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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Fragment — Hskv FragIII

Halldórr skvaldri

Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Halldórr skvaldri, Fragment’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 210.

 

This helmingr (Hskv Frag) is usually assigned to Halldórr skvaldri’s Útfarardrápa (Hskv ÚtdrII; so SnE 1848-87, III, 368-9, Skj A and Skald), an encomium composed in honour of the Norwegian king Sigurðr jórsalafari ‘Jerusalem-farer’ Magnússon (r. 1103-30). Although it was certainly part of a panegyric, the content is too general to warrant such an attribution (see Fidjestøl 1982, 157), and Halldórr composed about numerous other rulers and magnates (see his Biography in SkP II). The present tense used in the helmingr indicates that the recipient of the poem was still alive at the time of composition, and Halldórr also uses the present tense in his encomia to Sigurðr jórsalafari (c. 1120) and Sigurðr’s half-brother, Haraldr gillikristr ‘Servant of Christ’ (c. 1137). The stanza is transmitted in mss , U, A B, C of Skm (SnE). Ms. B is now almost illegible and 744ˣ has been used in its place. The name of the poet is given as Halldórr skvaldri (A, 744ˣ, C), Halldórr (U) or Halldórr Skúlason (). The leaf containing the stanza is damaged in R (the top of fol. 39r has been removed), and is the main ms.

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. Skj A = Finnur Jónsson, ed. 1912-15a. Den norsk-islandske skjaldedigtning. A: Tekst efter håndskrifterne. 2 vols. Copenhagen: Villadsen & Christensen. Rpt. 1967. Copenhagen: Rosenkilde & Bagger.
  3. SnE 1848-87 = Snorri Sturluson. 1848-87. Edda Snorra Sturlusonar: Edda Snorronis Sturlaei. Ed. Jón Sigurðsson et al. 3 vols. Copenhagen: Legatum Arnamagnaeanum. Rpt. Osnabrück: Zeller, 1966.
  4. Skald = Kock, Ernst Albin, ed. 1946-50. Den norsk-isländska skaldediktningen. 2 vols. Lund: Gleerup.
  5. Fidjestøl, Bjarne. 1982. Det norrøne fyrstediktet. Universitet i Bergen Nordisk institutts skriftserie 11. Øvre Ervik: Alvheim & Eide.
  6. SkP II = Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Ed. Kari Ellen Gade. 2009.
  7. Internal references
  8. Edith Marold 2017, ‘Snorra Edda (Prologue, Gylfaginning, Skáldskaparmál)’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  9. Not published: do not cite (SkmIII)
  10. Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘(Biography of) Halldórr skvaldri’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 210.
  11. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Halldórr skvaldri, Útfarardrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 483-92.
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Information about a text: poem, sequence of stanzas, or prose work

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