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Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson (Vígf)

10th century; volume 1; ed. Diana Whaley;

2. Lausavísa (Lv) - 1

Vígfúss (Vígf) was born c. 955, according to the chronology of Víga-Glúms saga, the saga of his father Víga-Glúmr ‘Slayings-Glúmr’ Eyjólfsson, in which Vígfúss also features prominently. Physically and temperamentally robust, he travelled abroad on merchant voyages and then became a trusted retainer of the jarls of Hlaðir (Lade), Hákon and Eiríkr. Back in Iceland, he spent six years in outlawry after avenging his foster-father on Bárðr, brother of Brúsi skáld, then appears to have returned to the service of the jarls, fighting bravely in the battles of Hjǫrungavágr (Liavågen, c. 985) and Svǫlðr (c. 1000), before settling back in Iceland (see further LH I, 541-2 for his biography). He is named in the U text of Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 256) as a poet of Hákon jarl, and the first stanza below (Vígf Hák) may belong to a composition about him. That and the lausavísa that follows are the only extant poetry credited to Vígfúss (though see Introduction to Þskúm Lv). Olsen (1956; 1962, 51-2), noting resemblances to Eskál Vell 1 both in Vígf Lv and in the dróttkvætt lines on the Karlevi stone (Run Öl1/7VI) and envisaging a similar historical context, suggested Vígfúss as the Karlevi poet, but this is not generally accepted.

Lausavísa — Vígf LvI

Diana Whaley 2012, ‘(Introduction to) Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson, Lausavísa’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 364.

stanzas:  1 

Skj: Vígfúss Víga-Glúmsson: [2]. Lausavísa, 986 (AI, 121, BI, 115); stanzas (if different): [v]

in texts: Flat, Fsk, Jvs

SkP info: I, 364

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance references search files

 

The stanza (Vígf Lv) contrasts the warrior preparing his spear for battle with the stay-at-home lying with a girl, and according to the sources it is part of the psychological and physical preparation for the battle of Hjǫrungavágr (Liavågen, c. 985). There is little to choose between the Fsk and Jvs texts of this stanza, but the generally reliable FskBˣ has been adopted as main ms. here. Also used are FskAˣ and the Jvs mss 7, Flat and 510.

Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated