Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Continue

skaldic

Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

Menu Search

Hfr Óldr 1I

Diana Whaley (ed.) 2012, ‘Hallfreðr vandræðaskáld Óttarsson, Óláfsdrápa 1’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 392.

Hallfreðr vandræðaskáld ÓttarssonÓláfsdrápa
12y

frák ‘I have learned’

1. fregna (verb): hear of

Close

hôva ‘high’

3. hár (adj.; °-van; compar. hǽrri, superl. hǽstr): high

[1] hôva: so 310, hôvan FskBˣ, 51ˣ, FskAˣ

Close

hǫrg ‘shrine’

hǫrgr (noun m.; °; -ar): cairn, shrine < hǫrgbrjótr (noun m.)

notes

[2] hǫrgbrjótr ‘the shrine-destroyer’: An unusual expression depicting Óláfr specifically as a Christian ruler, a purger of heathendom; cf. végrimmr ‘temple-fierce, fierce against heathen temples’ in l. 8. Hǫrgbrjótr could be regarded, as here, as a kenning-like cpd, or as an actual kenning (so Meissner 363), albeit an unusual one.

Close

brjótr ‘destroyer’

brjótr (noun m.): breaker < hǫrgbrjótr (noun m.)

notes

[2] hǫrgbrjótr ‘the shrine-destroyer’: An unusual expression depicting Óláfr specifically as a Christian ruler, a purger of heathendom; cf. végrimmr ‘temple-fierce, fierce against heathen temples’ in l. 8. Hǫrgbrjótr could be regarded, as here, as a kenning-like cpd, or as an actual kenning (so Meissner 363), albeit an unusual one.

Close

opt ‘often’

opt (adv.): often

Close

kom ‘came’

koma (verb; kem, kom/kvam, kominn): come

notes

[3, 4] kom at heipta blóði ‘came to the blood of strife’: Although heipta occurs in no ms., it could have been the starting point for the existing readings: ‘hamna’ (normalised hafna) in FskBˣ, for which a possible meaning is suggested below; the uninterpretable ‘hæfta’ in FskAˣ; and dat. pl. heiptum ‘strife’ in 310, which makes good sense but leaves blóði ‘blood’ (l. 4) stranded and sits uncomfortably with its preceding þars. (a) The construal adopted here is favoured by Finnur Jónsson in Fsk 1902-3 and in LP: heipt 1; also by Bjarni Einarsson in ÍF 29. (b) In Skj B Finnur takes at with blóði, hence opt kom hrafn at blóði ‘the raven often got blood’, while translating heiptum as med fjendtligt sind ‘with hostile mind’ and taking it with hlóð ‘heaped’ (l. 4) and the clause built around it. However, if the dat. reading heiptum were correct the immediately preceding prep. at would govern it rather than the more distant blóði (cf. Kuhn 1983, 120-2 on proclitic prepositions). (c) Kock (Skald and NN §473) reads hafna ... blóði ‘crews’ blood’.

Close

at ‘to’

3. at (prep.): at, to

[3] at: þars 310

notes

[3, 4] kom at heipta blóði ‘came to the blood of strife’: Although heipta occurs in no ms., it could have been the starting point for the existing readings: ‘hamna’ (normalised hafna) in FskBˣ, for which a possible meaning is suggested below; the uninterpretable ‘hæfta’ in FskAˣ; and dat. pl. heiptum ‘strife’ in 310, which makes good sense but leaves blóði ‘blood’ (l. 4) stranded and sits uncomfortably with its preceding þars. (a) The construal adopted here is favoured by Finnur Jónsson in Fsk 1902-3 and in LP: heipt 1; also by Bjarni Einarsson in ÍF 29. (b) In Skj B Finnur takes at with blóði, hence opt kom hrafn at blóði ‘the raven often got blood’, while translating heiptum as med fjendtligt sind ‘with hostile mind’ and taking it with hlóð ‘heaped’ (l. 4) and the clause built around it. However, if the dat. reading heiptum were correct the immediately preceding prep. at would govern it rather than the more distant blóði (cf. Kuhn 1983, 120-2 on proclitic prepositions). (c) Kock (Skald and NN §473) reads hafna ... blóði ‘crews’ blood’.

Close

hæfta ‘’

Close

heipta ‘of strife’

heift (noun f.; °-ar; -ir): hatred, enmity

[3] heipta: ‘hamna’ FskBˣ, 51ˣ, ‘hæfta’ FskAˣ, heiptum 310

notes

[3, 4] kom at heipta blóði ‘came to the blood of strife’: Although heipta occurs in no ms., it could have been the starting point for the existing readings: ‘hamna’ (normalised hafna) in FskBˣ, for which a possible meaning is suggested below; the uninterpretable ‘hæfta’ in FskAˣ; and dat. pl. heiptum ‘strife’ in 310, which makes good sense but leaves blóði ‘blood’ (l. 4) stranded and sits uncomfortably with its preceding þars. (a) The construal adopted here is favoured by Finnur Jónsson in Fsk 1902-3 and in LP: heipt 1; also by Bjarni Einarsson in ÍF 29. (b) In Skj B Finnur takes at with blóði, hence opt kom hrafn at blóði ‘the raven often got blood’, while translating heiptum as med fjendtligt sind ‘with hostile mind’ and taking it with hlóð ‘heaped’ (l. 4) and the clause built around it. However, if the dat. reading heiptum were correct the immediately preceding prep. at would govern it rather than the more distant blóði (cf. Kuhn 1983, 120-2 on proclitic prepositions). (c) Kock (Skald and NN §473) reads hafna ... blóði ‘crews’ blood’.

Close

blóði ‘the blood’

blóð (noun n.; °-s): blood

notes

[3, 4] kom at heipta blóði ‘came to the blood of strife’: Although heipta occurs in no ms., it could have been the starting point for the existing readings: ‘hamna’ (normalised hafna) in FskBˣ, for which a possible meaning is suggested below; the uninterpretable ‘hæfta’ in FskAˣ; and dat. pl. heiptum ‘strife’ in 310, which makes good sense but leaves blóði ‘blood’ (l. 4) stranded and sits uncomfortably with its preceding þars. (a) The construal adopted here is favoured by Finnur Jónsson in Fsk 1902-3 and in LP: heipt 1; also by Bjarni Einarsson in ÍF 29. (b) In Skj B Finnur takes at with blóði, hence opt kom hrafn at blóði ‘the raven often got blood’, while translating heiptum as med fjendtligt sind ‘with hostile mind’ and taking it with hlóð ‘heaped’ (l. 4) and the clause built around it. However, if the dat. reading heiptum were correct the immediately preceding prep. at would govern it rather than the more distant blóði (cf. Kuhn 1983, 120-2 on proclitic prepositions). (c) Kock (Skald and NN §473) reads hafna ... blóði ‘crews’ blood’.

Close

Endr ‘formerly’

endr (adv.): formerly, once, again

[5] Endr: enn F

Close

lét ‘caused’

láta (verb): let, have sth done

[5] lét: létsk F

Close

Jamta ‘of the Jamtr’

jamtr (noun m.; °; -): jamtr

Close

kindir ‘the kin’

kind (noun f.; °-ar; -r): offspring, race

[5] kindir: kindar FskBˣ, 51ˣ, kindr FskAˣ, kindum 53, 54, Bb

Close

valdr ‘ruler’

valdr (noun m.): ruler < allvaldr (noun m.): mighty ruler

[6] ‑valdr í styr: ‑valdastr Bb, ‑vandliga Flat;    ‑valdr: ‘[…]’ FskBˣ, ‑valdr or valda 62

Close

í ‘in’

í (prep.): in, into

[6] ‑valdr í styr: ‑valdastr Bb, ‑vandliga Flat;    í: om. FskBˣ

Close

styr ‘the mêlée’

styrr (noun m.; °dat. -): battle

[6] ‑valdr í styr: ‑valdastr Bb, ‑vandliga Flat

Close

falla ‘to fall’

falla (verb): fall

Close

vanðisk ‘became accustomed’

væna (verb): hope

[7] vanðisk: ‘[…]’ FskBˣ

Close

ok ‘and’

3. ok (conj.): and, but; also

[7] ok: æ J1ˣ, at Flat

Close

Vinða ‘Wends’

Vinðr (noun m.; °; vinðr/-ir): the Wends

[7] Vinða: víða 51ˣ

Close

vígg ‘’

Close

‘heathen temples’

1. vé (noun n.): house, sanctuary < végrimmr (adj.)

[8] grimmr: so F, 61, 53, 54, Bb, 62, ‘[…]’ FskBˣ, ‘vegrunr’ 51ˣ, veggrimmr Kˣ, FskAˣ, J1ˣ, Flat, víggrimmr 310

notes

[8] végrimmr ‘fierce against heathen temples’: Although and other mss read veg-, perhaps ‘path’ or ‘honour’, this makes little sense compounded with grimmr ‘fierce’, and vé- ‘heathen temple’ is to be preferred. This reading is found in F and supported by ‘vegrimr’ in papp18ˣ and J2ˣ, both of which are transcripts of the vellum K at this point; it may also find some support in the 51ˣ reading ‘vegrunr’. Significant in its rarity, végrimmr matches hǫrgbrjótr ‘shrine-destroyer’ in l. 2 (which falls in a different stanza in the Hkr-ÓT arrangement of the poem), fleetingly portraying Óláfr in his role as militant missionary. Syntactically, the adj. could conceivably be taken to qualify hann ‘he’ in l. 7, but the present arrangement, which leaves the intercalated clause in ll. 7, 8 more terse, seems stylistically preferable and is favoured by earlier eds.

Close

grimmr ‘fierce against’

grimmr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): fierce < végrimmr (adj.)grimmr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): fierce < veggrimmr (adj.)grimmr (adj.; °compar. -ari, superl. -astr): fierce < víggrimmr (adj.)

[8] grimmr: so F, 61, 53, 54, Bb, 62, ‘[…]’ FskBˣ, ‘vegrunr’ 51ˣ, veggrimmr Kˣ, FskAˣ, J1ˣ, Flat, víggrimmr 310

notes

[8] végrimmr ‘fierce against heathen temples’: Although and other mss read veg-, perhaps ‘path’ or ‘honour’, this makes little sense compounded with grimmr ‘fierce’, and vé- ‘heathen temple’ is to be preferred. This reading is found in F and supported by ‘vegrimr’ in papp18ˣ and J2ˣ, both of which are transcripts of the vellum K at this point; it may also find some support in the 51ˣ reading ‘vegrunr’. Significant in its rarity, végrimmr matches hǫrgbrjótr ‘shrine-destroyer’ in l. 2 (which falls in a different stanza in the Hkr-ÓT arrangement of the poem), fleetingly portraying Óláfr in his role as militant missionary. Syntactically, the adj. could conceivably be taken to qualify hann ‘he’ in l. 7, but the present arrangement, which leaves the intercalated clause in ll. 7, 8 more terse, seems stylistically preferable and is favoured by earlier eds.

Close

á ‘to’

3. á (prep.): on, at

[8] á þat: ‘[…]’ FskBˣ

Close

snimma ‘early’

snemma (adv.): early

Close

Interactive view: tap on words in the text for notes and glosses

See Introduction.

FskBˣ is used as main ms. for ll. 1-4, which are lacking in Hkr and ÓT, while is used as main ms. for ll. 5-8 since FskBˣ has several small lacunae there, resulting from a large tear at the foot of fol. 32v. The arrangement of helmingar in Fsk and 310 is followed here, as throughout this edn, since that arrangement seems likely to be closer to the original; see Introduction. In Hkr and ÓT, ll. 5-8 form a stanza with st. 2/1-4.

Close

Log in

This service is only available to members of the relevant projects, and to purchasers of the skaldic volumes published by Brepols.
This service uses cookies. By logging in you agree to the use of cookies on your browser.

Close

Stanza/chapter/text segment

Use the buttons at the top of the page to navigate between stanzas in a poem.

Information tab

Interactive tab

The text and translation are given here, with buttons to toggle whether the text is shown in the verse order or prose word order. Clicking on indiviudal words gives dictionary links, variant readings, kennings and notes, where relevant.

Full text tab

This is the text of the edition in a similar format to how the edition appears in the printed volumes.

Chapter/text segment

This view is also used for chapters and other text segments. Not all the headings shown are relevant to such sections.