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Data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas

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Anonymous Lausavísur (Anon)

I. 8. Lausavísur from Vǫlsa þáttr (Vǫlsa) - 14

2.2: Lausavísur from Vǫlsa þáttr — Anon (Vǫlsa)I

Wilhelm Heizmann 2012, ‘ Anonymous, Lausavísur from Vǫlsa þáttr’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1089. <https://skaldic.org/m.php?p=text&i=2935> (accessed 22 September 2021)

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13 

for reference only:  14 

Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII]: D. 4. Vers af Vǫlsaþáttr (AII, 219-21, BII, 237-9)

SkP info: I, 1098

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

6 — Anon (Vǫlsa) 6I

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Wilhelm Heizmann (ed.) 2012, ‘Anonymous Lausavísur, Lausavísur from Vǫlsa þáttr 6’ in Diana Whaley (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 1: From Mythical Times to c. 1035. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 1. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1098.

Beri þér beytil         fyrir brúðkonur!
Þær skulu vingul         væta í aftan.
Þiggi Maurnir         þetta blæti!
En þú, dóttir bónda,         drag þú at þér Vǫlsa!

Beri þér beytil fyrir brúðkonur! Þær skulu væta vingul í aftan. Þiggi Maurnir þetta blæti! En þú, dóttir bónda, drag þú at þér Vǫlsa!

Carry the pintle before the bridesmaids! They shall moisten the dong this evening. May Maurnir receive this offering! But you, farmer’s daughter, you pull Vǫlsi towards you!

Mss: Flat(122ra) (Flat); 292ˣ(55r) (Vǫlsa)

Readings: [5] Þiggi Maurnir: abbrev. as ‘.þ. m.’ Flat

Editions: Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII], D. 4. Vers af Vǫlsaþáttr 6: AII, 220, BII, 238, Skald II, 123; Flat 1860-8, II, 334 (Vǫlsa); Guðbrandur Vigfússon 1860, 136, CPB II, 382, Edd. Min. 124, Schröder 1933, 81.

Context: The son of the house takes hold of Vǫlsi, brandishes it at his sister, and speaks a stanza which continues in the same obscene tone that he adopted at the beginning of the poem (st. 2).

Notes: [1-4]: Cf. Þry 30/3-6: Berið inn hamar, | brúði at vígia, | leggit Miǫllni | í meyiar kné ‘Bring in the hammer to consecrate the bride, put Mjǫlnir in the maiden’s lap’ (NK 115). The hammer is a widespread fertility symbol (Kommentar II, 570), and in this context it is equally as ambiguous as kné (Kommentar II, 571). The two stanzas are connected by references to penis (beytill, hamarr), bride (brúðkona, brúðr), and the female genitals (indirectly: væta ‘moisten’, directly: kné ‘lap’; cf. Fritzner: kné 1). — [1] beytil ‘the pintle’: Also attested as a personal nickname, related to bauta ‘beat’ (AEW: beytill), cf. OE bȳtel, bīetl ‘hammer’. The plant name góibeytill, for field horsetail (Equisetum arvense L), which is found in Ldn (ÍF 1, 273) and Bárðar saga (ÍF 13, 110), offers an interesting parallel (Heizmann 1993, 21). The name refers to the fertile sporangial shoots of the plant that appear in the spring. Their phallic shape has given rise to names with a second element referring to the penis, e.g. Ger. dialect Perdsjlöt ‘horse-prick’, Pfåffenschwånz ‘priest-prick’ or Dan. hundepik ‘dog-prick’, rævepik ‘fox-prick’, præstepintel ‘priest-prick’ (see Marzell and Paul 1943-79, II, 237, 245; Lange 1959, 533, 536); cf. also Eng. cuckoo-pintle/pint (Arum Maculatum), containing pintle or pint ‘penis’, also ‘bolt, pin’. — [2] brúðkonur ‘the bridesmaids’: Usually the term brúðkona refers to the woman who sits next to the bride on the bench. Here, on the other hand, all female members of the household are addressed as potential ‘brides’ of Vǫlsi (cf. Näsström 2002, 153). It has also been suggested that brúðkonur refers to the Maurnir either as an equivalent (Olrik and Ellekilde 1926-51, I, 167; Ström 1954, 28) or in terms of a ritual role-play (Steinsland and Vogt 1981, 98-9, 102). For the possibility that Maurnir is pl., see Note to st. 4/5.

Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated