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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Lausavísur — Þfisk LvII

Þorgils fiskimaðr

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Þorgils fiskimaðr, Lausavísur’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 333-6.

 

Ófúsa drók ýsu;
áttak fang við lǫngu;
vannk of hǫfði hennar
hlǫmm; vas þat fyr skǫmmu.
Þó mank hitt, es hrotta
hafðak gulli vafðan;
dúðum dǫrr í blóði,
drengr; vas þat fyr lengra.
 
‘I pulled up the reluctant haddock; I wrestled with the ling; I exulted above its head; that was recently. Yet I recall when I owned the gold-wrapped sword; we shook spears in blood, warrior; that was longer ago.
Heyr á uppreist orða,
ótvínn konungr, mína!
Gaf mér gull it rauða
gramr; vas þat fyr skǫmmu.
Saddir ǫrn, ok eyddir
ǫrum blámanna fjǫrvi;
gall styrfengins stillis
strengr; vas þat fyr lengra.
 
‘Unwavering king, hear the improvement of my poetry! The ruler gave me red gold; that was recently. You satiated the eagle, and destroyed the lives of dark men with arrows; the bowstring of the battle-fit lord resounded; that was longer ago.
Víg lézt, Vinða mýgir,
virðum kunn of unnin
— Þrœndr drifu ríkt und randir —
rǫmm; en þat vas skǫmmu.
Enn fyr Serkland sunnan
snarr þengill hjó drengi;
kunni gramr at gunni
gǫng; vas þat fyr lǫngu.
 
‘Oppressor of the Wends [= Haraldr], you waged furious wars, known to men; the Þrœndir pressed on mightily beneath shield-rims; and that was recently. And, south of the land of the Saracens, the swift ruler cut down warriors; the lord knew how to advance in battle; that was long ago.
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