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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísa — Þskúm LvI

Þorleifr skúma Þorkelsson

Diana Whaley 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Þorleifr skúma Þorkelsson, Lausavísa’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 359.

 

This fornyrðislag stanza (Þskúm Lv) is attributed to one of the Icelanders fighting for the Norwegians against the Jómsvíkingar at the battle of Hjǫrungavágr (Liavågen), c. 985, and this man is identified as Þorleifr skúma Þorkelsson in Jvs and in FoGT but as Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson in Fsk (ÍF 29, 131, and see Context below), which on the other hand attributes Eskál Lv 3 to ‘Skúmr’ as he died of his wounds after the battle; see Context for that stanza. There is little evidence on which to build a case for either of the rival attributions, but since there is a stronger tradition that Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson was a skald (see his Biography) than that Þorleifr was, the attribution of this stanza to Vígfúss may have been erroneous. A similar (Latin) stanza is found in Saxo Grammaticus (Saxo 2005, I, 7, 2, 10, p. 450), uttered by Haldanus as he brandishes a hastily-improvised wooden club. The present stanza is preserved in Jvs (mss 291, Flat, 510, 7); Fsk (of which the best transcripts, FskBˣ, FskAˣ, are used here); and FoGT (ms. W). A further text in LaufE (1979, 380) was copied from W and is therefore not used in this edition. Ms. 291 is used as main ms. since it has a fuller text (see Note to ll. 3-4).

References

  1. Bibliography
  2. ÍF 29 = Ágrip af Nóregskonunga sǫgum; Fagrskinna—Nóregs konungatal. Ed. Bjarni Einarsson. 1985.
  3. Saxo 2005 = Friis-Jensen, Karsten, ed. 2005. Saxo Grammaticus: Gesta Danorum / Danmarkshistorien. Trans. Peter Zeeberg. 2 vols. Copenhagen: Det danske sprog- og litteraturselskab & Gads forlag.
  4. Internal references
  5. Margaret Clunies Ross 2017, ‘The Fourth Grammatical Treatise’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
  6. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘Fagrskinna (Fsk)’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. clix-clxi.
  7. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘(Biography of) Þorleifr skúma Þorkelsson’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 358.
  8. Diana Whaley 2012, ‘(Biography of) Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 361.
  9. Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.) 2012, ‘Einarr skálaglamm Helgason, Lausavísur 3’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 333.
  10. Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘Laufás Edda (LaufE)’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols [check printed volume for citation].
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