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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Arn Magndr 14II

Diana Whaley (ed.) 2009, ‘Arnórr jarlaskáld Þórðarson, Magnússdrápa 14’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 223-4.

Arnórr jarlaskáld ÞórðarsonMagnússdrápa
131415

tók ‘seized’

2. taka (verb): take

[1] tók: tókt FskBˣ

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Bjarnar ‘of Bjǫrn’s’

bjǫrn (noun m.; °bjarnar, dat. birni; birnir, acc. bjǫrnu): bear, Bjǫrn

kennings

bróður Bjarnar
‘of Bjǫrn’s brother, ’
   = Sveinn

Bjǫrn’s brother, → Sveinn

notes

[1] bróður Bjarnar ‘of Bjǫrn’s brother’: This is Sveinn Úlfsson. Bjǫrn is mentioned together with Sveinn in Knýtl (ÍF 35, 97, 141) and Mork (1928-32, 223). An English earl, he was treacherously killed by Swegn Godwineson (ASC ‘C’ s. a. 1049, ‘D’ s. a. 1050, ‘E’ s. a. 1046).

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bróður ‘brother’

bróðir (noun m.; °bróður/brǿðr/bróðurs, dat. bróður/brǿðr/breðr, acc. bróður/brǿðr; brǿðr/bróðr/breðr (brǿðrirnir Jvs291 75¹⁴), gen. brǿ---): brother

[1] bróður: bróðir FskBˣ, Flat

kennings

bróður Bjarnar
‘of Bjǫrn’s brother, ’
   = Sveinn

Bjǫrn’s brother, → Sveinn

notes

[1] bróður Bjarnar ‘of Bjǫrn’s brother’: This is Sveinn Úlfsson. Bjǫrn is mentioned together with Sveinn in Knýtl (ÍF 35, 97, 141) and Mork (1928-32, 223). An English earl, he was treacherously killed by Swegn Godwineson (ASC ‘C’ s. a. 1049, ‘D’ s. a. 1050, ‘E’ s. a. 1046).

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ballr ‘baleful’

ballr (adj.): very bold, baleful

[2] ballr: baldr 39, FskBˣ, hallr Flat

notes

[2] ballr Skônungum ‘baleful to the Skánungar’: (a) The idiom ballr e-m ‘baleful, harsh, fearsome to sby’ may be paralleled in Bdr 5/7-8 réðo ... hví væri Baldri ballir draumar ‘discussed … why his dreams were baleful to Baldr’ (NK 277), if dat. sg. Baldri ‘to Baldr’ is construed, as here, with ballir ‘baleful’, hence ‘discussed … why Baldr’s dreams were baleful’ (réðo … hví draumar væri ballir Baldri). There does not appear to be a more secure example of ballr e-m (e.g. ONP has none), but such a construction might have been encouraged by the phonetically and semantically similar bella e-m ‘harm sby’ (strong verb), or by adj. phrases such as reiðr e-m ‘angry with sby’ or hættr e-m as in hættr Serkjum ‘dangerous to Saracens’ (ÞjóðA Sex 2). The postulated phrase ballr Sknungum is also compatible with the tradition that the people of Skåne (Skáney, now southern Sweden but then Dan. territory) earned Magnús’s hostility by supporting his enemy Sveinn. This interpretation is adopted by Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 58 n.). (b) Finnur Jónsson in Skj B and Kock in Skald, on the other hand, emend to gen. pl. Sknunga, which they take with gramr, hence ‘monarch of Skánungar’.

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Skônungum ‘to the Skánungar’

skánungr (noun m.; °; -ar): one of the Skánungar

[2] Skônungum: ‘skæningum’ FskBˣ, kann ungum Flat

notes

[2] ballr Skônungum ‘baleful to the Skánungar’: (a) The idiom ballr e-m ‘baleful, harsh, fearsome to sby’ may be paralleled in Bdr 5/7-8 réðo ... hví væri Baldri ballir draumar ‘discussed … why his dreams were baleful to Baldr’ (NK 277), if dat. sg. Baldri ‘to Baldr’ is construed, as here, with ballir ‘baleful’, hence ‘discussed … why Baldr’s dreams were baleful’ (réðo … hví draumar væri ballir Baldri). There does not appear to be a more secure example of ballr e-m (e.g. ONP has none), but such a construction might have been encouraged by the phonetically and semantically similar bella e-m ‘harm sby’ (strong verb), or by adj. phrases such as reiðr e-m ‘angry with sby’ or hættr e-m as in hættr Serkjum ‘dangerous to Saracens’ (ÞjóðA Sex 2). The postulated phrase ballr Sknungum is also compatible with the tradition that the people of Skåne (Skáney, now southern Sweden but then Dan. territory) earned Magnús’s hostility by supporting his enemy Sveinn. This interpretation is adopted by Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson (ÍF 28, 58 n.). (b) Finnur Jónsson in Skj B and Kock in Skald, on the other hand, emend to gen. pl. Sknunga, which they take with gramr, hence ‘monarch of Skánungar’.

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allar ‘all’

allr (adj.): all

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røri ‘rowed’

2. róa (verb): row

[3] røri: reyri J2ˣ, H

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þeirar ‘at the right’

1. sá (pron.; °gen. þess, dat. þeim, acc. þann; f. sú, gen. þeirrar, acc. þá; n. þat, dat. því; pl. m. þeir, f. þǽ---): that (one), those

[3] þeirar: þeirra Flat

notes

[3] þeirar tíðar ‘at the right moment’: So Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson, who renders tíð as heillastund (?) ‘fortunate time (?)’ (ÍF 28, 58 n.). Although tíð f. normally has a neutral sense which can be qualified by góð ‘good’ or ill ‘bad, evil’, the possibility that it can have a favourable sense is suggested by its antonym ótíð ‘bad season, bad weather, inappropriate time’ and by the adj. tíðr ‘accustomed, popular, beloved’.

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tíðar ‘moment’

1. tíð (noun f.; °-ar; -ir): time

notes

[3] þeirar tíðar ‘at the right moment’: So Bjarni Aðalbjarnarson, who renders tíð as heillastund (?) ‘fortunate time (?)’ (ÍF 28, 58 n.). Although tíð f. normally has a neutral sense which can be qualified by góð ‘good’ or ill ‘bad, evil’, the possibility that it can have a favourable sense is suggested by its antonym ótíð ‘bad season, bad weather, inappropriate time’ and by the adj. tíðr ‘accustomed, popular, beloved’.

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gramr ‘The monarch’

1. gramr (noun m.): ruler

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með ‘every’

með (prep.): with

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In Hkr, Fsk and H-Hr, the st. appears in the account of the battle at Helgenæs (Helganes). Flat by contrast attaches the st. to the battle south of Århus (Áróss), citing it immediately after st. 15.

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