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Runic Dictionary

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Stúfr inn blindi Þórðarson kattar (Stúfr)

11th century; volume 2; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

Stúfsdrápa (Stúfdr) - 8

Stúfr inn blindi ‘the Blind’ Þórðarson kattar ‘of the Cat’ came from an illustrious family of Icel. poets. He was the great-grandson of the skald Glúmr Geirason (GlúmrI) and the grandson of Guðrún Ósvífrsdóttir (see Laxdœla saga, ÍF 5, 87, 94, 281-90). He was also related to Einarr skálaglamm ‘Tinkle-scales’ (EskálI), Úlfr stallari ‘the Marshal’ Óspaksson (Úlfr) and Steinn Herdísarson (Steinn) (See Genealogy IV, ÍF 5). What we know about his life is detailed in two versions of Stúfs þáttr, which has been transmitted in a longer and a shorter version (see ÍF 5, xcii-xciv, 279-90). Stúfr was born c. 1025 and, as his nickname indicates, he must have been blind or had extremely poor vision (it could be, however, that his eyesight failed him in old age, contributing to his nickname; see ÍF 5, xciii). Around 1060 he travelled to Norway to claim an inheritance, and while he was there he met King Haraldr harðráði Sigurðarson. The following summer Stúfr visited the king in Trondheim, became his retainer and recited a poem which he had composed in Haraldr’s honour. He then apparently returned to Iceland, and nothing more is known about him (see also SnE 1848-87, III, 593-5; LH 1894-1901, I, 633-4). Skáldatal (SnE 1848-87, III, 254, 262, 275) lists him among the court poets of Haraldr harðráði.

Stúfsdrápa — Stúfr StúfdrII

Kari Ellen Gade 2009, ‘(Introduction to) Stúfr inn blindi Þórðarson kattar, Stúfsdrápa’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 350-8.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8 

Skj: Stúfr enn blindi Þórðarson kattar: Stúfsdrápa, Stúfa, o. 1067 (AI, 404-5, BI, 373-4)

SkP info: II, 356-7

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

7 — Stúfr Stúfdr 7II

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2009, ‘Stúfr inn blindi Þórðarson kattar, Stúfsdrápa 7’ in Kari Ellen Gade (ed.), Poetry from the Kings’ Sagas 2: From c. 1035 to c. 1300. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 2. Turnhout: Brepols, pp. 356-7.

Tíreggjaðr hjó tyggi
tveim hǫndum lið beima;
reifr gekk herr und hlífar
hizig suðr fyr Nizi.

Tíreggjaðr tyggi hjó lið beima tveim hǫndum; reifr herr gekk und hlífar hizig suðr fyr Nizi.

The fame-spurred ruler cut down the troop of warriors with both hands; the cheerful army advanced beneath shields there south of the Nissan.

Mss: R(39v), Tˣ(41r), U(37r), A(15r), B(6v), 744ˣ(41r), C(9r) (SnE)

Readings: [2] lið: kyn A, B    [3] reifr: so Tˣ, U, A, 744ˣ, C, reif R, ‘re[…]’ B;    herr: hann A, B, C;    hlífar: hlífar or hlakkar B, hlakkar 744ˣ    [4] hizig: ‘hizi’ U

Editions: Skj: Stúfr enn blindi Þórðarson kattar, Stúfsdrápa, Stúfa 7: AI, 405, BI, 374, Skald 186; SnE 1848-87, I, 520-1, II, 342-3, 461, 540, 606, SnE 1931, 182, SnE 1998, I, 102.

Context: Tyggi is given in Skm as a heiti for ‘nobleman, king, jarl’.

Notes: [All]: Because B is difficult to read, AM 744 4°ˣ (744ˣ), an early C18th copy of B by Jón Ólafsson, has also been used selectively. — [All]: The helmingr commemorates the battle of the river Nissan (Niz) between Haraldr and Sveinn Úlfsson (9 August 1062). See also Arn Hardr 2-4, ÞjóðA Sex 13-18, Steinn Nizv and Steinn Úlffl. — [4] hizig suðr fyr Nizi ‘there south of the Nissan’: This l. could also belong to the first cl.: ‘The fame-eager ruler cut down the troop of warriors with both hands there south of the Nissan’. The Nissan is a river in Halland, present-day Sweden (then a part of Denmark).

© 2008-