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Anonymous Poems (Anon)

VII. Heilagra meyja drápa (Mey) - 60

Heilagra meyja drápa (‘Drápa about Holy Maidens’) — Anon MeyVII

Kirsten Wolf 2007, ‘(Introduction to) Anonymous, Heilagra meyja drápa’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 891-930.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60 

Skj: [Anonyme digte og vers XIV]: [B. 12]. Af heilogum meyjum, Heilagra meyja drápa. (AII, 526-39, BII, 582-97)

SkP info: VII, 925

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

54 — Anon Mey 54VII

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kirsten Wolf (ed.) 2007, ‘Anonymous Poems, Heilagra meyja drápa 54’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry on Christian Subjects. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 7. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 925.

Tíu þúsundir tígnar meyja
tel eg greinandi riett og eina;
Ussula var fyr öllum þessum
Einglands blóm, er fór til Róma.
Vænar meyjar hjuggu Húnir;
hrottar skýfðu brúðir drottins;
dýrkuð er Kolnis kirkja
kraftarík af þeira líkum.

 

Recording correctly, I count 11,000 [lit. ten thousand and one] maidens of distinction; Ursula, the flower of England, who went to Rome, was the leader of them all. The Huns slew the beautiful maidens; the swords slashed {the brides of the Lord}; [HOLY WOMEN] the church of Cologne, rich in miracles, is now worshipped because of their bodies.

notes: The story of S. Ursula and her 11,000 virgin martyr companions has some similarities to that of Sunniva. It was known in Iceland from Breta sögur (first half of C13th), a translation of Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Historia Regum Britaniae (c. 1136). There is also a brief epitome of the legend in a C14th ms. (Widding, Bekker-Nielsen and Shook 1963, 335). On the cult in Iceland, see Cormack 1994, 29, 34-5, 158. In its elaborated form, the legend of Ursula grew out of a veneration of a small number of unnamed virgins at Cologne in C4th, but, by the C12th, Ursula had become the daughter of a king of Britain. She, together with 11,000 virgins, went on a pilgrimage to Rome and, on their return journey they were murdered by the Huns at Cologne on account of their Christian faith.

editions: Skj [Anonyme digte og vers XIV]: [B. 12]. Af heilogum meyjum 54 (AII, 537; BII, 595); Skald II, 330, NN §§2764, 2970B.

sources

AM 721 4° (721) 10r - 10r (Mey)  transcr.  image  image  
AM 713 4° (713) 27, 27 - 27, 29  image  image  
Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated