This interface will soon cease to be publicly available. Use the new interface instead. Click here to switch over now.

Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas

login: password: stay logged in: help

Ǫrvar-Oddr (ǪrvOdd)

volume 8; ed. Margaret Clunies Ross;

Lausavísur (Lv) - 32

Lausavísur — ǪrvOdd LvVIII

Not published: do not cite (ǪrvOdd LvVIII)

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32 

SkP info: VIII, 826

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

5 — ǪrvOdd Lv 5VIII (Ǫrv 13)

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.) 2017, ‘Ǫrvar-Odds saga 13 (Ǫrvar-Oddr, Lausavísur 5)’ in Margaret Clunies Ross (ed.), Poetry in fornaldarsögur. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 8. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 826.

The following seventeen stanzas are attributed to the dying Hjálmarr in the various mss of Heiðr and Ǫrv, except for the first (Ǫrv 13), which is spoken by Oddr. They have conventionally been regarded as a poem often entitled ‘Hjálmarr’s death-song’.

1. Eight stanzas (Ǫrv 13-20) are present both in mss of Heiðr (2845 and R715ˣ) and in the following mss of Ǫrv: 344a, 343a, 471 and 173ˣ, although Ǫrv 20 is missing from 344a (see Table 1). However, the order of the stanzas, as given here (and in Skj and Skald) follows the order in which they appear in the 2845 ms. of Heiðr and not the order of the Ǫrv mss. R715ˣ, which is a ms. of Heiðr that neither Skj nor Skald made use of, follows the same order of stanzas as 2845, except that the order of Ǫrv 18 and 19 is reversed in R715ˣ. Both Heiðr mss are witness to Ǫrv 13-20 only.

2. In addition, four stanzas (Ǫrv 21-4) appear in mss 344a, 343a, 471 and 173ˣ of Ǫrv only, and these were labelled Addendum α in Skj and Skald.

3. Five other stanzas (Ǫrv 25-9), consisting of a roll-call of Hjálmarr’s comrades, are found only in the younger Ǫrv mss 343a, 471 and 173ˣSkj and Skald label these Addendum β.

Both the diversity of the ms. record across the two sagas and the differing order of stanzas between them and within the Ǫrv mss point to considerable variation on the one hand, and amplification on the other, in the traditions that supported the generation of stanzas that were attracted to the topic of Hjálmarr’s death-song, which is a variant of the so-called ævidrápa tradition, recte ævikviða, as most such poems contain no refrain, that we also find in Ǫrvar-Oddr’s Ævidrápa. In that case, too, there is an observable tendency to amplify in the younger mss.

Table 2 below shows the order of Ǫrv 13-29 in the various mss of both sagas. See also Table 1 which sets out the distribution of the stanzas across the mss.


TABLE 2
Order of Ǫrv
13-29 in the manuscripts of Heiðr and Ǫrv
2845   







R715ˣ    
344a    






343a    






471    







173ˣ    
13






13
13






13






13







13
14






14
14






14






14







14
15






15
21






21






21







21
16






16
19






19






19







19
17






17
17






22






17







17
18






19
22






17






22







22
19






18
23






23






23







23
20






20
15






15






15







15
 ✗






 ✗
18






18






18







18
 ✗






 ✗
24






24






24







24
 ✗






 ✗
16






25






25







25
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






26






26







27
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






27






27







28
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






28






28







26
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






29






29







29
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






16






16







16
 ✗






 ✗
 ✗






20






20







20

Hvat er þér, Hjálmarr?         Hefr þú lit brugðit.
Þik kveð ek mæða         margar undir.
Hjálmr er þinn höggvinn,         en á hlið brynja;
nú kveð ek fjörvi         um farit þínu.

Hvat er þér, Hjálmarr? Þú hefr brugðit lit. Ek kveð margar undir mæða þik. Hjálmr þinn er höggvinn, en brynja á hlið; nú kveð ek fjörvi þínu um farit.

What is the matter with you, Hjálmarr? You have changed colour. I say many wounds are exhausting you. Your helmet is shattered, and your mail-coat has a rent; now I say that your life has come to an end.

Mss: 2845(63v-64r), R715ˣ(10r-v) (Heiðr); 344a(17v) (ll. 1-2), 343a(68r), 471(75r), 173ˣ(36r-26v) (Ǫrv)

Readings: [2] brugðit: so all others, ‘brugit’ 2845    [3] kveð ek: sé ek 173ˣ    [4] margar: miklar R715ˣ, 343a, 471, 173ˣ    [6] en á hlið: so R715ˣ, 343a, 471, 173ˣ, ok in síða 2845    [7] kveð ek: held ek 173ˣ    [8] um: so 343a, 173ˣ, ok 2845, á R715ˣ, om. 173ˣ;    farit: ‘fari’ R715ˣ

Editions: Skj: Anonyme digte og vers [XIII], E. 10. Vers af Fornaldarsagaer: Af Ǫrvar-Oddssaga IV 1: AII, 292, BII, 312-13, Skald II, 166, NN §2838; Ǫrv 1888, 102, Ǫrv 1892, 57, FSGJ 2, 257; Heiðr 1924, 12, 99, Heiðr 1960, 7; Edd. Min. 49, 52.

Context: In both Ǫrv and Heiðr, Oddr speaks this stanza at the end of the fight against the berserks, when Hjálmarr has killed Angantýr but has himself sustained mortal wounds.

Notes: [All]: It can be seen here that R715ˣ must derive from a version of the stanza that is much closer to that of the Ǫrv mss than to the exemplar of 2845. Ms. 344a has only the first two lines of this stanza. — [4] margar undir ‘many wounds’: The remaining mss have miklar undir ‘great wounds’, which is a perfectly acceptable reading. — [6] en brynja á hlið ‘and your mail-coat has a rent’: This, the reading of R715ˣ and the Ǫrv mss, must be correct, as it bears alliteration, whereas 2845’s ok in síða brynja ‘and the long mail-coat’ does not, though it makes sense. Skj B interprets the line as ‘and your mail-coat on your side’, understanding á as ‘on’ and hlið f. ‘side’, rather than hlið n. ‘gate, rent, space’. As Kock (NN §2838) points out, the reading presented here is consistent with Hjálmarr’s complaint in the following stanza (Ǫrv 14/2) that his mail-coat is broken. — [7-8]: For the idiom fara um (or of) fjǫrvi ‘die, come to the end of one’s life’, cf. Lok 57/6.

Runic data from Samnordisk runtextdatabas, Uppsala universitet, unless otherwise stated