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Runic Dictionary

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Anonymous Poems (Anon)

III. Málsháttakvæði (Mhkv) - 30

5: Málsháttakvæði (‘Proverb poem’) — Anon MhkvIII

Roberta Frank 2017, ‘ Anonymous, Málsháttakvæði’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1213. <https://skaldic.org/m.php?p=text&i=1029> (accessed 23 September 2021)

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30 

Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII]: A. [1]. Málsháttakvæði, Et orknøsk(?) digt, omkr. 1200. (AII, 130-6, BII, 138-45)

SkP info: III, 1228

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

13 — Anon Mhkv 13III

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Roberta Frank (ed.) 2017, ‘Anonymous Poems, Málsháttakvæði 13’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1228.

Afli of deilir sízt við sjá;
Sǫrli sprakk af gildri þrá;
stundum þýtr í logni lá;
litlu verr, at ráðak fá.
Mǫrgum þykkir fullgótt fé;
frænuskammr er inn deigi lé;
kvæðit skal með kynjum alt;
konungs morginn er langr á valt.

Afli of deilir sízt við sjá; Sǫrli sprakk af gildri þrá; stundum þýtr lá í logni; litlu verr, at ráðak fá. Mǫrgum þykkir fé fullgótt; frænuskammr er inn deigi lé; alt kvæðit skal með kynjum; morginn konungs er á valt langr.

One contends least in strength with the sea; Sǫrli burst from great longing; at times the surf resounds in a calm; it hardly matters that I prevail but little. To many a man wealth seems good enough; of short sharpness is the soft scythe; the whole poem shall be really strange; a king’s morning is always long.

Mss: R(54v)

Readings: [8] er: ‘e[...]’ R, er RFJ;    langr: ‘l[...]ngr’ R, langr RFJ

Editions: Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII], A. [1]. Málsháttakvæði 13: AII, 133, BII, 141, Skald II, 75; Möbius 1874, 7, Wisén 1886-9, I, 74.

Notes: [1] of: Correct use of the expletive particle (see Note to st. 10/5). — [2] Sǫrli: Unidentified hero (not the brother of Hamðir, cf. Bragi Rdr 5/5). Christiansen (1931, 413-16) suggests Seurlus, son of the king of Bergen in a Gaelic ballad, whose heart and ribs broke when he swam out to sea after his mermaid-lover. — [3]: Cf. the portent in Orkneyinga saga (Orkn ch. 47, ÍF 34, 106): boði fell í logni ‘a breaker fell from a calm sea’. — [7] með kynjum ‘really strange’: Lit. ‘with portents, wonders’, i.e. ‘remarkable, odd, peculiar’. This phrase must refer to the non-traditional content of the poem. — [8]: Cf. Sigv Lv 11/3-4I langrs morginn konungs ‘long is the king’s morning’. — [8] á valt ‘always’: Usually spelled as one word ávalt. The adv. alliterates on v- in Gamlkan Has 59/5VII, Anon Leið 34/5VII and Anon Nkt 14/5II, suggesting that whatever its true etymology (AEW: ávalt), by C12th it had been reinterpreted as á + valt. See also Note to st. 26/1.

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