This interface will soon cease to be publicly available. Use the new interface instead. Click here to switch over now.

Cookies on our website

We use cookies on this website, mainly to provide a secure browsing experience but also to collect statistics on how the website is used. You can find out more about the cookies we set, the information we store and how we use it on the cookies page.

Runic Dictionary

login: password: stay logged in: help

Snorri Sturluson (SnSt)

13th century; volume 3; ed. Kari Ellen Gade;

III. Háttatal (Ht) - 102

prose works

Háttatal — SnSt HtIII

Kari Ellen Gade 2017, ‘(Introduction to) Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1094.

stanzas:  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77   78   79   80   81   82   83   84   85   86   87   88   89   90   91   92   93   94   95   96   97   98   99   100   101   102 

Skj: Snorri Sturluson: 2. Háttatal, 1222-23 (AII, 52-77, BII, 61-88)

SkP info: III, 1189

old edition introduction edition manuscripts transcriptions concordance search files

78 — SnSt Ht 78III

edition interactive full text transcriptions old edition references concordance

 

Cite as: Kari Ellen Gade (ed.) 2017, ‘Snorri Sturluson, Háttatal 78’ in Kari Ellen Gade and Edith Marold (eds), Poetry from Treatises on Poetics. Skaldic Poetry of the Scandinavian Middle Ages 3. Turnhout: Brepols, p. 1189.

Hrǫnn skerr (hvatt ferr)
húfr kaldr (allvaldr);
lá brýtr (lǫg skýtr)
lim-Garmr (rangbarmr).
Brátt skekr (byrr rekr)
blán vegg (ráskegg);
jarl lætr almætr
ósvipt húnskript.

Kaldr húfr skerr hrǫnn; allvaldr ferr hvatt; {lim-Garmr} brýtr lá; rangbarmr skýtr lǫg. Skekr blán vegg brátt; byrr rekr {ráskegg}; almætr jarl lætr {húnskript} ósvipt.

The cold hull cuts the wave; the mighty ruler travels fast; {the branch-Garmr <dog>} [STORM] breaks the surf; the curved side of the ship thrusts aside the sea. The dark sail suddenly shakes; the breeze unfolds {the sailyard-beard} [SAIL]; the thoroughly glorious jarl leaves {the decorated cloth of the mast-top} [SAIL] unreefed.

Mss: R(52r), W(150) (SnE)

Readings: [6] blán: blá‑ W

Editions: Skj: Snorri Sturluson, 2. Háttatal 78: AII, 72, BII, 82, Skald II, 45; SnE 1848-87, I, 694-7, III, 130-1, SnE 1879-81, I, 13, 83, II, 29, SnE 1931, 247, SnE 2007, 32-3; Konráð Gíslason 1895-7, I, 49-50.

Context: The name of the metre is alhnept ‘completely curtailed’. All lines are tetrasyllabic and have internal rhymes (aðalhendingar) on secondarily stressed syllables in positions 2 and 4. The internal rhymes are monosyllabic (hnept, see st. 77 above) and comprise the entire rhyming syllable (SnE 2007, 33: <ok lúkask> báðar í einn staf ‘and both [syllables] end with the same letter’). In the odd lines alliteration falls in positions 1 and 3. All lines are Type A2ab.

Notes: [All]: For this metre, see also RvHbreiðm Hl 49-50, 69-70 and 77-8. It is also attested in Ótt Óldr 1/4, 2/2, 5/2, 4 and 6/4. — [4] lim-Garmr ‘the branch-Garmr <dog> [STORM]’: Garmr was the dog whose barking presaged the end of the world in Old Norse myth (see Vsp 44/1, 49/1, 58/1). The sense of this kenning is ‘destroyer of branches’, i.e. ‘storm’, though kennings of this type usually refer to ‘fire’ (e.g. ESk Run 7/8II). — [4] rangbarmr ‘the curved side of the ship’: Lit. ‘the frame-rim’. — [5] skekr ‘shakes’: Used impersonally with blán vegg ‘the dark sail’ (l. 6) as the acc. object. — [8] húnskript ‘the decorated cloth of the mast-top [SAIL]’: A sail decorated with pictures (see Sturl Hákkv 11/5II and Note to ÞjóðA Magnfl 2/8II).

© 2008-