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Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages

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Valþjófsflokkr — ÞSkall ValflII

Þorkell Skallason

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Þorkell Skallason, Valþjófsflokkr’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 382-4.

 

Hundrað lét í heitum
hirðmenn jǫfurs brenna
sóknar Yggr, en seggjum
sviðukveld vas þat, eldi.
Frétts, at fyrðar knôttu
flagðviggs und kló liggja;
ímleitum fekksk áta
óls blakk við hræ Frakka.
 
‘The Yggr <= Óðinn> of battle [WARRIOR = Waltheof] caused a hundred retainers of the ruler [William] to burn in hot fire, and that was a scorching evening for the men. It is known that people lay beneath the claw of the troll-woman’s steed [WOLF]; food was given to the dark-coloured horse of the troll-woman [WOLF] from the carrion of the Normans.
Víst hefr Valþjóf hraustan
Viljalmr, sás rauð malma,
hinn, es haf skar sunnan
hélt, í tryggð of véltan.
Satts, at síð mun létta,
snarr en minn vas harri,
— deyrat mildingr mærri —
manndráp á Englandi.
 
‘William, who reddened weapons, the one who cut the rime-flecked sea from the south, has indeed betrayed the bold Waltheof under safe conduct. It is true that killings will be slow to cease in England, but my lord was brave; a more splendid munificent prince will not die.
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