flat

Close

En ‘But may’

4. en (conj.): than

Close

kenna ‘to accuse’

kenna (verb): know, teach

Close

atgeirs ‘of the halberd’

atgeirr (noun m.; °-s, dat. -i/-; -ar): [halberd]

kennings

Baldr atgeirs,
‘the Baldr of the halberd ’
   = WARRIOR

the Baldr of the halberd → WARRIOR
Close

af ‘about’

af (prep.): from

Close

Baldr ‘the Baldr’

Baldr (noun m.): [Baldr, Baldur]

kennings

Baldr atgeirs,
‘the Baldr of the halberd ’
   = WARRIOR

the Baldr of the halberd → WARRIOR
Close

sjaldan ‘seldom’

sjaldan (adv.): seldom

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segi ‘speak’

segja (verb): say, tell

notes

[8] segi allvesall ‘may ... speak completely wretched’: I.e. ‘a curse on him and his words’. An alternative view of the syntax favoured by Kock (NN §2013; Skald) takes this as the intercalary. However, the remaining words of the helmingr then belong together, and the clause beginning sás ‘(the warrior) who’ becomes subject to the verb phrase mun þegja ‘will be silent’, making sjá ‘this man’ redundant.

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allvesall ‘completely wretched’

allvesall (adj.): very wretched

notes

[8] segi allvesall ‘may ... speak completely wretched’: I.e. ‘a curse on him and his words’. An alternative view of the syntax favoured by Kock (NN §2013; Skald) takes this as the intercalary. However, the remaining words of the helmingr then belong together, and the clause beginning sás ‘(the warrior) who’ becomes subject to the verb phrase mun þegja ‘will be silent’, making sjá ‘this man’ redundant.

Close

þegja ‘be silent’

þegja (verb): be silent

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Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

Eindriði spends three nights sheltering from a storm in a fishing hut with Sigríðr, daughter of the magnate Erlingr Skjálgsson. Returning her home to her father, Eindriði attempts to convince him that he has not dishonoured the woman or her kinsmen. After the stanza, it is told how he proves his honour through an ordeal of hot iron.

For another stanza referring to the irate father of a woman, see Stefnir Lv 2.

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